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Photo Tips for the Eclipse if You Don’t Have an Expensive Camera

Most people don't have thousands of dollars worth of expensive camera and filters needed to capture all the glory of Monday's full eclipse. Fortunately, we put together the following list as a resource to use for those who shoot exclusively with their smartphones and POV cameras. Armed with this information it should be easy to get an A+ Instagram out of this once in a lifetime natural phenomena.  

Avoid the Haze of Wildfires

A good portion of the Western United States is experiencing wildfire activity. Our first tip (and hopefully the most obvious) is to avoid these areas. If you live near fire activity and are experiencing the haze associated these events get as high as you can. Find a mountain, hill, or a step ladder to get your head into some clear airspace. Check out a map of all fire activity here.

Take Advantage of Partial Totality

Even when you are in partial totality, there is an incredible amount of activity around you. This picture above shows what shadows look like leading up to the full totality.  If you look at the shadows of the trees, you'll notice the little discs. During the actual eclipse, there will be all kinds of these little details in the shadows. 

There Are Other Places to Point the Camera 

The eclipse is just part of what you should shoot. In order to capture the eclipse successfully, you would need filters and other expensive camera gear. Most of this is sold out and probably not available quickly to you right now. There are other places to point your camera. The lighting of the landscape will change, animals will get confused. Embrace the overall ambience of the moment. 

Use Your GoPro

Most people probably have a GoPro. Use it. Frame an interesting shoot and set it up in time-lapse mode. You don't need a filter for the camera to capture the overall event. It takes the focus away from staring at the sun. Learn how to shoot in timelapse mode here.

Also, Don't Point Your Camera Directly at the Sun

If you point your camera at the sun you could seriously endanger yourself and the camera. Don't do it. 

iOS 11 is set to become the most advanced and the most secure operating system of the Apple devices.
Indeed, we have no hesitation in believing that when the iOS 11 releases, it will be appreciated by one and all.
Besides, it also has a host of new features, including a new dark or night mode. Want to know more about it? Please visit my website iOS 11 Beta

Thanks for the heads-up!

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