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  1. #1
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    Warhol Documentary on PBS

    Anyone else catch Part 1 last night? I used to be obsessed with all things Warhol, have read just about every biography ever written (and still reread the Diaries from time to time), but this Ric Burns (Ken's brother) documentary is so amazing that it opened my eyes even more. Part 2 is tonight, and I'm sure PBS will rerun it.

    I don't know if we have any art enthusiasts around here, but thought I'd throw it out there. It's also a fascinating study on the evolution of art and the art world (especially in terms of art as commerce), as well as a comment on our times (Warhol's mastery was in recognizing and utilizing these very things in his art).

    For those of you living in New York, I envy that you can walk to MOMA any time you want and sit in the room with all the Soup Cans. I used to do that with the Guernica, when I lived in Madrid - just sit in the room, contemplating.
    .

  2. #2
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    What do you contemplate with the Soup cans? Lunch?

    I always preferred his Marilyn Monroe in the "Improved Lithograph" series.



    You gotta love the Bimmer best, tho:


  3. #3
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    I always contemplate lunch

    The soup cans are super interesting, to me. Each can represents a shift in consumerism: a different flavor for each person (why would one person choose bean soup over chicken?); the immediacy with which you can eat something filling; the ability to ship and transfer foods efficiently - this was a change in our world, at that time. The more you look at them, the more you (I) become curious them, and our world.

    I love the Marilyn series, too, but for different reasons. I love that she looks completely different in each canvas because of the silkscreening process and placement of color; I'm fascinated that he began that series on the day of her suicide - making her more of a pop icon than she ever was, posthumously; I am drawn to his interest in the hollywood star.
    .

  4. #4
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    I never really liked his art a whole lot- but I have always had enormous respect for his impact on contemporary art. I was flipping channels last night and stumbled upon that halfway through. I ended up watching the whole thing. I did find alot of the commentary interesting - on how he was so masterful in capturing not only the popular image but the popular perception of that image.

  5. #5
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    I dig the electric chair series. He anethesized a nasty act.

    But, (I didn't even know this was on - I'm sure it will be on DVD soon, if not already), he did his best stuff when he became his own art work later in life. Walking, talking (mincing) celebrity art work. Predated our obsession with celebrity.

  6. #6
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    I am very interested in his whole "factory" gang and the Edie Sedgwick era.

    They were a truly messed up bunch of people, but really there was a very clear message they were projecting in the film and the art IMO: "Society is truly messed up."

    Sprite
    "I call it reveling in natures finest element. Water in its pristine form. Straight from the heavens. We bathe in it, rejoicing in the fullest." --BZ

  7. #7
    the warhol museum in pittsburgh is awesome. they've got the 'time capsules' on display, tons of other exhibits and often show films. a while ago, i saw a film titled 'blowjob' that was nothing more than a fixed-frame on a dude's face as he evidently was getting his knob slobbered. hmm... if anyone is ever in pittsburgh, the warhol museum is worth a look-see.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lostinthetrees

    by the time he was doing the "Pete Rose" series, Andy had long worn out his welcome...imho

    Never at the trendiest night clubs.

    Jasper Johns and Rauchenberg did much more interesting stuff (as contemporaries), but didn't have the PR. Or the entourage of weirdos.

  9. #9
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    A few movies to put in your Netflix cue for fictional representation:

    "I Shot Andy Warhol", with Jared Harris doing a good Warhol, "Basquit", the first movie made by Julian Schnabel with David Bowie doing a very cool Warhol, and just a little scene in "The Doors", with that weirdo Crispin Glover as Andy drooling over Morrison.

  10. #10
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    I'm a big Warhol fan.
    Didn't know there was a documentary (I don't have TV)
    Bump this up when it's available on DVD or something.

    I can't hear Lou Reed without thinking of Andy and the Factory.

    Double agreed on Benny's movie list.

    That Bitch that shot him is still running around trying to sell her "Manifesto".

    Ever see Avendon's portrait of Andy's scars? Chilling.
    Is it true he died a gay virgin?

  11. #11
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    That is very possible. He was very much a voyeur, hence the "beautiful people" around him, but also a devout, church going Catholic.

    I just remembered a few of his quotes. He considered New Years Eve "amateur night" which I use every year, and when asked his opinion about Saturday Night Live, he had a low one, because "anyone watching TV on Saturday night had to be quite boring, anyway."

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up

    Finally out on DVD and rented. Very well done, if a little over the top gushy about Andy's drawing talents. Must-see for contemporary art fans.

  13. #13
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    There's another Warhol related doc making the film festival circuit... supposed to be really good:
    http://www.awalkintothesea.com/

  14. #14
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    Was watching some VU vids and happened across this. Comments section is interesting. It was all way before my time and really don’t know what most of it was about but for any interest:

  15. #15
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    I always felt that Andy was a leech of the talent he was able to cajule around him. And lotsa dick. Never had much respect for that man.

  16. #16
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    I fondly recall going with friends to midnight movies to see Andy Warhol's Frankenstein (aka Flesh For Frankenstein) and Andy Warhol's Dracula (aka Blood For Dracula). I think Warhol's involvement was limited to lending his name, (definitely sold some tickets), and maybe a producer's credit, but the films were a riot.





    I guess they may both be available for streaming on AMC+

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