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  1. #1676
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    Jan 2013
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    Northern BC
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    Might be a more productive idea to look at the business practices of companies in the present day. Let's start with labour practices and contributions to climate change of the very companies that any of us on the pension train are highly likely / almost certainly invested in.

  2. #1677
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    Jun 2010
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    Powder Mountain
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    791
    Quote Originally Posted by Angle Parking View Post
    Might be a more productive idea to look at the business practices of companies in the present day. Let's start with labour practices and contributions to climate change of the very companies that any of us on the pension train are highly likely / almost certainly invested in.
    get a load of this guy

  3. #1678
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Big Sky/Moonlight Basin
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    12,230
    I must be in the wrong thread, I was looking for the Chainsaw Thread to post a pic of the saw I added to my quiver yesterday. Looks like I stumbled into the Genocide Thread by accident. Maybe I will post my chainsaw pics somewhere else ?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "Zee damn fat skis are ruining zee piste !" -Oscar Schevlin

    "Hike up your skirt and grow a dick you fucking crybaby" -what Bunion said to Harry at the top of The Headwaters

  4. #1679
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    Oct 2008
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    Wenatchee
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    11,580
    Quote Originally Posted by Hood26 View Post
    Itís not a Ford vs Chevy comparison. Itís a Volvo or VW/BMW/Benz comparison. However these companyís positions are everything that Stihl isnít. They have publicly admitted culpability and made moves for repair. Here is Daimler:

    https://www.daimler.com/company/trad...1933-1945.html

    Yes, Stihl has a larger dealer network, but any Stihl shop will work on and be able to get parts for a Husky.

    Husky doesnít change shit just to change shit. Got a parts Husky saw? The parts will probably work. Got a Stihl parts saw of even the same model, good luck they probably re-engineered the bolt pattern.

    Buy an ugly Stihl if you want. You will spend more $$ all the way around for not a better saw.

    I will save any comment on ski industry ties to Nazi slave labor for a different time and place.

    Just so I am not all political and argumentative today here are some helpful tips for saws:

    1. saw running like shit? Change filter (air and fuel) and plug, leave the carb alone unless you know how to tune
    2. Donít cut above your shoulders (unless you are a skilled arborist like our friend RBTree with the right equipment
    3. Never disable the chain brake
    4. Keep your thumbs around both grips
    5. Donít put your chain in the dirt, roll the logs when cutting firewood. If the chain went in the dirt, time for a new one
    6. Knock down your risers with a flat file. Often high risers are why the chain wonít cut well
    7. Two best way to blowup a saw are dull chains and shitty mix
    8. Full skip, chisel, chain is best if you have a big enough saw and access to a grinder
    9. Watch your toes and never rest your saw on your thigh
    Iím confused, #6 did you mean rakers?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  5. #1680
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    807
    My ongoing series of historical awareness of genocide is no longer being offered in this space, so letís see your chainsaw.

    Harry, what did you get and for what purpose? New or used? Already broke in? Any upcoming mods? Letís see the pics and they better be dirty.
    "Let's be careful out there."

  6. #1681
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    Aug 2018
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    807
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    I’m confused, #6 did you mean rakers?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I meant “riders.” Thanks for catching that typo. So, yes I meant “rakers” Riders=rakers and they are often ignores in the sharpening process by new operators.

    http://www.madsens1.com/bnc_depth_gauge.htm
    "Let's be careful out there."

  7. #1682
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    Jan 2016
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    Greg_o
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    Newbish question in regards to a wedge cut to control where a large leaning branch falls:

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    Wow my crappy pic might actually be oriented correctly!!

    So I've got a large willow tree that I've been slowly taking down this winter, most cuts are pretty easy but there's one very large heavy branch that leans directly towards the house. The amazingly artistic illustration sort of shows what I'm talking about.

    I have a basic understanding of making a wedge cut and felling limbs in a chosen direction. This limb however has me a bit worried.

    If I want it to fall roughly along path A, would I need to put a bias on the wedge pointing more towards the fence? (I'd rather fix a fence than siding and windows lol)

    and/or - instead of making the wedge cuts and felling cuts on a horizontal plane, can I angle these cuts a little so the hinge isn't perfectly horizontal, but rather the lower part of the hinge facing more towards the fence? (hope that makes sense)

  8. #1683
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    Nov 2007
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    So. VT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Newbish question in regards to a wedge cut to control where a large leaning branch falls:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Wow my crappy pic might actually be oriented correctly!!

    So I've got a large willow tree that I've been slowly taking down this winter, most cuts are pretty easy but there's one very large heavy branch that leans directly towards the house. The amazingly artistic illustration sort of shows what I'm talking about.

    I have a basic understanding of making a wedge cut and felling limbs in a chosen direction. This limb however has me a bit worried.

    If I want it to fall roughly along path A, would I need to put a bias on the wedge pointing more towards the fence? (I'd rather fix a fence than siding and windows lol)

    and/or - instead of making the wedge cuts and felling cuts on a horizontal plane, can I angle these cuts a little so the hinge isn't perfectly horizontal, but rather the lower part of the hinge facing more towards the fence? (hope that makes sense)
    A pic from the ground would help more then a top down sketch....

    Show the lean

  9. #1684
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    Jan 2016
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    Greg_o
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    You mean that illustration doesn't suffice lol? K hold on, pics in coming..

  10. #1685
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    You mean that illustration doesn't suffice lol? K hold on, pics in coming..
    I mean I'll be honest, never wedge cut a limb to control direction.

    How big is the limb? Is it more vertical ( what I've always called a leader) or is it straight out?

  11. #1686
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    Jan 2016
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    Hope this helps. The branch in question is in a bundle of smaller stuff that shouldn't be a problem to remove before proceeding.

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    Another perspective

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    Hand for scale on the branch in question.

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  12. #1687
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    So. VT
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    I'd call that a leader....

    Put a LEVEL notch in direction "A", maybe a little more toward the fence. Put a rope on it as high as you can go above the cut and add some tension in that direction, as it does look tight in there and insurance can't hurt.

    Too bad it's not larger, you could easily wedge it in the right direction.

    Disclaimer: not my fault if you crush the fence, your wife's arbor or the neighbors toy poodle.

  13. #1688
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    Quote Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post

    Too bad it's not larger, you could easily wedge it in the right direction.
    Sorry I am so confused by this line. Is this example not wedging it?

  14. #1689
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Sorry I am so confused by this line. Is this example not wedging it?
    Felling wedges.

    You do your notch cut, start the felling cut, pound a wedge in and continue to cut. Give the wedge a couple whacks as you go and it lifts the tree to overcome lean.

    Only works if there is enought tree for the notch, hing, bar and felling wedge. Your tree looks too small.

    1st image I stole from the Google:

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    Sometimes I bore cut, pound the wedges in and then cut the trigger. IMHO things more of an advanced method.

    I'm a hack, but have been burning firewood my whole life and have made some errors in felling that thankfully I was able to learn from. The sketchy ones work out, as I'm hyper attentive.

  15. #1690
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    Greg_o
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    This is the image I've been basing everything I've said so far on. But you're saying don't do that because it's too narrow.

    Sorry to get so circular - how does the Level notch you recommend differ from the posted illustration?

  16. #1691
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    Nov 2007
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    So. VT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    This is the image I've been basing everything I've said so far on. But you're saying don't do that because it's too narrow.

    Sorry to get so circular - how does the Level notch you recommend differ from the posted illustration?

    It doesn't. If you are facing the notch it should be level left to right. Otherwise you can put twist into it, which in your case could be bad (from what I see).

    EDIT: another stolen pic:

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    Not the notch is level

    I don't think that tree is big enough to face cut, back cut, wedge and fell. But I'm not in front of it. The rope acts the same as the felling wedges, it just serves to pull things the right direction.

    For frame of reference, last winter I took down a birch and hickory that were twisted up along my power line. Too small for the wedges, but some tension with the rope as I cut (tension, cut, repeat) pulled a heavy leaner away from catastrophe.

    Tomorrow when it is light out I'll try for a pic of a 12"+ oak leader I need to drop this winter. The natural fall puts it close to a propane tank, so I will add a wedge to nudge it in the safe direction.

  17. #1692
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    Understood, thank you very much for taking the time to explain this to me. tension, cut, repeat..

  18. #1693
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    Aug 2006
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    The chainsaw thread...

    Tension, cut, repeat, etc.: make sure itís not going to land on you when tensioning it or if you need to give the rope a final tug to pull the leader down. Also, donít bounce the rope, better to give it a steady tug.

  19. #1694
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    Aug 2006
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    I couldnít just drop this leader with a notch/hinge because it would have landed on my deck and roof. I rigged a cord into a notch, then through another notch on another leader, and a bunch of wraps around that pine. I did a ďsalamiĒ style cut with a bore cut leaving strap holding wood on top and bottom. It all got a bit complicated when my chain got pinched in the bore cut and I had to use my bigger saw (that needs a carb adjustment) to finish the job. The rigging worked great!

  20. #1695
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    Well great thanks guys, practice round went perfect! On to the big guy..

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    Kind of an incredible feeling - slowly getting the wedge cut as perfect as you can, then inching in with the felling cut, tension, pull slowly.. boom! Controlled chaos.

  21. #1696
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    Jan 2016
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    Greg_o
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    Big ones down! This is kinda fun. Thanks again for the pointers. Fence and windows are still intact. Raspberries, along the back fence - well they good a mid winter prune.

  22. #1697
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    Dec 2003
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Big ones down! This is kinda fun. Thanks again for the pointers. Fence and windows are still intact. Raspberries, along the back fence - well they good a mid winter prune.

    Well done! This is coming from a guy who has worked aloft for almost 50 years.

  23. #1698
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle
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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
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    I couldnít just drop this leader with a notch/hinge because it would have landed on my deck and roof. I rigged a cord into a notch, then through another notch on another leader, and a bunch of wraps around that pine. I did a ďsalamiĒ style cut with a bore cut leaving strap holding wood on top and bottom. It all got a bit complicated when my chain got pinched in the bore cut and I had to use my bigger saw (that needs a carb adjustment) to finish the job. The rigging worked great!
    Excellent. I've hung many a storm leaner, and angle/salami cut the base.... some as large as 100' plus. I then repeat the process, cutting sections off the butt, until the top can be laid out. Often, the process takes hours, at least two groundies running the lines. A $2800 lowering device, maybe another bollard device for friction, and as many as three ropes, and 1-2 rigging blocks....no trunk wraps, of course. My main line (250' -- cost over $900--yikes!) for tip tying big stuff is rated at 31000 lb tensile at 9/16th... it has a HMWPE spectra (plasma, by PS Ropes) core..zero stretch so not to be shock loaded. Any dynamic loads, we then use lines up to 3/4" rated at ~22k lb.

  24. #1699
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    Aug 2006
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    7,354
    Quote Originally Posted by rbtree View Post
    Excellent. I've hung many a storm leaner, and angle/salami cut the base.... some as large as 100' plus. I then repeat the process, cutting sections off the butt, until the top can be laid out. Often, the process takes hours, at least two groundies running the lines. A $2800 lowering device, maybe another bollard device for friction, and as many as three ropes, and 1-2 rigging blocks....no trunk wraps, of course. My main line (250' -- cost over $900--yikes!) for tip tying big stuff is rated at 31000 lb tensile at 9/16th... it has a HMWPE spectra (plasma, by PS Ropes) core..zero stretch so not to be shock loaded. Any dynamic loads, we then use lines up to 3/4" rated at ~22k lb.
    The cord that you previously recommended worked great. i also bought a weight and throwline, which has gotten a bunch of use.

    trunk wrap.... i wasn't aware that was passe. it worked well for me and it's what i learned to do. i have seen friction devices used but have no experience.

    i rigged the tiptie in the notch on the leader in the autumn and let the kids use it as a swing for a week or three. i finished the rigging before winter weather arrived in case the leader failed. That could have been a good decision as my area (Sierra foothills) had some severe tree failures in the big winter storm on Dec 26 (it's still a mess out there).

  25. #1700
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    Jan 2016
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    Have a laugh on me, folks.

    Been slowly hacking away at that willow and needed a new chain. 50 CAD for the recommended model. Installed today. 3 inches into it's first cut and I find there's rebar or something metal imbedded in the stump. The first few inches were glorious - new chain feel I guess. Seconds later, it's crap.

    Guess I'll learn how to use the files. Seems so tedious but it sucks buying (and instantly destroying) 50 dollar chains.

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