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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigerstripe40 View Post
    of the different batch's I have done, I have not noticed an appreciable differnce between liquid yeast and dry yeast.

    looking through my notes, my best batches of home brew were made with the SafeAle Pink packet dry yeast. I made a starter with 1 cup of water, with 1/2 cup of dry malt extract disolved in it. The yeast was placed in this when the temp got down to 70 degrees or so and I allowed it to proof during my wort boil.

    I have not noticed an appreciable difference in beers when using PacMan, or White labs liquid yeasts. Wyeast has made some differences, but worth the cost?
    Not really.

    I think you'll find that the more you get into it the only way to make nice "clone" beers, or true "style" specific beers you'll need the style specific yeasts. I guess it depends on what you're looking to do. I am a HUGE Wyeast fan and think it is well worth the cost. White labs I was never thrilled about, and I too have had good results with dry yeasts.

    I still stand by the suggestion of upping the ante to liquid yeasts. It is a pain to make the starter cultures days ahead of time and plan brew days, but trust me the results are different. I dont think you'll see many "contest" winners using dry yeast, nor will you see any of the craft breweries using it. I think that tells you something.

    I think no matter what yeast you use if you follow proper sanitizing techniques and can follow a recipe you wont find better beer in any store on the planet. FRESH, TASTY, and best of all....MADE WITH YOUR OWN 2 Hands.

    Now...dont take me for some "beer purist" as i think many would argue with me about how extract brewing isnt "real" brewing, but i dont believe thats true. My award winners have all been extract brews, and all grain brewing is a LOT of work and super tricky for the first few times.

    Happy brewing!
    Last edited by Skidog; 10-28-2008 at 08:54 AM.
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  2. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    I think you'll find that the more you get into it the only way to make nice "clone" beers, or true "style" specific beers you'll need the style specific yeasts. I guess it depends on what you're looking to do. I am a HUGE Wyeast fan and think it is well worth the cost. White labs I was never thrilled about, and I too have had good results with dry yeasts.

    I still stand by the suggestion of upping the ante to liquid yeasts. It is a pain to make the starter cultures days ahead of time and plan brew days, but trust me the results are different. I dont think you'll see many "contest" winners using dry yeast, nor will you see any of the craft breweries using it. I think that tells you something.

    I think no matter what yeast you use if you follow proper sanitizing techniques and can follow a recipe you wont find better beer in any store on the planet. FRESH, TASTY, and best of all....MADE WITH YOUR OWN 2 Hands.

    Now...dont take me for some "beer purist" as i think many would argue with me about how extract brewing isnt "real" brewing, but i dont believe thats true. My award winners have all been extract brews, and all grain brewing is a LOT of work and super tricky for the first few times.

    Happy brewing!
    I have also had good success with both liquid and dry, but I like how the liquid usually becomes active in less than 24 hours (most times more like 12 hours) without using a yeast starter. Usually when I brew it is dependent on other plans falling through so yeast starters really aren't an option.

    I like doing AG but it is a PITA sometimes--especially when you need to boil three different pots b/c your kettle only holds 5 gallons!
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  3. #128
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    i'll agree with the comments about dry vs. liquid. i've used mostly liquid and have been trying to do starters depending on how "big" the beer is but have recently used dry a few times as the recipe calls for it. also agree on being able to brew great beers with extract/partial mash. only recently have gone to all grain and (depending on your set-up) really isn't that different than a partial mash. it's also (typically) a lot less expensive (once you get the extra equipment-mainly a big kettle and mash-tun) although i'm planning on brewing a batch this wknd that'll cost me about $30....just for the hops .

  4. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by criscam View Post
    i'll agree with the comments about dry vs. liquid. i've used mostly liquid and have been trying to do starters depending on how "big" the beer is but have recently used dry a few times as the recipe calls for it. also agree on being able to brew great beers with extract/partial mash. only recently have gone to all grain and (depending on your set-up) really isn't that different than a partial mash. it's also (typically) a lot less expensive (once you get the extra equipment-mainly a big kettle and mash-tun) although i'm planning on brewing a batch this wknd that'll cost me about $30....just for the hops .
    Yeah I just brewed an IPA with 5 ounces of hops total (20$ at the beer nut). I can't wait to have my own place so I can set up a killer hop garden, buy grains in bulk, and really cut down the costs!

    Even my AG brews are starting to run between 30 and 50 bones depending on how big it is and how much hops I use. The kits are usually in the 20's (I think, anyways).
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  5. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigJay View Post
    Yeah I just brewed an IPA with 5 ounces of hops total (20$ at the beer nut). I can't wait to have my own place so I can set up a killer hop garden, buy grains in bulk, and really cut down the costs!

    Even my AG brews are starting to run between 30 and 50 bones depending on how big it is and how much hops I use. The kits are usually in the 20's (I think, anyways).
    Just so you know....growing hops isnt hard, but when its flower hops you'll need MUCH more than with pellets (which I assume you are using), it will also be extermely hard to determine the bitterness units of the hops which is critical. Hops are also in the same family as the "wacky tabacky".

    Growing hops for the homebrewer is another "hobby" at best, but not very practical for use in the brews.

    A note on the buying grains in bulk as well, but in theory it sounds like a great idea, but unless you are brewing the same styles over and over or doing all grain you'll have a LOT of extra grain. Perhaps make some bread as well? WITH the homebrew...now thats tasty stuff...try it with a chocolate stout..man is it good.
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  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    A note on the buying grains in bulk as well, but in theory it sounds like a great idea, but unless you are brewing the same styles over and over or doing all grain you'll have a LOT of extra grain.
    agreed. anyone know how much grain you would have to buy to make it worth buying in bulk. would obvioulsy need a grain mill. also, how long does grain keep? might be beneficial as most of the beers i brew call for 80-90% of some kind of pale malt. i'm usually not too picky what brand.

  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by criscam View Post
    agreed. anyone know how much grain you would have to buy to make it worth buying in bulk. would obvioulsy need a grain mill. also, how long does grain keep? might be beneficial as most of the beers i brew call for 80-90% of some kind of pale malt. i'm usually not too picky what brand.

    Grain should last a LONG time if stored in a cool dry spot. The morms here are REALLY into food storage...they store grain sometimes up to 20 years....

    cool/dry is KEY.....and you'd probably need to buy a 50lb bag is my guess....if all grain brewing it shouldnt be too hard to go through that.

    good luck...peak ale season is upon us....
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  8. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Just so you know....growing hops isnt hard, but when its flower hops you'll need MUCH more than with pellets (which I assume you are using), it will also be extermely hard to determine the bitterness units of the hops which is critical. Hops are also in the same family as the "wacky tabacky".

    Growing hops for the homebrewer is another "hobby" at best, but not very practical for use in the brews.

    A note on the buying grains in bulk as well, but in theory it sounds like a great idea, but unless you are brewing the same styles over and over or doing all grain you'll have a LOT of extra grain. Perhaps make some bread as well? WITH the homebrew...now thats tasty stuff...try it with a chocolate stout..man is it good.

    I didn't know that about the hops--I did figure it would be tough to figure out AAU's but whatever--a new hobby! The only reason why I haven't tried growing hops yet is that I rent my place and my landlord would lose a screw.

    For the grains I was thinking of buying the base grain in bulk--ie muntons 2-row or something that you need 8 - 10 lbs of every batch you brew. I'm a ways off from doing that though--a kegerator and kegging is coming first.
    Just ski down there and jump of a somethin' fer cryin' out loud!

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  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigJay View Post
    I didn't know that about the hops--I did figure it would be tough to figure out AAU's but whatever--a new hobby! The only reason why I haven't tried growing hops yet is that I rent my place and my landlord would lose a screw.

    For the grains I was thinking of buying the base grain in bulk--ie muntons 2-row or something that you need 8 - 10 lbs of every batch you brew. I'm a ways off from doing that though--a kegerator and kegging is coming first.

    Kegs = way to go.....

    As for the grains..if you are going to do all grain brewing then I think its a logical step buying grains in bulk. for the extract brewer its overkill.

    Have fun and enjoy the brews!
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  10. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigJay View Post
    a kegerator and kegging is coming first.

    ditto.
    78

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Kegs = way to go.....

    Have fun and enjoy the brews!
    2nded.

    the reason I took some time off from beer making is that bottling is such a PITA.
    I bought some corny kegs, and a small refrigerator and started kegging myhome brew. SOOO much better. THough I go through it much faster....
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo View Post
    It doesn't behave well until it's going mach retarded.

  12. #137
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    For bulk grains, I only buy base malt in bulk. Everything else I keep only a few lbs around of. try to use them within 6 months and store them closed and out of the moisture and they do better. Stale malt tastes kinda soft rather than crisp. It'll still make beer but not as fresh tasting.

    I use Crisp maris otter as my base malt for most ales and use Weyerman or Durst pils for german and belgian types. Bulk cuts price by about 50% if you aren't shipping the sacks and pick them up local.

    The beer that just hit my fermentor on saturday afternoon was 12 lbs pale, 12 lb wheat, 0.5 carapils and 0.5 crystal 60. Sterling and willamette hops to 75 IBu. OG = 1.094 for 6 gallons. stylewise its a wheatwine. like barleywine but lots of wheat. I used english yeast for it - WY1028 for those who care. It should end at about 9-10%ABV. The yeast was out of my last batch of IPA so I had tons of it.

    cheers.

  13. #138
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    Just brewed my first batch! Stoked....much much easier than I thought it'd be. Used a prepackaged recipe deal, mcmallin-something irish stout. stoked. and heavily buzzed. but mostly stoked.

  14. #139
    adam is offline The Shred Pirate Roberts
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    Brewed up a second batch last night. First is on the right.


    as you can see, my method became slightly more sophisticated.

  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam View Post
    Brewed up a second batch last night. First is on the right.


    as you can see, my method became slightly more sophisticated.

    What the hell are you fermenting in? you sure thats not your dogs urine samples?

    WOW...that doesnt look like its going to be good at all...no offense.
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  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam View Post
    Brewed up a second batch last night. First is on the right.


    as you can see, my method became slightly more sophisticated.
    You sir, need to get some carboys, ale pails, or better bottles. That looks like a recipe for disaster, not beer. Not too mention for a little more effort you will be drinking 5 gallons of beer, not 1 (or 3/4), if you get one of the things mentioned before..
    Last edited by BigJay; 11-05-2008 at 03:44 PM.
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  17. #142
    adam is offline The Shred Pirate Roberts
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    Haha, thought I might get that reaction. I don't know why home brewing has become such a sophisticated, delicate thing. Mead has been made for centuries and until the recently (as in the past 100 years) has it become something with fancy tools and techniques.

    Why should it taste bad? I've already tasted the one on the right, and in my humble opinion, it tastes good.

  18. #143
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    On a different note, do you guys make starters for most of your batches? I recently had a porter get stuck at 1.030 (not cool ) and don't want to have that happen again. I was thinking trying to get a 1000ml flask from work (ahem!) and using that. Does it have to be that big or could i just use a beer bottle (22 oz big enough?)?
    Just ski down there and jump of a somethin' fer cryin' out loud!

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  19. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam View Post
    Haha, thought I might get that reaction. I don't know why home brewing has become such a sophisticated, delicate thing. Mead has been made for centuries and until the recently (as in the past 100 years) has it become something with fancy tools and techniques.

    Why should it taste bad? I've already tasted the one on the right, and in my humble opinion, it tastes good.
    ahhh its meade...a little different, but still...nicer fermenters would be good!
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  20. #145
    adam is offline The Shred Pirate Roberts
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    The new batch is in a better container. First one was extremely half assed.

  21. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigJay View Post
    On a different note, do you guys make starters for most of your batches? I recently had a porter get stuck at 1.030 (not cool ) and don't want to have that happen again. I was thinking trying to get a 1000ml flask from work (ahem!) and using that. Does it have to be that big or could i just use a beer bottle (22 oz big enough?)?

    I always do starters.
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  22. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    I always do starters.
    How big?
    Just ski down there and jump of a somethin' fer cryin' out loud!

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  23. #148
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    Big Jay, you near Big Jay? You can make a mint brewing 5-gallon kegs for our ski house. We buy our kegs from Trout River now. May have to expand production a bit though....

    Campbell.... brakes on their way. Been busy as hell.
    Uno mas

  24. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doremite View Post
    Big Jay, you near Big Jay? You can make a mint brewing 5-gallon kegs for our ski house. We buy our kegs from Trout River now. May have to expand production a bit though....

    Campbell.... brakes on their way. Been busy as hell.
    Haha nope I get that question a lot. I'm in SLC right now, but if I end up in Northern VT next year we might have a deal!
    Just ski down there and jump of a somethin' fer cryin' out loud!

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  25. #150
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    bump

    just moved my 2nd batch into a secondary carboy. a nut brown ale with maple syrup, dropped the syrup into the wort for the last 5 minutes, taste test today was pretty good....stoked to see what it finishes like.

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