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  1. #3251
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Heh. I find the popularity of road marathons completely baffling.
    Now that I've gotten into trail running, I mostly agree. But for the non or less outdoorsy types, it's a great way to accomplish something huge, which is cool.

    Since I just read this entertaining piece from Semirad about the NYC marathon, I'll quote a good distillation of why some people do it. If you like the NYC Marathon or road marathons in general, it's a good and short read.

    It is hard to overstate the sheer intensity of the crowd for the NYC Marathon. It does wax and wane a bit, depending on the location, and disappears completely on most of the bridges, but overall, it is a truly singular human experience. It’s a gauntlet of positivity and encouragement, keeping you afloat like a sort of life preserver as you swim through your own fatigue and self-doubt. I will always be mystified at what motivates people to leave their homes to help complete strangers get through a hard thing like a marathon, and why it works so well. I suspect there is some day drinking involved in some cases, but overwhelmingly it’s just a tunnel of joy. There is no opposing team to root against, no quarterback to wish ill upon, no referees to blame when things go wrong, just a bunch of real people with real jobs and real worries and real problems, trying hard for one day, and it has some sort of gravitational pull.
    Last edited by fool; 11-17-2022 at 11:57 PM.

  2. #3252
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    Quote Originally Posted by fool View Post
    Now that I've gotten into trail running, I mostly agree. But for the non or less outdoorsy types, it's a great way to accomplish something huge, which is cool.

    It is hard to overstate the sheer intensity of the crowd for the NYC Marathon. It does wax and wane a bit, depending on the location, and disappears completely on most of the bridges, but overall, it is a truly singular human experience. It’s a gauntlet of positivity and encouragement, keeping you afloat like a sort of life preserver as you swim through your own fatigue and self-doubt. I will always be mystified at what motivates people to leave their homes to help complete strangers get through a hard thing like a marathon, and why it works so well. I suspect there is some day drinking involved in some cases, but overwhelmingly it’s just a tunnel of joy. There is no opposing team to root against, no quarterback to wish ill upon, no referees to blame when things go wrong, just a bunch of real people with real jobs and real worries and real problems, trying hard for one day, and it has some sort of gravitational pull.

    Since I just read this entertaining piece from Semirad about the NYC marathon, I'll quote a good distillation of why some people do it. If you like the NYC Marathon or road marathons in general, it's a good and short read.
    I was at the nyc marathon and can attest to this. Really was cool how many people were there, and not just there but cheering, yelling, and cow-belling. The 5ish miles that I walked I didn't see a gap in spectators more than 10 yards long. I'd imagine that'd give you some pretty good fuel as a runner.

    I as well wonder why so many people show up to cheer on. Maybe because running is so approachable, you don't have to be especially fast, strong, ballsy or genetically gifted to be a runner like you do many sports. Most runners are just average people working hard to accomplish a goal and everyone can relate to that. Marathons are about completing and beating "your yesterday" not about beating someone else. Maybe that's why, regardless it is inspiring. Fun to watch

  3. #3253
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    Doing a race while still recovering from a cold is a bad idea. Wheels fell off around mile 14, although pace to HR was much slower from the start. Was full walk mode at mile 20 and pulled the plug at 25. Was brutal after so many months of 50+mile weeks.

  4. #3254
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    Ugh, sorry to hear that. I know your pain. 10 years ago I had aspirations to do a 100-miler. Countless hours running in the dark and the cold all winter. Developed IT band issues a month out from the race and had to bag the whole thing.

  5. #3255
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Ugh, sorry to hear that. I know your pain. 10 years ago I had aspirations to do a 100-miler. Countless hours running in the dark and the cold all winter. Developed IT band issues a month out from the race and had to bag the whole thing.
    Wow, physical issues like the IT band is a whole other issue. I should be able to rest myself for a few days and be fine for the two 100kís I have scheduled next Spring/Summer. I do recall seeing people as I was getting close to finishing a 50 miler in September around hour 9 suffering to finish a 50k being run on the same course. I respected them then but now I now know how they might have been feeling as that would have likely been me if I had walked a couple more laps.

  6. #3256
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    Running, Anyone...?

    Quote Originally Posted by fool View Post
    Now that I've gotten into trail running, I mostly agree. But for the non or less outdoorsy types, it's a great way to accomplish something huge, which is cool.
    Definitely. Itís also weirdly daunting going on those first few trail runs. Access is another issue depending where you live, though we see folks on the trail from the city that train on the road and treadmill during the week and do big trail runs and races on the weekends.

    Re: nose breathing. My nose runs when I exercise, always, regardless of climate, so Iíve never had luck with it. Am I weird or are you all just sucking that stuff down?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  7. #3257
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post

    Re: nose breathing. My nose runs when I exercise, always, regardless of climate, so Iíve never had luck with it. Am I weird or are you all just sucking that stuff down?
    Same, I swear half my fluid loss is via snot rocket

  8. #3258
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    Hah, yeah, also an exercise runny noser. I farmer blow a lot, though it's not as bad in summer.

  9. #3259
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    Last ďlongĒrun before the marathon. Columbia river looking chilly




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #3260
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    Not sure I got much running in on the trail today, but amazing what a couple days will change. Up to 2ft of snow toward the top and crazy wind forced me back from my objective. Still a lot of fun, though and got a good sweat on.

  11. #3261
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    Quote Originally Posted by phatty View Post
    ...and got a good sweat on.
    Um, if you're sweating in those conditions maybe take the jacket off?

  12. #3262
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Um, if you're sweating in those conditions maybe take the jacket off?
    Only a micro fleece 1/4 zip and a t shirt. Wasn't going to strip to just that. It was only 30*, so not terribly cold.

  13. #3263
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    Admittedly, I'm a bit of a furnace and can sweat shirtless well into the 20's. But, if I have a shirt/jacket on and start sweating it comes off immediately because if it gets wet it's not going to be much use when/if I need it again.

  14. #3264
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Admittedly, I'm a bit of a furnace and can sweat shirtless well into the 20's. But, if I have a shirt/jacket on and start sweating it comes off immediately because if it gets wet it's not going to be much use when/if I need it again.
    I didn't even realize I was sweating until I got back to the car. Took my shirts off and they were soaked. I've been working on my layers for winter running/touring and feel like the combo I'm using is working well at keeping me from overheating while keeping me warm enough. Only need a jacket when the wind picks up.

  15. #3265
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    Late update on first go at a marathon. Started running about 10 months ago. Didn't train as much as I should have but happy with completing it. Seattle marathon, finished in 4:26 not fast but lots of room for growth. Thanks for all the tips I've gotten on this forum/thread

    Just a fun thought, how difficult do you think it'd be for me to get to Boston qualifying pace? (usually about 3 hours). Obviously an hour and a half is lot but my training for this marathon consisted of 1 long run and one 3 mile run each week (about 15 miles a week) so pretty minimal and I've only been running for 10 months so I'm thinking I've got lots of room for improvement. 28 years old

  16. #3266
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeachesNCream View Post
    Late update on first go at a marathon. Started running about 10 months ago. Didn't train as much as I should have but happy with completing it. Seattle marathon, finished in 4:26 not fast but lots of room for growth. Thanks for all the tips I've gotten on this forum/thread

    Just a fun thought, how difficult do you think it'd be for me to get to Boston qualifying pace? (usually about 3 hours). Obviously an hour and a half is lot but my training for this marathon consisted of 1 long run and one 3 mile run each week (about 15 miles a week) so pretty minimal and I've only been running for 10 months so I'm thinking I've got lots of room for improvement. 28 years old
    Heck yeah, man. Congrats! No shame in that time. At 28, you got time on your side for training. If you've ever been able to run a 7:30 mile for a 5k, I would suspect with a year or two of training you could get your time way down.

    My marathon made me realize that I don't love road running enough to do it again. I'll stick to trails and half marathons on the road. I'm too old to put in the work necessary when I have a lot of other interests. But if you want it and get a good training schedule, go for it! We'll be cheering you on!

  17. #3267
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    Quote Originally Posted by phatty View Post
    Heck yeah, man. Congrats! No shame in that time. At 28, you got time on your side for training. If you've ever been able to run a 7:30 mile for a 5k, I would suspect with a year or two of training you could get your time way down.

    My marathon made me realize that I don't love road running enough to do it again. I'll stick to trails and half marathons on the road. I'm too old to put in the work necessary when I have a lot of other interests. But if you want it and get a good training schedule, go for it! We'll be cheering you on!
    Thanks man!

    I ran a 5k for time a few weeks before the marathon and it came out to 7:50 pace. This is with zero speed training, 100% of my training was slower than marathon pace.

    I like trail running more but road running where I'm at is so much more convenient. Plus, qualifying for Boston would be cool accomplish. I have come to realize how much time it takes.

  18. #3268
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Admittedly, I'm a bit of a furnace and can sweat shirtless well into the 20's. But, if I have a shirt/jacket on and start sweating it comes off immediately because if it gets wet it's not going to be much use when/if I need it again.
    Letís just call it how it is Dan. You donít like wearing a shirt. Ever.

  19. #3269
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeachesNCream View Post
    Just a fun thought, how difficult do you think it'd be for me to get to Boston qualifying pace? (usually about 3 hours). Obviously an hour and a half is lot but my training for this marathon consisted of 1 long run and one 3 mile run each week (about 15 miles a week) so pretty minimal and I've only been running for 10 months so I'm thinking I've got lots of room for improvement. 28 years old
    Nice job! You'll get a lot faster with increased mileage and structured training if you're able to put in the time and effort (and can avoid injuries). Work up (gradually) to running 5-6 days a week, 50+ miles/week, with intervals and/or tempo runs a couple times a week. Even if your goal is the marathon, do some shorter races (5/10K/HM) so you can see improvement and get a feel for how fast you can go.

  20. #3270
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeachesNCream View Post
    Late update on first go at a marathon. Started running about 10 months ago. Didn't train as much as I should have but happy with completing it. Seattle marathon, finished in 4:26 not fast but lots of room for growth. Thanks for all the tips I've gotten on this forum/thread

    Just a fun thought, how difficult do you think it'd be for me to get to Boston qualifying pace? (usually about 3 hours). Obviously an hour and a half is lot but my training for this marathon consisted of 1 long run and one 3 mile run each week (about 15 miles a week) so pretty minimal and I've only been running for 10 months so I'm thinking I've got lots of room for improvement. 28 years old
    Congrats! That's awesome.

    Difficulty on getting to ~3 hours is hard to say, depending on your (aerobic) background, commitment, time to train, passion, injuries, etc. but frankly there's only way to find out: to try! I wouldn't expect your next marathon to be a BQ but train up for another one and see how it goes. If you can get to 30-50 miles per week, with one long run and one interval session, you'll start to see significant improvements that should carry over to race performance. Also, consider the marathon course you sign up for (elevation profile, spectators, expected temps, etc.)

  21. #3271
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    I should add that, if you are Seattle area, there are at least 2 marathons every year on the Iron Horse trail from Snoqualmie Pass down to North Bend. Both are Boston qualifiers. Easier to get a faster time and way more interesting than running on roads.

  22. #3272
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzworthy View Post
    Letís just call it how it is Dan. You donít like wearing a shirt. Ever.
    It's a public service.

  23. #3273
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    Congrats on the marathon PnC!!!
    It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. ĖErnest Hemingway

  24. #3274
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    PnC, nice job. Seems like the 1st marathon either hooks people or they never run again. As others have said, if you can get to even 30 mi per week consistently you should see a big chunk of time come off. Getting down from like 3:30 to 3:00 is way harder and means doing real thoughtful and dedicated training. Go to the library and read one of the McMillan or Daniels running books. Read it and make a copy of the training plan. Those are tried and true plans to guide true training.

  25. #3275
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeachesNCream View Post
    Late update on first go at a marathon. Started running about 10 months ago. Didn't train as much as I should have but happy with completing it. Seattle marathon, finished in 4:26 not fast but lots of room for growth. Thanks for all the tips I've gotten on this forum/thread

    Just a fun thought, how difficult do you think it'd be for me to get to Boston qualifying pace? (usually about 3 hours). Obviously an hour and a half is lot but my training for this marathon consisted of 1 long run and one 3 mile run each week (about 15 miles a week) so pretty minimal and I've only been running for 10 months so I'm thinking I've got lots of room for improvement. 28 years old
    If you looked at a 2-3yr horizon, with 6-12mo of ramp-up to running 40-60mpw+ and then 1-2yrs of sustained mileage, you should be able to dip into the mid-3hr range, just with consistency (and barring injuries). Getting down to ~3hrs or sub-3 can happen, but would likely take more races/race training, nutrition planning and lifestyle focus - weight, gear, sleep, etc. Nothing crazy, but a commitment to the process. Very likely attainable if you want it!

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