Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    20,128

    thread on cassette, single speed and track?

    Basically does a track cog (fixed gear) exist for a thread on hub? can I take a old road bike, and if the spacing works, thread off the cassette, and thread on a fixed gear on to that?

    thought that it would be a cheap, easy way to try the fix gear thing.

    what about a way to "enslave" a free hub body so it is not free anymore? IS that doable?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    Surly makes a part called the fixxer that replaces the freehub body and allows you to thread on a track cog.

    If you are threading a track cog onto a hub freebody, its still going to be a freebody.

    then there is the whole issue of proper chain tension....are you running horizontal/semi vert dropouts?

    And finally, dont do it, unless you are prepared to buy a studded belt.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    20,128
    thanks,

    idealy I'd like to just thread something onto the hub of an old, crappy, road bike, and if it works great, strip parts from the bike at that point. I'll have brakes still to try it out.

    If the bike is so old that it has a thread on cassette, it will have a horizontal, or at least angled dropout, so I can get the tension right

    so do the track cogs have the same thread spacing and work the same way as a BMX type single speed (just not free wheel)?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Tawho Citti
    Posts
    1,533
    I think that Cantdog rocks something like this:


    Don't you work at a shop? You should be able to source a cheap fixie wheel for not too much money. It won't be the best thing out there, but fixed gears + cobbling things together = potential for pain, or so i've found.

    A track hub is different from an older hub with a thread on freewheel. A track hub has two set of threads that oppose each other, one for the cog (right-hand thread), and one for the lockring (left-hand thread) to keep the cog from backing off the hub.
    Last edited by Darkside; 05-04-2006 at 10:34 AM.
    It's heartbreaking to see a chick who's too anorexic.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkside
    I think that Cantdog rocks something like this:

    Definately not. the only way I would consider owning a fixed gear is if I lived by a track. One thing you will never find me doing is riding around with cards in my spokes, tight jeans, and half wrapped handlebars. In fact, its fair to say I fucking hate fixed gear riders.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    20,128
    Don't you work at a shop?

    thanks man,

    ya I'm a shop monkey, but in the banff area, i deal with lots more new stuff, and the few road bikes I see are new stuff, not older stuff. bleeding hayes and rebiulding marzoks are what we do, not this stuff


    You should be able to source a cheap fixie wheel for not too much money. It won't be the best thing out there, but fixed gears + cobbling things together = potential for pain, or so i've found.


    thanks, was hoping to just buy a single cog, cheap/free bike, adn try it out, might do that way, but then I need the wheel, and the cog/lockring


    A track hub is different from an older hub with a thread on freewheel. A track hub has two set of threads that oppose each other, one for the cog (right-hand thread), and one for the lockring (left-hand thread) to keep the cog from backing off the hub.


    thanks thats what I was looking for


    I think they are dumb too, but I thought that about a mountainbike single speeed, and have ridden that more this year then the new prophet I just got. something about it is nice, simple, works, less parts. also slows me down so I can ride with girlguide.

    just wanted to try something new/different


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    Quote Originally Posted by mntlion
    Don't you work at a shop?

    thanks man,

    ya I'm a shop monkey, but in the banff area, i deal with lots more new stuff, and the few road bikes I see are new stuff, not older stuff. bleeding hayes and rebiulding marzoks are what we do, not this stuff


    You should be able to source a cheap fixie wheel for not too much money. It won't be the best thing out there, but fixed gears + cobbling things together = potential for pain, or so i've found.


    thanks, was hoping to just buy a single cog, cheap/free bike, adn try it out, might do that way, but then I need the wheel, and the cog/lockring


    A track hub is different from an older hub with a thread on freewheel. A track hub has two set of threads that oppose each other, one for the cog (right-hand thread), and one for the lockring (left-hand thread) to keep the cog from backing off the hub.


    thanks thats what I was looking for


    I think they are dumb too, but I thought that about a mountainbike single speeed, and have ridden that more this year then the new prophet I just got. something about it is nice, simple, works, less parts. also slows me down so I can ride with girlguide.

    just wanted to try something new/different
    They make a good training tool, but I was thinking it would be used more as a commuter(like most are here) in which case I think brakes and a freewheel are wicked smaht.

    You could always build up a single speed road bike.

    Or check ebay, there are always track rear wheels for sale. Just check to see what your rear spacing is, if its an old bike its probably 120.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    20,128
    thanks mang


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    retired
    Posts
    12,482
    if you want to do it on the cheap, get a 6 or 7spd freewheel type rear wheel, put a cog from a suntour freewheel on it as the fixed cog, and use a BB lockring. all you need to do is redish the rear wheel, and yer good
    go for rob

    www.dpsskis.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    15,672
    Quote Originally Posted by marshalolson
    if you want to do it on the cheap, get a 6 or 7spd freewheel type rear wheel, put a cog from a suntour freewheel on it as the fixed cog, and use a BB lockring. all you need to do is redish the rear wheel, and yer good
    Can you re-dish the rear wheel far enough for this to work? (enough spoke thread length on the drive side, and not so much spoke length on the non-drive side that the spokes will poke through the nipples and flat the tube?)

    I suppose the less dish the rear wheel has to begin with, the better. Why not a 5 speed freewheel? (thread pitch issues?)
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    4,628
    Quote Originally Posted by CantDog
    Surly makes a part called the fixxer that replaces the freehub body and allows you to thread on a track cog.
    Wouldn't backpedalling cause the cog to unthread? Wild. I wonder if that actually works.

    Quote Originally Posted by CantDog
    And finally, dont do it, unless you are prepared to buy a studded belt.
    Basically, he's right. Don't do it.

  12. #12
    BLOODSWEATSTEEL Guest
    If you know someone handy with a stick- Weld up a BMX freewheel. I wouldn't recommend it, but the old Suntour BMX fw's can take on some serious destruction. I'd just build up a wheel with a crappy BMX hub and a longer axle/more spacers and go from there.

    On second thought, no I wouldn't. Fixed gears suck.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    my own little world
    Posts
    744
    I've never tried what your thinkin bout, but always wanted to. If you have an old freewheel hub you could do just like marshall said with the suntour cog, or, use an actual track cog, (yes the thread pitch is the same as a freewheel), and the bb lockring as suggested. You stand the risk of unscrewing this combination so you better have some brakes on the bike. I would try to add a second bb lockring on the hub, that way you might be able to tighten the 2 lockrings against each other (like a cone/axel adjustment). One more thing you will need to do is, remove a spacer or 2 from the axel on the drive side and reinstall it/them on the non-drive side first, then re-dish the wheel. If you don't do this you'll never achieve proper chainline, and will most certainly drop chain. Good luck, let us know if it works. I always see road bikes from the 70's at Vinney's that would be perfect for this.
    The coefficent of desireability is inversly proportionate to the degree of availability.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Ut
    Posts
    1,568
    What marshal and 1wsguy said basically. There is a thing called a dans adapter thathen has threads for you the thread the track cog and lockring onto. I've herd or some people just using superglue to keep the track cog on with and not even using a bb lockring, but you'd better be sure that you've got the right gatio first as it is not coming off. There was an article on Sheldon Brown's website about Welding the pawl mechanism on a hub with a freewheel to make it fixed too. Surly Fixxer seems more reliable though.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html

    http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed/index.html

    Cant: I don't ride a fixie, but I know lots of people that do and none of them are hipsters, its good commuting and training. I know a guy who just built up a 1st gen usps frame into a fixie, talk about a sweet ride. Fuck hipsters.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    retired
    Posts
    12,482
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra
    Can you re-dish the rear wheel far enough for this to work? (enough spoke thread length on the drive side, and not so much spoke length on the non-drive side that the spokes will poke through the nipples and flat the tube?)

    I suppose the less dish the rear wheel has to begin with, the better. Why not a 5 speed freewheel? (thread pitch issues?)
    in theroy yes, but a 5spd rear wheel is really narrow, so in even a 20 year old frame, you have to crush the dropouts. 5spd r. wheels you also tend to really suck balls anyway, just cause they were shit new.
    go for rob

    www.dpsskis.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    Quote Originally Posted by powwrangler
    What marshal and 1wsguy said basically. There is a thing called a dans adapter thathen has threads for you the thread the track cog and lockring onto. I've herd or some people just using superglue to keep the track cog on with and not even using a bb lockring, but you'd better be sure that you've got the right gatio first as it is not coming off. There was an article on Sheldon Brown's website about Welding the pawl mechanism on a hub with a freewheel to make it fixed too. Surly Fixxer seems more reliable though.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html

    http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed/index.html

    Cant: I don't ride a fixie, but I know lots of people that do and none of them are hipsters, its good commuting and training. I know a guy who just built up a 1st gen usps frame into a fixie, talk about a sweet ride. Fuck hipsters.

    I have no problem with fixies as training tools, what I cant stand is the people who ride their drexeltown special down to the coffee shop and talk about how they are the soul of the sport.

    And for city riding, I'd rather have two brakes. Leaving the city today I got a door opened in front of me and was within 2 inches of going through her passenger side glass.(car opened door on the left of me.) The only thing that saved my ass was a set of DA brakes and quick manuvering.

    It was a $5k demo bike too, that would of been hard to explain to the shop.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Ut
    Posts
    1,568
    Nice cant, what was this demo you speak of?

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Tawho Citti
    Posts
    1,533
    I would not recommend doing what marshall suggested. Track hubs are designed a certain way for a reason. If you use a thread on cog and a bb lockring there is a definite chance of your freewheel coming unthreaded and jamming the chain into the seatstay/dropout and possibly dumping you.

    Cant, you should mask your jealousy a bit better. Honestly though, if I was too much of a pussy to ride a track bike, I would probably act the same way.
    It's heartbreaking to see a chick who's too anorexic.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    Quote Originally Posted by powwrangler
    Nice cant, what was this demo you speak of?

    A Guru Maestro...retails for 6800, not the initial $5k that I thought.

    I'll have the full test report up this evening on its 135 mile/12k feet of climbing 'demo' ride. I'm thinking short of racing it, there wasnt a better way to rag on someone elses bike.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    retired
    Posts
    12,482
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkside
    I would not recommend doing what marshall suggested. Track hubs are designed a certain way for a reason. If you use a thread on cog and a bb lockring there is a definite chance of your freewheel coming unthreaded and jamming the chain into the seatstay/dropout and possibly dumping you.
    ??????

    i have at least 10000 miles over the last 9 years on this setup.

    no dumb belt, nor any super tight jeans though



    edit: track cogs on these wheels is no good becasue they take up too much thread so you can't get a lockring on.

    edit #2: darkside, still confounded, over the last few years i have setup a few people every week on such setups and never heard any issues ever.
    Last edited by marshalolson; 05-08-2006 at 07:44 AM.
    go for rob

    www.dpsskis.com

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Da 'Ver
    Posts
    1,516
    Quote Originally Posted by CantDog

    It was a $5k demo bike too, that would of been hard to explain to the shop.
    Was there carbon bits on it?
    "It's too bad that a lot of people have never experienced the feeling of rollerblading in the cool air of a summer evening"
    TheQuietStorm

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Under the bridge, down by the river
    Posts
    4,611
    Quote Originally Posted by flowtron
    Was there carbon bits on it?
    It had an aluminum stem. Thats about it.

    I think I've changed my mind--if only I had 7k to blow on a bike.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sea Level
    Posts
    3,794
    Fixed gear bikes are fun. Don't listen to nerds who hate, they wear Dockers to work.
    The trumpet scatters its awful sound Over the graves of all lands Summoning all before the throne

    Death and mankind shall be stunned When Nature arises To give account before the Judge

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Tawho Citti
    Posts
    1,533
    Quote Originally Posted by marshalolson
    ??????

    i have at least 10000 miles over the last 9 years on this setup.

    no dumb belt, nor any super tight jeans though



    edit: track cogs on these wheels is no good becasue they take up too much thread so you can't get a lockring on.

    edit #2: darkside, still confounded, over the last few years i have setup a few people every week on such setups and never heard any issues ever.
    Are these on true track bikes, or road-fixie conversions with brakes? If you have brakes, you can get away with this setup, but w/out brakes you would spin the cog off trying to slow down.
    It's heartbreaking to see a chick who's too anorexic.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Koots
    Posts
    584
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkside View Post
    Are these on true track bikes, or road-fixie conversions with brakes? If you have brakes, you can get away with this setup, but w/out brakes you would spin the cog off trying to slow down.
    Even if your cog did spin off its not going to be to big of a deal... it justs locks up the pedals kind of like a skid. I couriered ie: rode a 74-100 kms daily - with a system similar to Marshals for a while and never had any problems.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •