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Military tunnels deep inside Mali Hum

The taxi drivers are a great information source. This time I asked about a hole in a cliff face, and got all the information I needed to visit it later. And it should be a safe place to go to...

... but it is still intriguing. I'm always intrigued if I see a hole in rock. This particular hole turned out to be military-dug tunnels, defence positions built after the WW2. But even after visiting the tunnels, many questions remain. What's the purpose of the huge ventilation ducts? To draw away the gun smoke? Why are there two tunnels leading to the same complex, but the other one blocked, except for a hole too small for a person to go through?

And how can one access the hole high up on the cliff face -- the one that I had initially noticed? Perhaps I should have climbed to the door up on the walls of the bunker, but I didn't feel like doing sketchy climbs on a solo trip inside a mountain.

Entering these tunnels was an exercise in withstanding something that I really hate, flies.. lots of flies resting from sunshine inside. When someone walks in, they all raise up and fly around you. More flies than I've ever seen.

Coordinates: N 43.04755 E 16.10746.

The high up tunnel:

The left (less finished) tunnel:

The climb to the 2nd level and possibly to the upper tunnel:

Hole between the two tunnels:

The flies:

Saw this elsewhere, could not decide whether this is a great idea a bad bad mistake. Military and alcohol don't usually mix:

Natural caves crossed by the tunnels:

Ventilation ducts in the gun (?) room:

The road to the caves:

This article has also been published at Blogspot. See all the caving and urban exploration stories at planetcaver.net and theurbanexplorer.net, or take a look all the stories at Blogspot and TGR! Photos and text (c) 2019 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.

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