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  1. #101
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    Sweet thread!!!!! Just got into homebrewing. I goto Telluride bluegrass every year and camp with a bunch of homebrew nuts in town-park. Brewed a pretty sweet Pale Ale last year, Red this year, and about to start an IPA. Definitly going all glass after a fellow firefighter/brewer fucked up his last batch.

  2. #102
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    I just bottled my first batch yesterday using a kit one of my kids gave me as a present (the kit came with a plastic bucket.) Would someone be so kind as to summarize glass vs. plastic bucket for fermenting? Thanks in advance...WWC

  3. #103
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    Started a batch of cider on Saturday. As of this morning, haven't seen anything. Just a very thin layer of foam on the surface. Here's hoping it gets going sooner rather than later.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitewoodchuck View Post
    I just bottled my first batch yesterday using a kit one of my kids gave me as a present (the kit came with a plastic bucket.) Would someone be so kind as to summarize glass vs. plastic bucket for fermenting? Thanks in advance...WWC
    the only thing to explain is that plastic is much more suseptible to scratches that will harbor bacteria that you cannot sanitize out....

    glass...= really hard to scratch...plus its neato to watch the yeast work.

    Ditch the plastic if you are going to get serious about home brewing.

    PM me if you want some of my recipes (some award winning) or have any other brewing questions. I worked in a home brew store for many years and have been brewing for many as well.

    Good luck...its a fun hobby.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bean View Post
    Started a batch of cider on Saturday. As of this morning, haven't seen anything. Just a very thin layer of foam on the surface. Here's hoping it gets going sooner rather than later.
    Ouch....was it dry yeast or liquid?
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Ouch....was it dry yeast or liquid?
    Dry yeast, of a variety that was suggested in several places on the internets. Any suggestions on saving it if nothing happens in another day?

    edit: I just remembered that my last batch of beer (a stout that took 3-4 months of conditioning to get good...and mmmm was it ever) took a long time to get started too. Hmmm.
    Last edited by Bean; 10-27-2008 at 10:38 AM.

  7. #107
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    I just sampled my latest batch this past weekend in anticipation of this upcoming weekend - PASS.

    Carbonation is certainly not a problem with this batch! Popped the cap off the first bottle and two seconds later a beer volcano was erupting all over the kitchen. After clean up, I did a slow release opening on another bottle and all was fine. Next day, I broke out another bottle and forgot to slow release it. This time it looked like a slow overflow so I went to save it by trying to drink it as it came out and suddenly my head felt like it was exploding as the beer speed forced its way into my skull. Again, beer everywhere; countertops, windows, the ceiling, my face, hair, all over the fuggin' place. It was pretty funny. Dewey helped with the clean up.

    In any case, I think the deal with these bottles was the fact they contained the bottom of the carboy beer and there was lots of "sediment" at the bottom. I figure there was more food to feed the carbonation process and the other bottles will be less apt to volcano on me. Guess we'll see this weekend!!

    Quote Originally Posted by tradygirl View Post
    My latest batch is just starting to carbonate and I got to try it out this weekend - FAIL. Got a nice Chloroseptic off-flavor to it that's almost enough to make it undrinkable. The beer tasted great when I tried it while racking to secondary. I'm starting to get frustrated.

    How often do all of you change out your tubing, etc? Since our household has now had two skanky beers in the last year, I'm starting to think I have a chronic bacterial infection hiding out in my equipment somewhere. Any ideas on how to do a once-over on the buckets and tubing to kill everything? Or should we just start over and buy new stuff? I think ultimately I'd like to move to primary fermentation in glass.
    Fightin' to save the motherfucking day...

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bean View Post
    Dry yeast, of a variety that was suggested in several places on the internets. Any suggestions on saving it if nothing happens in another day?

    edit: I just remembered that my last batch of beer (a stout that took 3-4 months of conditioning to get good...and mmmm was it ever) took a long time to get started too. Hmmm.

    I would first suggest not using dry any more...move up and go with liquid..its slightly more of a pain but much more style specific....

    I dont know that there is anything you can really do to "kick start" it now...what you want is for your yeast to be VERY strong at time of pitching. This way it takes hole quicker and leave less room for nasties.

    At this point I say leave it be and what will be will be....
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by FartBag Commando View Post
    I figure there was more food to feed the carbonation process and the other bottles will be less apt to volcano on me. Guess we'll see this weekend!!
    note to self: do not open any of fartbag's beers this wknd .

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by FartBag Commando View Post
    I just sampled my latest batch this past weekend in anticipation of this upcoming weekend - PASS.

    Carbonation is certainly not a problem with this batch! Popped the cap off the first bottle and two seconds later a beer volcano was erupting all over the kitchen. After clean up, I did a slow release opening on another bottle and all was fine. Next day, I broke out another bottle and forgot to slow release it. This time it looked like a slow overflow so I went to save it by trying to drink it as it came out and suddenly my head felt like it was exploding as the beer speed forced its way into my skull. Again, beer everywhere; countertops, windows, the ceiling, my face, hair, all over the fuggin' place. It was pretty funny. Dewey helped with the clean up.

    In any case, I think the deal with these bottles was the fact they contained the bottom of the carboy beer and there was lots of "sediment" at the bottom. I figure there was more food to feed the carbonation process and the other bottles will be less apt to volcano on me. Guess we'll see this weekend!!
    Again this sounds like a classic case of contamination. The sediment has nothing to do with it...yeast eats sugar, the stuff at the bottom is just more yeast thats gone dormant. Unless you used WAY too much bottling sugar you have a bigger issue.

    I've had bottles literally explode due to contamination.

    keep us posted.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Again this sounds like a classic case of contamination. The sediment has nothing to do with it...yeast eats sugar, the stuff at the bottom is just more yeast thats gone dormant. Unless you used WAY too much bottling sugar you have a bigger issue.

    I've had bottles literally explode due to contamination.

    keep us posted.
    If there were off favors then maybe, otherwise it easily could have been too much priming sugar or perhaps the beer was warm or shaken up? I say if it tastes fine then it probably isn't from contamination.
    Just ski down there and jump of a somethin' fer cryin' out loud!

    -Pain McShlonkey

  12. #112
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    I don't think it's a contamination issue as the other two I opened without a problem were fine. I'm very happy with how it tastes, the color is nice and when poured properly makes a nice head. Guess we'll see.


    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Again this sounds like a classic case of contamination. The sediment has nothing to do with it...yeast eats sugar, the stuff at the bottom is just more yeast thats gone dormant. Unless you used WAY too much bottling sugar you have a bigger issue.

    I've had bottles literally explode due to contamination.

    keep us posted.
    Fightin' to save the motherfucking day...

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Um yeah its likely a small scratch inside one of the fermentation vessels. Id suggest moving to glass asap its much better and easier to sanitize.

    Question...how are you sanitizing? Iodaphor? oxi based?.....this sounds like either the secondary fermentation vessel or something in the bottling process. tubes rarely get scratches that will harbor bacteria so I doubt its that. How are you sanitizing the bottles?

    Let me know. I hope I can help.
    I sanitize buckets/tubes with iodaphor. I'm going to start using OxyClean for my pre-sanitizing cleanser from now on. That might help cut down on any organics that I'm missing.

    I sanitize bottles by running them through the dishwater with no soap. I figure the high temps kill pretty much everything. It's worked great on most batches.

    My buckets are still in really good shape - I haven't seen any visible scratches. However, they do have some remnant odor in them that makes me a little wary.
    It's like I died and went to heaven, but then it turned out it wasn't my time, and they sent me to a brewery.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by tradygirl View Post
    I sanitize buckets/tubes with iodaphor. I'm going to start using OxyClean for my pre-sanitizing cleanser from now on. That might help cut down on any organics that I'm missing.

    I sanitize bottles by running them through the dishwater with no soap. I figure the high temps kill pretty much everything. It's worked great on most batches.

    My buckets are still in really good shape - I haven't seen any visible scratches. However, they do have some remnant odor in them that makes me a little wary.
    Just for a note...i never bought the "dishwasher with no soap" method. id iodaphor it all....i know its a pain but its the only safe way to be sure you get all the nasties. I do suggest moving to a kegging system if at all possible.

    Again id dump the plastic and go glass....if at all possible.

    I dont think you need an oxy based cleanser the iodaphor is medical grade and should kill anything it comes in contact with. I swear by it over any oxy based sanitizers.

    Good luck...it gets easier with each batch!
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by FartBag Commando View Post
    I don't think it's a contamination issue as the other two I opened without a problem were fine. I'm very happy with how it tastes, the color is nice and when poured properly makes a nice head. Guess we'll see.
    If it tastes good then you're GTG.......probably just too much priming sugar...

    Enjoy..
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by tradygirl View Post
    I sanitize buckets/tubes with iodaphor. I'm going to start using OxyClean for my pre-sanitizing cleanser from now on. That might help cut down on any organics that I'm missing.

    I sanitize bottles by running them through the dishwater with no soap. I figure the high temps kill pretty much everything. It's worked great on most batches.

    My buckets are still in really good shape - I haven't seen any visible scratches. However, they do have some remnant odor in them that makes me a little wary.

    You might switch to StarSan. I have used it for years now without any trouble. It works in about 30 seconds. I have been told by the head of StarSan that he recommends switching sanitizers up from time to time as well to keep just incase you have a nasty that is resistant to Idaphore. The same would be the case if you used only StarSan.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by nopainnojane View Post
    You might switch to StarSan. I have used it for years now without any trouble. It works in about 30 seconds. I have been told by the head of StarSan that he recommends switching sanitizers up from time to time as well to keep just incase you have a nasty that is resistant to Idaphore. The same would be the case if you used only StarSan.

    Good suggestion right THAR.

    Trady...if you would like to borrow something to try out let me know. I have a TON of brew supplies. Outdoor cooker (boils 5 gal in like 15-20 min), wert chiller, etc. Shoot me a pm and I might be willing to lend out some stuff for a batch and to convert you to glass brewing.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  18. #118
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    Dec 2006
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    Salt Lake City
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    I've been brewing since april.
    I've been trying to get a batch going every week or so, but I fell behind for a while. Some batchs have been better than others. My favorite so far has been a Brooklyn Brown Ale recipe I got from the Beer nut.

    I sanitize using Five Star both before AND AFTER I use my brewing equipment and I think that's been key to getting decent beers without off flavors.

    Bottling is such a PITA, so I keg it. MUCH simpler.
    I have 2 cases of bottles that need a good home. So anybody that wants them Shoot me a PM and come get them.

    So far I have
    Smoke Porter -kegged in the kegerator.
    Honey Spruce Lager -Kegged in the kegerator
    Alaskan Amber Ale -Kegged (not in the kegerator)
    Mirror pond clone - In secondary
    Fat Tire Clone - In Secondary
    Brooklyn Brown - In primary.
    -James

    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo View Post
    It doesn't behave well until it's going mach retarded.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigerstripe40 View Post
    I've been brewing since april.
    I've been trying to get a batch going every week or so, but I fell behind for a while. Some batchs have been better than others. My favorite so far has been a Brooklyn Brown Ale recipe I got from the Beer nut.

    I sanitize using Five Star both before AND AFTER I use my brewing equipment and I think that's been key to getting decent beers without off flavors.

    Bottling is such a PITA, so I keg it. MUCH simpler.
    I have 2 cases of bottles that need a good home. So anybody that wants them Shoot me a PM and come get them.

    So far I have
    Smoke Porter -kegged in the kegerator.
    Honey Spruce Lager -Kegged in the kegerator
    Alaskan Amber Ale -Kegged (not in the kegerator)
    Mirror pond clone - In secondary
    Fat Tire Clone - In Secondary
    Brooklyn Brown - In primary.
    Can I come to your house?

    I have some bottles I might be willing to donate as well if someone is interested. I dont know the tally ill look tonight.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Can I come to your house?

    I have some bottles I might be willing to donate as well if someone is interested. I dont know the tally ill look tonight.
    Sure.
    I'm always willing to share my home brew.

    The Spuce Lager is kind of... Uhh... Off.. Very strong Spruce flavor. But Ihaven't tried it in over a week, so it might have mellowed out a little by now.
    -James

    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo View Post
    It doesn't behave well until it's going mach retarded.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Good suggestion right THAR.

    Trady...if you would like to borrow something to try out let me know. I have a TON of brew supplies. Outdoor cooker (boils 5 gal in like 15-20 min), wert chiller, etc. Shoot me a pm and I might be willing to lend out some stuff for a batch and to convert you to glass brewing.
    We've got the outdoor cooker, wort chiller, etc too. Just not a glass primary! Sounds like that's going to be the next step. I've been brewing for over two years now, so it's not a lack of practice - my beers seem just to be getting worse with experience.
    Maybe I'll hit you up for a fermenter some time. I've got a bunch of swill you could have for collatoral.

    I'm going to give it another shot post-Halloween when I don't have a deadline looming. I'd like to take more time to do it right...this batch was so rushed. I've always been a little concerned about the dishwasher method, but our beers have always turned out OK until recently. I guess it's time to go back to the tried-and-true bathtub method.

    Speaking of....anybody have a good cherry porter recipe? I hear it's all the rage these days.
    Last edited by tradygirl; 10-27-2008 at 03:59 PM.
    It's like I died and went to heaven, but then it turned out it wasn't my time, and they sent me to a brewery.

  22. #122
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    152
    Kegging is the way to go if you are brewing regularly/heavily and carbonation is more reliable.

    For fermentors, glass is easier to clean and not permiable to oxygen so you can leave beer in it for longer without oxidizing it. Glass also tend to have less sharp edges which nasties can collect in. I purposely age some beer in buckets for the oxidation (like my sours) which need oxygen for the funky bugs to work right.

    On tap (converted freezer with temp controller), I have:
    red ale 'hopped' with dried jasmine flowers
    barleywine
    quadIPA
    belgian strong golden
    american stout oaked aged
    sour bruin
    plus a half keg bubble water for my gal

    cheers petecz

  23. #123
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    Feb 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    I would first suggest not using dry any more...move up and go with liquid..its slightly more of a pain but much more style specific....

    I dont know that there is anything you can really do to "kick start" it now...what you want is for your yeast to be VERY strong at time of pitching. This way it takes hole quicker and leave less room for nasties.

    At this point I say leave it be and what will be will be....
    Well good news, got home and though the airlock wasn't bubbling, the yeast was definitely doing its thing. I fiddled with it and it's not bubbling yet but there's a pretty obvious pressure differential going on. Must've just had a leak plus a slow starting fermentation.

    I'll take a look into some liquid yeast when I figure out what I want to make next.

  24. #124
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    Dec 2007
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    NE
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    the only thing to explain is that plastic is much more suseptible to scratches that will harbor bacteria that you cannot sanitize out....

    glass...= really hard to scratch...plus its neato to watch the yeast work.

    Ditch the plastic if you are going to get serious about home brewing.

    PM me if you want some of my recipes (some award winning) or have any other brewing questions. I worked in a home brew store for many years and have been brewing for many as well.

    Good luck...its a fun hobby.
    Thanks for the informative reply, I appreciate it!

  25. #125
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    Dec 2006
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    Salt Lake City
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    of the different batch's I have done, I have not noticed an appreciable differnce between liquid yeast and dry yeast.

    looking through my notes, my best batches of home brew were made with the SafeAle Pink packet dry yeast. I made a starter with 1 cup of water, with 1/2 cup of dry malt extract disolved in it. The yeast was placed in this when the temp got down to 70 degrees or so and I allowed it to proof during my wort boil.

    I have not noticed an appreciable difference in beers when using PacMan, or White labs liquid yeasts. Wyeast has made some differences, but worth the cost?
    Not really.
    -James

    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo View Post
    It doesn't behave well until it's going mach retarded.

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