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‘Glen Canyon Rediscovered’ : Exploring Arizona’s Infamous Canyon by Kayak

Once the concrete had been poured and cured for the 710-foot Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, Glen Canyon felt forever lost to the waters of the Colorado River. The water quickly pooled into the 186-mile canyon to become part of the massive blue body of water that is Lake Powell. 

The canyon was pronounced dead by the Sierra Club in 1963 and its loss encompassed more than just geological wonders, but also Anasazi ruins, petroglyphs, and burial sites. Its absence was mourned by conservationists and native communities alike. But the canyon isn’t truly dead, at least that’s what filmmaker and Taylor Graham discovered in 2017.

RELATED: Why the Government Shutdown has not Been Great for Public Lands

At the time, the West was experiencing a monumental drought. The Lake Powell reservoir was dwindling, and as the water level began to inch downward Glen Canyon’s many wonders slowly became unveiled. Enchanted by the lore he heard about the canyon since childhood, Graham used the drought as an opportunity to see the canyon firsthand. Joined by a small crew of friends, Graham and his team embarked on a 42-day kayak mission along the Colorado River as seen in the short film Glen Canyon Rediscovered. Follow their journey through the infamous canyon as they remind us of the importance Glen Canyon still holds today.

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​6 Pieces of Invaluable Backcountry Technology
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​6 Pieces of Invaluable Backcountry Technology

​6 Pieces of Invaluable Backcountry Technology

The topic of technology comes up again and again between backcountry travelers. Nowadays, with our daily lives revolving around computers and electronic devices, it is understandable that we wish to escape the pull of our devices when we are out in the mountains. However, certain pieces of technology are undeniably helpful to safe backcountry travel. Beacon/Shovel/Probe The holy trinity. It’s as simple as saying, DO NOT go into the backcountry without a working avalanche beacon, shovel, and

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TGR Playgrounds: Foot Powered First Descents in Kluane National Park
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TGR Playgrounds: Foot Powered First Descents in Kluane National Park

TGR Playgrounds: Foot Powered First Descents in Kluane National Park

In May 2017, five friends and I ventured deep into the Yukon in search of unexplored peaks and huge ski lines awaiting first descents. This part of the world has an unfathomably large amount of unskied terrain, so the decision on where to go did not come easily. After weighing our destination options, we settled on Kluane National Park, a huge patch of land spanning from the Alaskan border into the Yukon interior. It had exactly what we were looking for: remoteness, enormous mountains, and

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National Geographic Announces 2019 Adventurers of the Year
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National Geographic Announces 2019 Adventurers of the Year

National Geographic Announces 2019 Adventurers of the Year

2019 was a wild year in the adventure world, with everything from first descents and ascents of the planet’s wildest peaks, to stories of incredible rescue missions in impossibly harsh environments. Each year, National Geographic selects of Adventurers of the Year, people who have accomplished things so out of the ordinary that they deserve higher recognition. Among those who have won this award in the past are Jeremy Jones, Alex Honnold, Kilian Jornet, and Hilaree Nelson, to name a few.