Sign In:

×

Last Step!

Please enter your public display name and a secure password.

Plan to post in the forums? Change your default forum handle here!

×
×

6 Ways on Making the Most of Your Hiking Adventure

Hiking in the wilderness is an incredible experience that lifts your mood and exposes you to the wonders of the natural world. While hikers enjoy backpacking in every season, you should take precautions to ensure your hike is safe and trouble-free. Most accidents on the trails occur when hikers become lost and or disoriented. Detailed maps of the routes are essential items, but for longer trips, you can include a GPS device or satellite phone. During an emergency rescue, responders can find you quicker and easier if they can follow a signal to your location.

Bring a Loyal Companion

Solo hiking can be a rewarding activity. When you’re struggling with the chaos of daily life, it’s nice to get away from the crowd and enjoy a relaxing stroll in the forest. Unfortunately, solo hiking can be more hazardous than hiking in groups, and it’s helpful to bring a loyal dog along for solo hikes. Your dog may need time to get accustomed to walking on trails, but most animals learn fast and enjoy the sights and sounds of the nature around them. Although wildlife attacks and robberies on the trails are rare, your companion can protect you from threatening wildlife or random criminals. If you’re hiking on challenging trails that include steep climbs and rocky terrain, your dog’s muscles and joints may need some relief after your trip. You can apply CBD oil for dogs to help your friend recover from an exhaustive trip.

Plan Your Route Ahead of Time

Before you set out, you should study the proposed routes on your hiking maps. Whether you’re planning a week-long adventure or a short jaunt, it’s essential to locate all the available water sources on the map. You should bring an adequate supply of water with you, but it’s wise to know where you can locate water at any time during your trip. It’s also helpful to find out where streams, creeks or rivers interfere with the walking paths. Several popular trails have bridges over water sources, and others may only have a group of rocks that lead across the water. Unique features, like a rock trail across the water, are not typically included in trail maps, but if you communicate with locals or connect with experienced hikers on social media, you can avoid any surprises on the trails.

Pack First Aid Supplies

A well-supplied first aid kit is an essential item that you should always include on a backpacking trip. Insects, thorny vegetation and uneven terrain can cause minor injuries that demand immediate treatment. Your kit should consist of bandages, alcohol swabs, disinfectants and moleskin. Hikers frequently dismiss moleskin as an essential item, but if your new boots create painful blisters, moleskin coverings provide relief and allow you to continue your hike.

Bring Food and Water

Even when you take a day trip to the wilderness, it’s necessary to bring extra food and water. Always pack more than you need in case you have an accident and become stranded. It would be best if you didn’t overload yourself with a week’s worth of food, but you can bring extra energy bars and water that won’t add much weight to your backpack.

Pack Rain Gear

The weather is unpredictable in early fall, and storms can roll in and complicate your hike at any time. Although some day hikers choose to bring an umbrella in case of rain, you should only use a light raincoat or poncho on the trails. Many hiking trails are narrow with overhanging branches, and umbrellas can quickly become damaged and unusable. Also, hikers moving in the opposite direction have problems navigating around people with umbrellas.

Keep a Charged Phone for Emergencies

In mountainous regions, you probably won’t get a signal from your mobile phone. Calling for help may be impossible if you get into trouble, but all phones have a unique ping that can be located by emergency personnel. Keep a fully charged phone in your pack in case you need to transmit a ping during an accident.

As long as you’re prepared for your excursion, you can enjoy the great outdoors without worries.

Play
READ THE STORY
Video: Floating Iceberg Flips With Ice Climbers On it
Up Next Adventure

Video: Floating Iceberg Flips With Ice Climbers On it

Video: Floating Iceberg Flips With Ice Climbers On it

If there’s one thing should have taught you is that icebergs are freakin’ scary. Sure, they’re known to hide 90 percent of their bulk under the surface, but every now and then they get a little top heavy and literally flip. On a recent expedition into iceberg-strewn waters, explorer Mike Horn and an unknown climbing partner went for a quick afternoon lap with the ice tools on a floating chunk of ice. Out of nowhere, the iceberg flipped with them still on it, tossing them into the frigid

Play
READ THE STORY
TGR Journal Vol. 1
Play
READ THE STORY
Woman Runs Oregon PCT in Seven Days, Sets New Record
Up Next Adventure

Woman Runs Oregon PCT in Seven Days, Sets New Record

Woman Runs Oregon PCT in Seven Days, Sets New Record

Finishing any section of the Pacific Crest Trail is an accomplishment in its own right, but Emily Halnon took that challenge one step further. She broke the trail speed record on the Oregon section of the PCT after traversing 455 miles over seven days. The inspiration for the adventure came from Halnon's mother, Andrea Halnon, who was an avid runner herself. This past January, Emily lost her mother to cancer and decided to run part of the PCT to honor her incredible spirit. RELATED: Full