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  1. #2951
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    ^noice

  2. #2952
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    That's sweet! Well done.

  3. #2953
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    That's sweet! Well done.
    I had the wood already, and I was wondering how to finish it. Then I saw your cabinet. Thanks!!

  4. #2954
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianpnw View Post
    Attachment 477834
    Built this with my wife - and we’re still married! Just need a few hooks for the ski clothing….
    Birch ply and beetle-kill pine, finished in the TGR approved fashion (Varathane natural stain, satin poly)
    wow, beautiful work!

    both me and stbmrstgapp are looking at this thread together and we were wondering how hard it would be for two woodworking jongs to build something like this:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/BdsmDIY/s/FuccPs7jrh

    we have a miter saw and basic tools, is this within the realm of possibility for folks like us? where could we get started? what sort of wood would we need to find?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  5. #2955
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    wow, beautiful work!

    both me and stbmrstgapp are looking at this thread together and we were wondering how hard it would be for two woodworking jongs to build something like this:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/BdsmDIY/s/FuccPs7jrh

    we have a miter saw and basic tools, is this within the realm of possibility for folks like us? where could we get started? what sort of wood would we need to find?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    Totally possible. There's a few parts on that particular cabinet that were probably cut with a table saw (the little blocks holding up the shelves for example) but there are ways to get around that.

    Miter saws are great but limited in what they can do. One, they only crosscut (they can't rip the length of a board) and two they're not the most accurate tool as the blade likes to deflect (this can be mostly solved by spending time to square up the saw properly, investing in a good blade, and using good technique). That's why the table saw is kinda the cornerstone tool for most woodworking (you can build jigs to allow a table saw to do damn near anything) but like I said - there's ways around it. For example, a circular saw and an edge guide can make damn good rip cuts if you take your time with setup.

    That cabinet is really just a matter of building a box. There are a bajillion different ways to build a box depending on how strong you want it to be, what you want it to look like, whether or not you care if screws are visible, etc. For the most part there's no right or wrong answers, just a matter of how complicated you want to make it. About the only thing you really want to avoid is gluing the end grain of a piece of wood without some other method to reinforce the joint (because the glue seeps into the fibers of the wood). The corners of the box are really where this is an issue. One easy/fast way to deal with that is pocket holes (only requires a drill and a pocket hole jig) but you'd end up with visible screws on the inside. Another good option could be dowels (again, a drill and a simple jig are all you'd need). Or you can get into fancy joinery like the box joints I poorly implemented in my medicine cabinet but most of that is easiest with a table saw.

    As for materials, you could 100% build that out of materials from the big box stores. You could build the shell from plywood, or from boards of whatever wood you like, paint it stain it, etc. Or you could go to a specialty hardwoods store and build it out of high end hardwood veneered plywood or even solid hardwoods, domestic or exotic. Again, it's all a matter of what you want it to look like and how much you want to spend.

    This video I think is pretty helpful:
    https://youtu.be/p1aQQQDXrc8?si=-pWi3rHE2xPVcW0t

  6. #2956
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    A noob is going to use off the shelf boards from HD. The key is taking the time to pick straight ones. Check for bow, bend, cupping, and twist. Look up those terms. Avoid boards with any of those problems if you can. The quality of the finished product will depend more than anything on how good the wood is. For narrower pieces pine or fir are fine--but dried. For panels you can use softwood plywood with an A side on the show side (like AC) but worth using birch plywood if you can afford it. A miter saw and a hand-held circular saw, a drill and an impact driver are plenty as far as power tools.

    Plan the piece using standard widths and thicknesses available at the big box as much as possible. Do an accurate scale drawing of what you want to build, with dimensions written in. Enough views so you can see all the pieces and how they're put together. Make a list of every piece with dimensions so you know how much and what sizes of wood you need to buy.

  7. #2957
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    wow, beautiful work!

    both me and stbmrstgapp are looking at this thread together and we were wondering how hard it would be for two woodworking jongs to build something like this:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/BdsmDIY/s/FuccPs7jrh

    we have a miter saw and basic tools, is this within the realm of possibility for folks like us? where could we get started? what sort of wood would we need to find?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    Seconding adrenalated. You could totally build this cabinet from Home Depot wood and a miter saw and make it look good. You want to build this, but with thinner material and a door, and maybe not as big if you're going wall mounted.



    Frame and interior: 1x6 or 1x8 poplar, depending on how deep you want the shelves. Poplar is an inexpensive hardwood they carry, is generally dry and straight, square edged, and has little to no grain or color so it's great for painting black, red, or whatever color your heart desires for a toy cabinet. You could go to the fabric store and get some faux leather to wrap it in if you wanted to upholster it. The real first step with woodworking is hiding your joints that you want hidden. The super trick for that is a 3/8" countersink or fortener drill bit. Drill the hole into the wood so the screwhead is below the surface. Screw the joint together and insert a 3/8" wood plug with some wood glue. Cut it close to flush with a saw and sand it flat. Screw is gone forever unless you're looking really hard.

    For the mirror frame, you could take the easy way and buy a big framed mirror, or custom build something. Either way you'll likely need plywood ripped to size for the backing to make it sturdy enough to be a door, and finding non-shit plywood at the box store is key. You might be able to find some B-2 grade veneered plywood so the inside of the door will look decent. My local HD's will rip plywood for a fee and if you can find someone who knows how to work the panel saw and measure accurately. If you can't, a basic circular saw and a $20 aluminum straight edge and a $10 piece of styrafoam insulation can get you there. Lay the insulation on the driveway, plywood on top of that. Clamp the straight edge down and cut away with a circular saw. The styrafoam backing supports the cut the whole way so you get a good cut. Just adjust the blade depth so you're not cutting deep into it and making a huge styrafoam mess. Size the plywood so it fits inside your poplar cabinet. When the hinges close, it all disappears.

    Attach the mirror to the plywood. Mirrors are heavy, so pick hinges in enough quantity that are good for the load.

    If you're going for a custom frame around the mirror, most HD's around here do carry a selection of dimensioned hardwoods as well such as oak, walnut, maple, cherry and mahoganhy around here. It will be more expensive than a hardwood dealer by 2 to 3x, but you're not buying a ton of wood to frame the mirror, and you won't have to mill it. Or you could stick with pained poplar. Or some kind of crown or toeboard moulding. Whatever you want for design. Glue and clamp it to your plywood and mirror.

    Sanding and finish prep is the other huge difference in outcomes. Honestly it takes probably 50% of the project time to properly sand and prep for finish. Sanding sucks. Going up through the grits sucks. 3M cubitron II sandpaper makes it suck less because it's the best damn sandpaper out there. Moderately priced, but it cuts better than anything else and lasts for ages. https://taytools.com/collections/sup...ck-80-400-gri7
    Wait, how can we trust this guy^^^ He's clearly not DJSapp

  8. #2958
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    Great advice here. I do wonder though, if you're going to build it out of big box lumber with the bare bones tools, you might want to consider buying something at Ikea. Of course, none of us build furniture because it's the economical choice, but in tgapp's case, something from Ikea modified to fit his needs might be the best bet.

  9. #2959
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    Do Home Depot or Lowe's offer cutting services? Our DIY store out here does and I find it easier sometimes to just get everything cut before I leave the store. Only straight cuts, but it's a pretty awesome service for making things like bunkbeds or shelving units. I just walk in with the dimensions, choose my lumber, tell them where to cut, go home and assemble.

  10. #2960
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    Do Home Depot or Lowe's offer cutting services? Our DIY store out here does and I find it easier sometimes to just get everything cut before I leave the store. Only straight cuts, but it's a pretty awesome service for making things like bunkbeds or shelving units. I just walk in with the dimensions, choose my lumber, tell them where to cut, go home and assemble.
    Home Depot does, not sure about Lowe's

  11. #2961
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    Do Home Depot or Lowe's offer cutting services? Our DIY store out here does and I find it easier sometimes to just get everything cut before I leave the store. Only straight cuts, but it's a pretty awesome service for making things like bunkbeds or shelving units. I just walk in with the dimensions, choose my lumber, tell them where to cut, go home and assemble.
    Pretty sure both do, but my general experience in both is that none of the employees give a flying fuck. Good luck finding someone to actually do it in the first place and if you can, it's highly unlikely that cut is going to be square or accurate.

    As DJSapp says, a circ saw, straightedge, and a sheet of foam is going to yield better results with minimal expense.

  12. #2962
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    Pretty sure both do, but my general experience in both is that none of the employees give a flying fuck. Good luck finding someone to actually do it in the first place and if you can, it's highly unlikely that cut is going to be square or accurate.

    As DJSapp says, a circ saw, straightedge, and a sheet of foam is going to yield better results with minimal expense.
    Thanks everyone, I have a cheap circular saw but I'm less comfortable using it. A lot of the appeal is trying something new; of course I could get something from IKEA but I don't really care for living a disposable life, and by building something, I would be investing in both my skills and in whatever we make. Plus it could be a fun project to do with the girl. We both like crafty things and this sounds like a fun skill to learn together.

    @DJSapp, that's exactly kind of tutorial I needed, but I don't have a stapler. Could I use small nails instead?

    Still trying to wrap my head around this whole project; perhaps an easier first build would be a St. Andrew's cross, but I stg I did not come in here to cunt up your cool project thread with my weird kink.

    If I wanted to do this "right" but cheap, what would be the best basic tools I might need? Circular saw, lots of squares, a few specialized bits, clamps, saw horses, and a table?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  13. #2963
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    Pretty sure both do, but my general experience in both is that none of the employees give a flying fuck. Good luck finding someone to actually do it in the first place and if you can, it's highly unlikely that cut is going to be square or accurate.

    As DJSapp says, a circ saw, straightedge, and a sheet of foam is going to yield better results with minimal expense.
    They have a wall saw at all HD so even a inbred half wit theoretically can do a cut as long as they can read the tape on the frame and you confirm the cut.

  14. #2964
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    Thanks everyone, I have a cheap circular saw but I'm less comfortable using it. A lot of the appeal is trying something new; of course I could get something from IKEA but I don't really care for living a disposable life, and by building something, I would be investing in both my skills and in whatever we make. Plus it could be a fun project to do with the girl. We both like crafty things and this sounds like a fun skill to learn together.

    @DJSapp, that's exactly kind of tutorial I needed, but I don't have a stapler. Could I use small nails instead?

    Still trying to wrap my head around this whole project; perhaps an easier first build would be a St. Andrew's cross, but I stg I did not come in here to cunt up your cool project thread with my weird kink.

    If I wanted to do this "right" but cheap, what would be the best basic tools I might need? Circular saw, lots of squares, a few specialized bits, clamps, saw horses, and a table?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    You are going to surprise yourself so really you just have to start. That’s not Ra Ra bullshit. That’s not to say you couldn’t start by building a distilled version of this to get your bearings. Loves the above advice that this is a glorified box. Have any use for a homemade custom built box? If so, give that a go to cut your teeth. Otherwise, soldier on. YouTube is fucking amazing these days. Not sure how my old man pulled off what he did without the interwebs.

    I’ve been considering a similar project and am lucky to have a shop full of tool but something like this seems super doable with:

    - Miter saw (would have to allow a cut at least as deep as the seat/shelves. Circular is tough as you will have wonky cuts unless you have a fence. If you need wider, even a portable table saw would be good. Table saw required if you have to rip wood instead of cut, but you can either just go as deep as the wood dimensions come, or some big box will rip. But many won’t due to liability)

    - Impact driver and drill

    - wood glue and finish screws

    - T square

    - Level

    - Saw horses for assembly and/or finishing.

    - Electric/battery sander

    - Stain/poly/or paint

    - Not absolutely necessary but a finish nailer/compressor would be great, not super expensive and once you do this project, you will use it for a ton of stuff


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  15. #2965
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    Thanks everyone, I have a cheap circular saw but I'm less comfortable using it. A lot of the appeal is trying something new; of course I could get something from IKEA but I don't really care for living a disposable life, and by building something, I would be investing in both my skills and in whatever we make. Plus it could be a fun project to do with the girl. We both like crafty things and this sounds like a fun skill to learn together.

    @DJSapp, that's exactly kind of tutorial I needed, but I don't have a stapler. Could I use small nails instead?

    Still trying to wrap my head around this whole project; perhaps an easier first build would be a St. Andrew's cross, but I stg I did not come in here to cunt up your cool project thread with my weird kink.

    If I wanted to do this "right" but cheap, what would be the best basic tools I might need? Circular saw, lots of squares, a few specialized bits, clamps, saw horses, and a table?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    Honestly building stuff for your weird kink seems like an ideal use of these skills. Normal stuff you can always just buy cheaper at chain stores or whatever. But the market for kink furniture ain't exactly mainstream, why not build your own?

    Anyway, yeah in that video he used the staples just to temporarily attach to blocks to help him align things. There's a TON of ways you could accomplish that! Doublesided tape. Nails. Screws. Super Glue. Clamps. You get the idea. Yeah something like a screw would leave a hole but 1) it'll be on the back and you'll never see it 2) you can fill the hole if you want.

    Thing about woodworking is there's always a ton of different ways you can accomplish any given task. It's been difficult for me to wrap my head around the concept that it doesn't need to be perfect (I grew up in a machine shop where tolerances of 0.005" are considered generous) but it's true.... it doesn't need to be perfect. Wood isn't perfect. The builder (you) isn't perfect. When you fuck up you can sand it, fill it, alter the design, use the mistake as an accent feature, paint over it, hide it behind another piece, decide it doesn't even matter... seriously, this is for you, it only needs to be as good as you need it to be. I try to keep in mind something Foggy told me while remodeling my house "looks good, feels good, is good."

    As for a tool list, good blades for your saws, a straightedge long enough for the longest cut you need to make to use to mark lines and as a guide for your circ saw (a level is a good choice, very multi purpose, but literally anything straight will do), a carpenter's square, a 3/8" forstner bit and a countersink drill bit for the screws you want to use and you're probably good. I'm not sure you really even need clamps. They might make things easier in a few places but you don't NEED them. Sure you could clamp the straightedge but you could also doublestick tape it. Or have the missus hold it steady. If you do the joints as djsapp suggested (screws and glue) the screws will "clamp" everything. Get yourself a random orbit sander (and a six pack, sanding sucks). You really don't need much else. Just take your time picking out the lumber you're going to use. Make sure it's straight and flat. Go borrow a long level from the tools department and use it to check.

    BTW I can't state the "good saw blades" thing strongly enough. I just upgraded my miter saw to a pretty nice Bosch. Spent an hour squaring the blade/fence/etc. If I throw the stock blade on every cut is wonky as fuck no matter how I clamp or my technique in making the cut. Throw a halfway decent 80T fine finish blade on and every cut is perfect.

    Quote Originally Posted by fatnslow View Post
    They have a wall saw at all HD so even a inbred half wit theoretically can do a cut as long as they can read the tape on the frame and you confirm the cut.
    Still requires the saw to be set up square, the tape to be set correctly, the panel to be set in the frame with no debris lifting it, etc etc etc. I had HD cut some ply for me once, if you have a circular saw there's absolutely no reason not to do it yourself and know that it's done right.
    Last edited by adrenalated; 12-05-2023 at 10:58 PM.

  16. #2966
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buke View Post
    Great advice here. I do wonder though, if you're going to build it out of big box lumber with the bare bones tools, you might want to consider buying something at Ikea. Of course, none of us build furniture because it's the economical choice, but in tgapp's case, something from Ikea modified to fit his needs might be the best bet.
    The advantage of building it yourself is you can use plywood, instead of plywood which tends to dissolve over time.

    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    Pretty sure both do, but my general experience in both is that none of the employees give a flying fuck. Good luck finding someone to actually do it in the first place and if you can, it's highly unlikely that cut is going to be square or accurate.

    As DJSapp says, a circ saw, straightedge, and a sheet of foam is going to yield better results with minimal expense.
    Yeah, the big trick is finding someone at HD to do the cut.
    As for straightedge. Rough cut a piece of hardboard (masonite) about the width of the base of your saw and 8 feet long. Screw a straght 1x an inch or two wide along the factory edge. With the edge of the saw base firmly against the 1 x rip the masonite to final width. Now you have a straight edge where you can line up the cut edge of the masonite where you want the cut, clamp it in place, and keeping the base against the fence (the 1x) you should get a nice straight cut.

    Pay attention to which side of the line you cut. Draw lines as fine as you can and still see them. Cut so the blade is on the waste side of the line with the edge of the blade splitting the line. Saw blades have width and if you cut on the wrong side of the line your piece will be short.

    When possible measure using the work rather than a ruler or tape measure. Say you have a box and want to cut a shelf to fit in it. Don't measure the box with a tape measure and then mark the cut on the shelf with the tape measure. Instead, hold the shelf up to the box with one end against one side of the box and mark the shelf at the other side of the box. Doing it this way is not always possible but when it is you eliminate one source of error.

    If you have a bunch of pieces to cut to the same length, use a stop block next to your miter saw and cut all the pieces with the end of the board against the stop block. Much faster and more accurate than measuring each piece separately.

    Take your time, be careful, double check everything--woodworking should be perfect for someone who takes as much care making an espresso as you do.

  17. #2967
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    Thanks everyone, I have a cheap circular saw but I'm less comfortable using it. A lot of the appeal is trying something new; of course I could get something from IKEA but I don't really care for living a disposable life, and by building something, I would be investing in both my skills and in whatever we make. Plus it could be a fun project to do with the girl. We both like crafty things and this sounds like a fun skill to learn together.

    @DJSapp, that's exactly kind of tutorial I needed, but I don't have a stapler. Could I use small nails instead?

    Still trying to wrap my head around this whole project; perhaps an easier first build would be a St. Andrew's cross, but I stg I did not come in here to cunt up your cool project thread with my weird kink.

    If I wanted to do this "right" but cheap, what would be the best basic tools I might need? Circular saw, lots of squares, a few specialized bits, clamps, saw horses, and a table?

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    You have a bunch of tools in your bedroom that I'm not 100% comfortable with, but I agree there is appeal in trying something new, but maybe not so big at first. We're happy to guide you into this world.

    This project is an oversized medicine cabinet. A box with a hinged door. Most woodworking projects are some variation of a box and it's the place to start. A basic St. Andrews cross can be done with two 2x6x8' boards. Use your miter saw set at a 30 degree angle cut a half lap joint in the middle, and cut 15 degree angles on the ends so it rests on the floor. That's even easier because it's just two parts, and you'll get experience with your miter saw (I'm assuming your miter saw is a sliding saw with a depth stop, which can make the half lap joint). For planning, sketchup is invaluable to me, and it's free. Lots of youtube tutorials out there in how to use it. Here's your cross, 2'6" wide, 7'5" tall at 15 degrees:
    https://app.sketchup.com/share/tc/no...U2Q&source=web

    No idea if those dimensions are right, I just eyeballed it, but the angle can be tweaked easily enough to make it wider.

    Ok, shopping list time. I understand you have a miter saw, a circular saw, and maybe a sander, and assuming you have nothing else.

    1. Drill and driver kit. Red, yellow, blue, green brand. Whatever you like or find a good deal on. Drilling and screwing is important. I have used my neighbor's milwakee fuel drill that has a soft start on it, and it's really nice to not have too much power right away when driving a screw so you don't strip out the head. All other things equal I'd go with that, but I think they're spendy.

    1a. Impact bits. Not a basic cheap ass driver bit kit, a proper impact bit kit that won't shatter into your eyes.
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwauke...5154/325632520


    1b. Drill bits. You'll want other drill bits for other projects, but 99% of woodworking drilling is a pilot hole for a screw with a countersunk screw. Unless you're doing pocket holes and that's something different.
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-S...2535/100531905

    1c. Torx head screws. I don't fuck around with flathead or phillips anymore, they're terrible and stupid and I hate them. But do learn to use the clutch on your drill when driving them in, and turn it down!
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Grip-Rit...GCS1/204959256

    2. Decent sawblades for your saws. Diablo is what I'm running in my saws, and it does pretty well for a low to mid-price point blade. Get a high tooth count for your miter saw, and a plywood blade for your circular saw. The shit they give you with your saw should be disposed of.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-1...060X/100033809
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-7...740R/100017783


    3. Edge guide to do straight rips on big sheets. I use mine to break down 3/4" plywood sheets into manageable sizes to get to the table saw. With some care on setup and practice you can cut to within 1/16th pretty damn easily. Double stick tape in the middle helps a lot here, but isn't necessary.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Empire-9...E902/203175575

    4. A GOOD combo square. One is plenty, but this is 'buy once, cry once' territory, and having a square that is dead on can make or break a project. Taylor toolworks often has blemished high end squares for about half price, but it looks like they're out at the moment because xmas I guess. I fucking love mine, and all it has is a scratch on the brand logo. Lifetime purchase.

    https://taytools.com/collections/too...nation-squares

    Those 4 things on top of what you have will get this project built. There's a whole lot more out there what makes things easier, but I think that's the minimum. Here's some nice to have's:

    GOOD Double stick tape. Fucking indispensible when you just need an extra hand to steady something.
    https://taytools.com/collections/sup...ble-sided-tape

    A shitload of cheap mechanical pencils.

    Clamps are an addiction like buying skis and you'll end up with a quiver. Start with what you absolutely need to get a project done, not what you think you need when you're at the store. I'd recommend a basic set of small bar clamps for work holding to start
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/BESSEY-C...PK-C/312366514

    Tightbond II wood glue. You might end up drinking it after a while

    A shop vac connected to a dust extractor. Sawdust will clog a shopvac in no time flat. A cyclone attached to a bucket makes a massive difference. This is a basic but functional one.
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dustoppe...HD12/302643445

    Basic pocket hole kit. Great for beginners making joints, but if you get into this you'll outgrow it quickly. Pocket hole joints are not strong joints, but you don't necessarly need every joint to be strong. There's a time and place for them.
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Kreg-Poc...0-23/325308532
    Wait, how can we trust this guy^^^ He's clearly not DJSapp

  18. #2968
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    This is classic "Do it yourself just to justify buying the tools."

    Threads like this built America.

    It's reminiscent of when I brought a wrecked truck home to my dad. The garage nearly tripled in size.

    And the next step is when you discover you need a new tool so you create a project to justify buying said tool.

    We're halfway there. Maybe a third of the way there.

    In the meantime, Not DJ is killing it.

  19. #2969
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    This is classic "Do it yourself just to justify buying the tools."

    Threads like this built America.
    Threads like this might hopefully rebuild America. When I searched a St. Andrews cross to get a vague idea of size and proportion and saw the absolute most basic ones on Etsy going for $400+shipping for $15 worth of shit wood and 2 hours of work all in, I see a population that doesn't know how to build things, and an opportunity to turn a possible retirement hobby into a steady whisky fund.

    Or the people buying these things quite obviously have better things to do with their time. And I respect that.
    Wait, how can we trust this guy^^^ He's clearly not DJSapp

  20. #2970
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not DJSapp View Post
    Threads like this might hopefully rebuild America. .... And I respect that.
    I personally love that the need for a secret dildo case is driving the rebuilding of America. Like the old days!

  21. #2971
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    Apparently in the bdsm world St Andrews crosses and other furniture are often built on a barter basis. I read that in the New Yorker, of all places.

  22. #2972
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    Apparently in the bdsm world St Andrews crosses and other furniture are often built on a barter basis. I read that in the New Yorker, of all places.
    This is true of a lot of pro dommes who are building their dungeon - male subs will often trade services (building furniture, cleaning, maintenance) for sessions. When we went to that dungeon space in Chicago there was a male "groundskeeper" that 100% was trading services to the Domme/owner of that space.

    I'm looking at a couple different build ideas - a St. Andrew's cross is fun, but not exactly a daily driver piece. Thanks DJSapp for the list of tools; basically I'll spend on tools what I would on a single piece of furniture, and get a ton more out of it.

    There are also "plans" for various pieces of dungeon furniture you can buy on Etsy for $5 or so. Given how new I am to all of this, that seems like a good investment so that I can follow a recipe to start.

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  23. #2973
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Posts
    699
    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    There are also "plans" for various pieces of dungeon furniture you can buy on Etsy for $5 or so. Given how new I am to all of this, that seems like a good investment so that I can follow a recipe to start.
    Buying plans can be a crapshoot for a beginner. They may assume you have a different toolkit, which will leave you with a potentially harder task of redesigning something that may have been better if it was designed around your toolkit in the first place. At the very least, they will get you thinking about what is possible, and how to overcome challenges with the build with the tools you have. I've also been pretty disappointed with some plans I've purchased in the past as well.

    You have any specifics on your miter saw? Make/model? A sliding miter saw with a depth stop has a lot more utility than a straight chop saw.
    Wait, how can we trust this guy^^^ He's clearly not DJSapp

  24. #2974
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    438
    I need to make a small home office. I don't need much space, but somewhere quiet and I am contemplating starting with a prefab kit or shed. To me and my clueless brain, starting with something like this, delivered and installed for $3500 3 weeks from ordering seems tempting. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Handy-Ho...043751#overlay

    But I have no idea if this is a horrible idea. I looked at a lot of nicer kits, but $15,000 plus $5,000 for building it, is quite a different starting point than all in under $10k. This one is about $4,000 https://www.homedepot.com/p/Handy-Ho...044928#overlay

    Bad idea? I am looking for somewhere to have a laptop, work papers and be able to have a zoom meeting.

  25. #2975
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    23,007
    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    This is true of a lot of pro dommes who are building their dungeon - male subs will often trade services (building furniture, cleaning, maintenance) for sessions. When we went to that dungeon space in Chicago there was a male "groundskeeper" that 100% was trading services to the Domme/owner of that space.

    I'm looking at a couple different build ideas - a St. Andrew's cross is fun, but not exactly a daily driver piece. Thanks DJSapp for the list of tools; basically I'll spend on tools what I would on a single piece of furniture, and get a ton more out of it.

    There are also "plans" for various pieces of dungeon furniture you can buy on Etsy for $5 or so. Given how new I am to all of this, that seems like a good investment so that I can follow a recipe to start.

    Sent from my Pixel 8 Pro using Tapatalk
    Memorize this phrase--"Honey, the money I'm spending on tools will save us a lot of money in the long run." Practice, until you can say it without hesitation,, without doubt in your voice, without laughing. There is no more important adage in woodworking, at least for those with partners.

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