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  1. #1
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    Bunion (your results may vary)

    I first noticed a problem in 2002 with my old Technica Explosions. The buckle rivet on the right foot, little toe side was digging into my metatarsal joint. I replaced the Explosions with Icons in fall 2003. After a dozen ski days, I had pain on the left foot little toe metatarsal joint. I didn’t pay it much mind until spring of 2004. I went to a podiatrist for a look see and was told I had a Taylor’s Bunion. (regular bunion is on the big toe) My option was surgery or wear loose fitting shoes to prevent aggravation. That summer the pain & swelling forced me to cut back on running and cycling. In the fall I had my boots blown out on both feet at the metatarsal joint. That helped ease the pain to get me through the ski season. By spring 2005, my left foot was irritated in any shoe I wore. It was time to go under the knife.

    Bunions are generally created when the toes get forced into a confined shoe. They crunch together causing the metatarsal bone to curve in the opposite direction driving the joint away from the rest of the foot. In my case, I have skinny feet and my arch collapses causing the metatarsal joints to spread out from each other. In a confined ski boot, they have no where to move. Orthotics help, but don’t eliminate the problem. After many years something had to give. For me it was the 5th metatarsal.

    Aug 11, 2005 was my surgery. The procedure consisted of removing the inflamed bursa sacks around the joint, shaving off a bone spur, cutting the metatarsal and setting it straight with pins. Although I was unconscious during the procedure, I swear I could hear the Dremel drill slicing the bone in my dream state. I was non-weight bearing for three weeks. Then I was in an air cast for three weeks. The next two weeks I weaned out of the cast into a shoe. Surprisingly, I had little swelling after the surgery and no pain. Discomfort didn’t come until I started walking out of the cast. My foot muscles were tight & sore from lack of use, plus the bone & joint were tender.

    Today, 9 weeks after the surgery, I can walk a mile without limping although there is some soreness at the joint. The doc took final xrays and said all is good. He released me for “light” jogging and “light” skiing. Tonight I will see how happy my foot is in the ski boot. I may need further adjustments before getting on the slope. But it’s getting close.

    If anyone has questions, I'll be happy to help as I can.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Vancouver
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    222
    Yeah I've heard about the surgery for bunions... I have it pretty bad on my right foot big toe... but the little ones hurt in my ski boots sometimes. I guess it's sorta what I get for having shitty feet and wearing skate shoes since grade 6. I found in the summer the big toe one was killing me, but it seems to have dissipated since I've been back to school. I fear I'm gonna have to get the surgery, but I don't when I have the time to put myself out for so long. Realistically, how long does it put you out for before you can do anything? like work, travel, etc...??
    The skills of evaluating evidence, posing questions and answering them, of writing, of mobilizing information in order to make an argument. I think all of that is important in a democratic society if people are actually going to be active citizens - Eric Foner

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Down the valley a bit further on the good side of the 49th
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    FOOTBEDS. The bunions generally develop though a combination of pressure AND movement. The movement usually comes from over or dysfunctional pronation. The foot bed helps to or totally controls this movement. No pressure= good. No pressure +no movement = much better. For down the road so you don't get a recurrence is what I'm thinking.
    It's not so much the model year, it's the high mileage or meterage to keep the youth of Canada happy

  4. #4
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    Rocks, length of recovery can vary. For me it was 10 weeks before I felt I could go for a hike and I figured 12 weeks before I could ski & run.

    Except.....

    Dumbshit alert!

    Last week I kicked the edge of the closet door in the dark with my bare bad foot. I slammed it so hard, my foot swelled like a balloon and I couldn't walk on it for a couple days. I had conflicting opinions of the xrays taken at the ER. My surgeon compared them to xrays from 2 weeks prior and said the bone looks intact. All I know is I have an ache in the surgical bone that I didn't have before.

    Damn, that was stuuupid. I was looking forward to hitting the slopes this weekend. I figure I've lost a minimum of 2 weeks recovery.


    As for orthotics / custom footbeds, I went down that road, but didn't really help for the high cost. I'll make sure I wear more supportive shoes than my ultra comfy 10 year old Docksiders.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    spitting distance from Mavericks
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    I had surgery years ago on both feet, one year apart. The biggest piece of advice I can give from my experience:

    Do not let them do a bunionectomy, but rather an osteotomy. I had a bunionectomy on my right foot, where they basically remove the bunion, and sure enough, it's back.

    I had an osteotomy - where they shorten the bone in your foot leading to your big toe - on my left foot and it's a dream. Though I can often feel pain where the screw is in my foot, it's pretty much a non-issue.

    Sadly, I'll probably have to have surgery again on my right foot.

    My two cents.
    “Within this furnace of fear, my passion for life burns fiercely. I have consumed all evil. I have overcome my doubt. I am the fire.”

  6. #6
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    Today was the first day on skis, 3 months after the surgery. All is well with the foot. No pain or discomfort, other than some minor swelling. Standing around for 1.5 hours waiting for the Copper maint crew to get the lift running didn't cause any problems either. Having my boot punchout definitely helped. Now I have to get my legs & lungs in shape.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Breckenfridge
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    I am begging anyone with foot/bunion type problems to PLEASE do a lot of research on your doctor before you commit to having foot surgery. There is a HUGE difference between a podiatrist and an orthopaedic surgeon with a foot/ankle speciality. I work for an orthopedic surgeon that did a fellowship in foot/ankle and he sees tons of people that initially went to a podiatrist who screwed their foot up royally!!
    Go big, or go home!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Mine was 2 years ago and its back. Skiing is about the only think that makes it feel better. Too bad we live in Gomer Central Indiana.

    I agree - get LOTS of second opinions.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2003
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    das heights
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    little off topic- but i learned that bonespurs can be cured with a rubber mallett

    add that to yer knowledge bank

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pointedem
    little off topic- but i learned that bonespurs can be cured with a rubber mallett

    add that to yer knowledge bank
    That's funny. My wife's massage lady told me to take a belt sander to my bone spur.

    fuck that.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    4,115
    Quote Originally Posted by Rossichick
    I am begging anyone with foot/bunion type problems to PLEASE do a lot of research on your doctor before you commit to having foot surgery. There is a HUGE difference between a podiatrist and an orthopaedic surgeon with a foot/ankle speciality. I work for an orthopedic surgeon that did a fellowship in foot/ankle and he sees tons of people that initially went to a podiatrist who screwed their foot up royally!!
    This is so true, i would only goto an orthopedic foot specialist. Podiatrists can do lots of damage

  12. #12
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    Some podiatrists can be morons. Some orthopeds can be morons. I found both. If a podiatrist is a board certified surgeon, one could expect the skill level to be on par with an orthoped. I wouldn't let any knucklehead cut my foot.

  13. #13
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    Ok, So I have my "bunionette/taylor bunion" removal surgery scheduled for April 4th. Now I am scared. I am seeing a podiatrist who is a board certified surgeon as well...How do I find out if this guy is a hack or not???

    Any more advice anyone can give?? Now I am getting really nervous!

    HELP!!
    ‎"Powder snow skiing is not fun. It's life, fully lived, life lived in a blaze of reality." -Dolores LaChapelle

  14. #14
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    Jan 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by bumpskier
    Ok, So I have my "bunionette/taylor bunion" removal surgery scheduled for April 4th. Now I am scared. I am seeing a podiatrist who is a board certified surgeon as well...How do I find out if this guy is a hack or not???

    Any more advice anyone can give?? Now I am getting really nervous!

    HELP!!
    I would only see a orthopedic foot specialist. You are risking a major problem seeing a podiatrist.
    This guy could hobble you for months.
    Ortho Foot Specialists are hard to find, but worthe search!

  15. #15
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    So, I my insurance will cover a specialist. Anyone in Southern VT (rutland county) used a Dr. for this same reason? I need more info. I don't know where to begin to find out if my Dr. is good or not. Accorind to the Association of State Medical Board Executive Directors he is vertified & has no complaints. But still, I am an athelete and I don't want to get screwed, as he is only a podiatrist.

    Elkhound, did you go to Podiatrist or Ortho Specialist?

    "Do not let them do a bunionectomy, but rather an osteotomy. I had a bunionectomy on my right foot, where they basically remove the bunion, and sure enough, it's back."

    Does this apply to bunionette's??
    ‎"Powder snow skiing is not fun. It's life, fully lived, life lived in a blaze of reality." -Dolores LaChapelle

  16. #16
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    I found bunionectomy and osteotomy are used interchangeably. The surgery consists of cutting and restting the bone. I supposed there is a procedure in which the protuding bone/inflamation is shaved off, but I don't know that name. Don't get that done, it's not permanent.

    I went to a board certified surgical podiatrist. I consulted with 3 different podiatrist before selecting one. I also insisted that he give me a refence to speak to before the surgery, which he did.

    My podiatrist was very receptive of my need to resume an athletic lifestyle. He is a hockey player himself. In comparison, one of the other pods wonder why I would ever want to hike up a mountain. (Um, dude, you live in Colorado, what kind of dumb statement is that?)

    My surgery went fine w/o complications. Very little pain afterward. I've been able to ski pain free all season. I just started trail running again and have not had any probelms. The only complaint I have is that the screws are a bit too long and I can feel them in the bottom of my foot (5th metatarsil). It is not painful, just a reminder that it exists. Depending on how serious I get with running this spring, I may have to have them removed.

    Many people lump podiatrists in with chiropractors. They don't consider them "real" doctors (especially surgeons). If you feel comfortable with your doc and have some reference of the quality of his/her work, then I'm sure you'll be OK.

    Good luck!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    3,452
    Quote Originally Posted by bumpskier
    Ok, So I have my "bunionette/taylor bunion" removal surgery scheduled for April 4th. Now I am scared. I am seeing a podiatrist who is a board certified surgeon as well...How do I find out if this guy is a hack or not???

    Any more advice anyone can give?? Now I am getting really nervous!

    HELP!!
    Did they tell you how long the recovery for this would be?

    My mom just had bunionette surgery on Tuesday... and will be off her foot for two weeks, then limited walking for another two weeks- she can't even drive during this time.

    All in all, it seemed like a very harrowing experience for her... a lot of time to commit to bed rest, for a very minor (such a small) thing! I couldn't believe what a major process it was just for this little thing.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    188
    When I was 17 I had surgery for a bunion and arch pain on my left foot. My parents found an orthopaedic
    surgeon who specialized in feet. Did a lot of work on children with club feet to be exact.
    I had a pretty radical surgery and pretty much experimental if you ask me, I only say this since
    I've never heard of anyone else having this done.

    Dr. K explained to me that the bunion was caused by overpronation in my left foot. I had been running
    since I was 12 years old and the running didn't help matters. I had a fallen arch along with the bunion.
    Dr. K recommended some pretty radical surgery to alleviate this.

    What Dr. K did was lift my arch and add a metal plate, he cut the heal and moved it inward
    just a bit to keep me from pronating, he also cut my toe but to this day I don't know what he
    did I just recall having a pin in my toe. I was in a cast for about 3 months.
    I had a second surgery to remove all of the hardware and I was in a cast for 6 weeks after the
    second surgery. I've been pain free ever since. Mind you I have two very different feet.
    Now instead of pronating I supinate which leads to ankle sprains. Wearing heels over 3 inches
    is totally out of the question, but hey I can ski and run without pain. I've developed a bit of
    a hammertoe unfortunately and I feel it's due to the arch having been lifted. Overall I am very
    happy with the results and I would do it again.

    To keep my right foot from developing a bunion I wear orthotics when I exercise.

  19. #19
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    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacomaLuv
    Did they tell you how long the recovery for this would be?

    My mom just had bunionette surgery on Tuesday... and will be off her foot for two weeks, then limited walking for another two weeks- she can't even drive during this time.

    All in all, it seemed like a very harrowing experience for her... a lot of time to commit to bed rest, for a very minor (such a small) thing! I couldn't believe what a major process it was just for this little thing.
    They said recovery is 4-6 weeks...Eight if they have to cut through a tendon. I am actually headed this morning for my x-rays. I believe the x-rays will give me/Dr. a better idea of exactly what the surgery will entail.

    I am getting the surgery on the outside of my foot, not the big toe where bunions normally form...it has to be from 20 years of tight ski boots???

    I thank you all for your concern and advice!
    Feelin' the maggot love (even for a JONG like myself)!
    ‎"Powder snow skiing is not fun. It's life, fully lived, life lived in a blaze of reality." -Dolores LaChapelle

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    188
    I woudl think any type of foot surgery is a "big" thing.

    Make sure your fitted for orthotics to use when you run. It makes a big difference. Good luck.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Elkhound Odin
    I first noticed a problem in 2002 with my old Technica Explosions. The buckle rivet on the right foot, little toe side was digging into my metatarsal joint. I replaced the Explosions with Icons in fall 2003. After a dozen ski days, I had pain on the left foot little toe metatarsal joint. I didn’t pay it much mind until spring of 2004. I went to a podiatrist for a look see and was told I had a Taylor’s Bunion. (regular bunion is on the big toe) My option was surgery or wear loose fitting shoes to prevent aggravation. That summer the pain & swelling forced me to cut back on running and cycling. In the fall I had my boots blown out on both feet at the metatarsal joint. That helped ease the pain to get me through the ski season. By spring 2005, my left foot was irritated in any shoe I wore. It was time to go under the knife.

    Bunions are generally created when the toes get forced into a confined shoe. They crunch together causing the metatarsal bone to curve in the opposite direction driving the joint away from the rest of the foot. In my case, I have skinny feet and my arch collapses causing the metatarsal joints to spread out from each other. In a confined ski boot, they have no where to move. Orthotics help, but don’t eliminate the problem. After many years something had to give. For me it was the 5th metatarsal.

    Aug 11, 2005 was my surgery. The procedure consisted of removing the inflamed bursa sacks around the joint, shaving off a bone spur, cutting the metatarsal and setting it straight with pins. Although I was unconscious during the procedure, I swear I could hear the Dremel drill slicing the bone in my dream state. I was non-weight bearing for three weeks. Then I was in an air cast for three weeks. The next two weeks I weaned out of the cast into a shoe. Surprisingly, I had little swelling after the surgery and no pain. Discomfort didn’t come until I started walking out of the cast. My foot muscles were tight & sore from lack of use, plus the bone & joint were tender.

    Today, 9 weeks after the surgery, I can walk a mile without limping although there is some soreness at the joint. The doc took final xrays and said all is good. He released me for “light” jogging and “light” skiing. Tonight I will see how happy my foot is in the ski boot. I may need further adjustments before getting on the slope. But it’s getting close.

    If anyone has questions, I'll be happy to help as I can.
    I'm considering bunionette + neuroma surgery on same foot. Not a skier, not an athlete, just want to walk without pain. Might be a dumb question, but does "non weight bearing" mean totally horizontal for 3 weeks. Then air cast = on crutches ?

  22. #22
    Join Date
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    Non weight bearing means crutches. ie don't put your foot on the ground and stand on it. During the crutch phase, my foot was wrapped in a ace bandage. I spent a week transitioning from crutches to walking when the air cast went on then a few weeks hobbling around in the cast.

    Your doc will set your expectations for your specific surgery. Good Luck!

    edit: Google search must be pretty good for you to find this obscure post.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Switzerland
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    bump coz i gots a bunion.

    ouch.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    781
    Bumping this..recently went to the dr and I haz teh tailor's bunion. It's not too bad on a daily basis but definitely a little sore after mtn biking and trail running/hiking. I went skiing once this year and I thought the outside of my foot was gonna fall off though with the force from my old shitty ski boots, which prompted my visit to the foot dr. and not ski again this winter.

    Anyways, I ended up getting a custom footbed from the pediatrist to stabilize the metatarsal and he basically said if it gets really painful I can come in for a shot. I don't want this to progress into something way worse over the years so I'm open to suggestions for what else I can do on a day to day basis? I came across these online: https://www.correcttoes.com/ and was wondering if anyone has tried them? They seem like really expensive pieces of plastic but the general concept (coupled with wider toe box shoes) might alleviate some of the pressure and help my toe alignment?

    Also, I have naturally wide feet and high arches and am open to advice on wider toe box shoes as well. Currently looking to replace my sneakers with better ones that are better accommodating. There seem to be a new crop of wide toe, low drop minimal shoes out there (i.e. Vivo, Lems, Altra shoes, etc) but again seem kinda spendy $100+ for minimal shoes. Plus they all look like manbun, yogi chakkra shoes... any advice for more normal looking wider sneakers?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Groomer Gambler View Post
    Also, I have naturally wide feet and high arches and am open to advice on wider toe box shoes as well. Currently looking to replace my sneakers with better ones that are better accommodating. There seem to be a new crop of wide toe, low drop minimal shoes out there (i.e. Vivo, Lems, Altra shoes, etc) but again seem kinda spendy $100+ for minimal shoes. Plus they all look like manbun, yogi chakkra shoes... any advice for more normal looking wider sneakers?
    Xero Shoes makes some pretty normal-looking stuff and they're mostly under $100. I have the Hana and like them.

    https://xeroshoes.com/shop/product-category/shoes/

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