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Woman Runs Oregon PCT in Seven Days, Sets New Record

Finishing any section of the Pacific Crest Trail is an accomplishment in its own right, but Emily Halnon took that challenge one step further. She broke the trail speed record on the Oregon section of the PCT after traversing 455 miles over seven days.

The inspiration for the adventure came from Halnon's mother, Andrea Halnon, who was an avid runner herself. This past January, Emily lost her mother to cancer and decided to run part of the PCT to honor her incredible spirit.

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On August 1st, the 35-year-old embarked from the Oregon-California border and began running over mountains and river valleys. At moments, she found herself caught in thunderstorms or sweating through dizzying heat, yet she still managed to keep running. Despite the fatigue and pain in her feet and shins, Halnon sustained 17-hour days on the trail, averaging about 57 miles per day. Halnon ran the route supported with close friends and her boyfriend joining her along different sections. They helped keep her morale up and kept her supplied.

By the time she reached the finish line at the Washington border on August 9th, she'd clocked a time of seven days, 19 hours, and 23 minutes. It was the fastest supported time ever recorded for an individual. If that achievement wasn't already worth celebrating, Halnon used the run as a fundraiser for the Brave Like Gabe Foundation. By the time she finished her grand adventure, she had raised $32,000, which will be put towards cancer research. 

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Video: Floating Iceberg Flips With Ice Climbers On it
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Video: Floating Iceberg Flips With Ice Climbers On it

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If there’s one thing should have taught you is that icebergs are freakin’ scary. Sure, they’re known to hide 90 percent of their bulk under the surface, but every now and then they get a little top heavy and literally flip. On a recent expedition into iceberg-strewn waters, explorer Mike Horn and an unknown climbing partner went for a quick afternoon lap with the ice tools on a floating chunk of ice. Out of nowhere, the iceberg flipped with them still on it, tossing them into the frigid

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TGR Journal Vol. 1
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Chinese Everest Teams Are On Their Way To Summit
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