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  1. #1
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    A video they should play at every level one class

    https://www.instagram.com/p/C5E8_mtvAsF/

    Jesus, I cried a bit when her husband hugged her. I don't think many skiers think about the reailty of consequences and then a rescue, based on the bat-shit lines skied around the wasatch day after day in questionable conditions. This might, maybe, makes you think about what happens if you fuck up. I had someone die in my arms and I had nightmares every single night for at least a year, and lots more after it tapered off - it's fucking intense whether you live or die.

  2. #2
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    Looks like a slip and slide to me. If you want to get freaked, watch some full burials.
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  3. #3
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    Also watch To The Hills and Back, it has its own thread. It expounds on the loss and what happens after.


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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    https://www.instagram.com/p/C5E8_mtvAsF/

    Jesus, I cried a bit when her husband hugged her. I don't think many skiers think about the reailty of consequences and then a rescue, based on the bat-shit lines skied around the wasatch day after day in questionable conditions. This might, maybe, makes you think about what happens if you fuck up. I had someone die in my arms and I had nightmares every single night for at least a year, and lots more after it tapered off - it's fucking intense whether you live or die.
    Unsure if this will come across as judgemental or callous... not the intent.

    The partiality buried skiier's immediate emotional response is close to complete meltdown. I've been involved in numerous near death experiences kayaking and have never seen a boater meltdown like this. I wonder if the difference is because the backcountry skiing experience feels so innocuous until it isn't, whereas the whitewater kayaking experience always has at least a hint of danger peppered with at least occasional beatdowns.

    It is almost as if the backcountry skier has never seriously and deeply considered the real possibility of adverse events.

    I would bet this causes people to take chances like dropping into a leeward slope that is wind loading in front of their very eyes without even thinking twice.

    I'm not sure my writing will make sense here. I'm glad the skier survived.

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  5. #5
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    Interesting video. A small slope and a small slide that clearly demonstrates how much smaller the human is and that the mountain has the final say.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  6. #6
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    I don't know if I'd call that "close to a complete meltdown." Sounds like a flood of adrenaline receding and emotions taking over, relief in particular. Reading her caption is worthwhile. I do agree bc skiing can seem pretty innocuous until it isn't, unlike climbing/kayaking etc.

  7. #7
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    I’d call that a meltdown. I wouldn’t want to be in any situation where there’s a possibility of danger with that person.


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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeahman View Post
    I don't know if I'd call that "close to a complete meltdown." Sounds like a flood of adrenaline receding and emotions taking over, relief in particular. Reading her caption is worthwhile. I do agree bc skiing can seem pretty innocuous until it isn't, unlike climbing/kayaking etc.
    Close to a meltdown or not is not my point.

    My point is the skiers statement, "I can't believe this is how I die," may be telling of how a lot of backcountry enthusiasts approach risk in skiing. As former whitewater kayaker, most of the people I knew that boated realized, or believed, kayaking had the highest chance of killing them compared to their daily lives... well, maybe except for the ones that base jumped (I don't think I knew them, though .)

    One of my regrets about boating is taking risks upon myself that could affect my immediate family and friends. I was young and single then. I'm older, with a wife and family, and much less centered on myself.

    Shit, a friend of mine, exceedingly strong skiier, hit a tree while ripping under a lift skiing inbounds and died. I bet a lot of people skiing inbounds don't have that level of risk consideration in the forefront of their minds. I digress.

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  9. #9
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    I’ve had new partners in the bc ask me “is this safe?”. I always tell them that safe is a relative term. People want to ski tour, take a level 1 and really have no appreciation for the risks inherent in ski touring. It’s not just avalanches, any injury can turn into an ordeal.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    I’ve had new partners in the bc ask me “is this safe?”. I always tell them that safe is a relative term. People want to ski tour, take a level 1 and really have no appreciation for the risks inherent in ski touring. It’s not just avalanches, any injury can turn into an ordeal.


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    Yup. A simple bad choice or mistake can escalate into a monumental shit storm real quickly. A lot of folks don't really understand this.
    dirtbag, not a dentist

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Also watch To The Hills and Back, it has its own thread. It expounds on the loss and what happens after.


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    I should/will. Glad to hear something like that exists - I now remember a friend mentioning how powerful it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by skinipenem View Post
    Unsure if this will come across as judgemental or callous... not the intent.

    The partiality buried skiier's immediate emotional response is close to complete meltdown. I've been involved in numerous near death experiences kayaking and have never seen a boater meltdown like this. I wonder if the difference is because the backcountry skiing experience feels so innocuous until it isn't, whereas the whitewater kayaking experience always has at least a hint of danger peppered with at least occasional beatdowns.

    It is almost as if the backcountry skier has never seriously and deeply considered the real possibility of adverse events.

    I would bet this causes people to take chances like dropping into a leeward slope that is wind loading in front of their very eyes without even thinking twice.

    I'm not sure my writing will make sense here. I'm glad the skier survived.

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    Males are trained by society to hide emotions then get PTSD from it, that doesn't work out either. I don't call that a meltdown, that's releasing stress when no one needs to be found, the situation is over. And that was what, 10-15 seconds of a rescue that lasted 3? 5? hours? We didn't see the rest of her rescue and really why are we judging her here? Why? I think based on her comments she broke her butt btw, a tough injury, and I think she was composed and cracking jokes down to the ambulance on a tough rescue, and no woman needs permission from men on the internet to be real with their emotions after a near death experience. I'm getting some toxic male vibes man.

  12. #12
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    One of the most levelheaded people I know when the shit hits the fan is a woman. Get out of here with the toxic masculinity bs.

    In emergency situations being able to compartmentalize as a victim or responder is invaluable.


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  13. #13
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    You guys realize she had just gotten carried through and over cliffs and was seriously injured right? Stop judging her from the first ten seconds after that. Any medical or rescue training I've done covers the fact you may have to calm the victim down, keep them from moving around, or being hostile. I've seen some collected, tough people freaking out right after a traumatic injury. Once settled down, they were model patients over long extractions.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by claymond View Post
    You guys realize she had just gotten carried through and over cliffs and was seriously injured right? Stop judging her from the first ten seconds after that. Any medical or rescue training I've done covers the fact you may have to calm the victim down, keep them from moving around, or being hostile. I've seen some collected, tough people freaking out right after a traumatic injury. Once settled down, they were model patients over long extractions.
    ^ This.

    Edit: however, I wasn’t impressed with the person that videoed it. I thought: “Less talking, more assessment.”

  15. #15
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    Put down the phone and help?


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  16. #16
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    My point is getting lost. When people watch this and only see the actions of the victim, rescuer, and the snow conditions that lead to this avie instead of hearing the higher level lessons of - 'this may teach newbs the emotional wringer you could go through without showing a dead person blue in the snow being dug out, or without anyone even getting buried.'

    This video isn't as valuable as I thought anymore. If people watch this through their ego thinking "I'd never be in the situation to begin with" or "I would never react like that" I guess I'm naive thinking this HAS to be in avie classes.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Put down the phone and help?


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    She was filming with a GoPro, not a phone. Looked like a helmet mount.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    My point is getting lost. When people watch this and only see the actions of the victim, rescuer, and the snow conditions that lead to this avie instead of hearing the higher level lessons of - 'this may teach newbs the emotional wringer you could go through without showing a dead person blue in the snow being dug out, or without anyone even getting buried.'

    This video isn't as valuable as I thought anymore. If people watch this through their ego thinking "I'd never be in the situation to begin with" or "I would never react like that" I guess I'm naive thinking this HAS to be in avie classes.
    I think the value of the video isn’t the reaction of the victim. The value is that on a beautiful day on a slope that many might consider benign bad shit can happen. People often underestimate the objective hazard when ski touring. We’re all going to react differently. I think that focusing on the victim’s reaction instead of the decision making that lead to a bad outcome is trite.

    Of course that’s just my opinion and you can feel free to say it’s toxic masculinity. I’m not going to say I’d never make a bad decision either, I have and welcomed the criticism after nearly killing myself.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    I should/will. Glad to hear something like that exists - I now remember a friend mentioning how powerful it is.



    Males are trained by society to hide emotions then get PTSD from it, that doesn't work out either. I don't call that a meltdown, that's releasing stress when no one needs to be found, the situation is over. And that was what, 10-15 seconds of a rescue that lasted 3? 5? hours? We didn't see the rest of her rescue and really why are we judging her here? Why? I think based on her comments she broke her butt btw, a tough injury, and I think she was composed and cracking jokes down to the ambulance on a tough rescue, and no woman needs permission from men on the internet to be real with their emotions after a near death experience. I'm getting some toxic male vibes man.
    You're really reading into my post stating something far from my intent. Feel free to reread the first line a few times. Read the qualifying words like "almost," "seems," etc... obviously, the video is only a brief snapshot into the days events.

    Male/ female doesn't matter to me in the situation. Just like MU above, I've had kayaking partners that were women and more composed than any man. I'm not sure where you get toxic masculinity from.

    I do think my commenting on dropping into a leeward slope with wind loading right before one's eyes was a bit harsh/blunt. I'll leave that comment in my post above and stand by my error. The point is that anyone can make that mistake, and mistakes are made more often when risks/ consequences are not at the forefront of one's mind. Whether risks were at the forefront of that skiers mind doesn't matter to me and is irrelevant to my point.


    I'll echo the posts above that recommend, To the Hills and Back. The movie hits a home run.

    I am beyond relieved that the skier survived.

    Either way, I'm checking out of this thread.

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinipenem View Post
    You're really reading into my post stating something far from my intent. Feel free to reread the first line a few times. Read the qualifying words like "almost," "seems," etc... obviously, the video is only a brief snapshot into the days events.

    Male/ female doesn't matter to me in the situation. Just like MU above, I've had kayaking partners that were women and more composed than any man. I'm not sure where you get toxic masculinity from.

    I do think my commenting on dropping into a leeward slope with wind loading right before one's eyes was a bit harsh/blunt. I'll leave that comment in my post above and stand by my error. The point is that anyone can make that mistake, and mistakes are made more often when risks/ consequences are not at the forefront of one's mind. Whether risks were at the forefront of that skiers mind doesn't matter to me and is irrelevant to my point.


    I'll echo the posts above that recommend, To the Hills and Back. The movie hits a home run.

    I am beyond relieved that the skier survived.

    Either way, I'm checking out of this thread.

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    That's fine, this thread isn't going anywhere and as I said, I don't think the video is valuable to everyone as I first thought. It's rare for a avie video to show raw emotions instead they are held back, or the person is in shock and can't express shit, or it's simply cut out of the edit so they don't have to engage with unnecessary judgement with people like you. Otherwise, to me, it's one of hundreds of videos online of someone getting caught in a slide and unremarkable from a snow safety learning standpoint.

    Your meltdown comment is still bullshit but it is fascinating to me to learn what people get out of this video.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    That's fine, this thread isn't going anywhere and as I said, I don't think the video is valuable to everyone as I first thought. It's rare for a avie video to show raw emotions instead they are held back, or the person is in shock and can't express shit, or it's simply cut out of the edit so they don't have to engage with unnecessary judgement with people like you. Otherwise, to me, it's one of hundreds of videos online of someone getting caught in a slide and unremarkable from a snow safety learning standpoint.

    Your meltdown comment is still bullshit but it is fascinating to me to learn what people get out of this video.
    Who is judging now? Get over yourself


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  22. #22
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    Did she break her leg? I see that she was brought out on a a make shift toboggan.

    Shock and fear hits everyone differently. No judgement on my end. She thought she was dead for a minute there. I've been there maybe two or three times and it definitely fucked me up.
    dirtbag, not a dentist

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisingarizona13 View Post
    Did she break her leg? I see that she was brought out on a a make shift toboggan.

    Shock and fear hits everyone differently. No judgement on my end. She thought she was dead for a minute there. I've been there maybe two or three times and it definitely fucked me up.
    I'm having trouble figuring it all out from IG but I think she broke her butt, but it could have been a leg instead.

    What's annoying to me is this judging of her being real in the moment, 10 seconds into a 3-5 hour rescue. No one knows anything but those 10 seconds - a blip in time. And either way, anyone I rescue can cry, puke, stay silent, scream, be rational or irrational - whatever! and I won't hold it against them or whisper it to anyone afterwards. As Mike Tyson says - loosely - we all have a plan (and think we know how we will react) until we get punched in the face. Two of my friends asked if they were going to die after accidents - were they bad victims having mental breakdowns and not focusing on the rescue to anyone here reading this?

  24. #24
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    A video they should play at every level one class

    I think you’re taking this a bit personally. Why do you care if we don’t agree with you about the relevance of this video? Do you think you’re the only person that has been in a situation like this and anyone with an opinion counter to yours is just judging and exuding toxic masculinity? I’m genuinely curious why you are reacting this way.


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  25. #25
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    I think he's "triggered".

    Someone had to.
    Is it radix panax notoginseng? - splat
    This is like hanging yourself but the rope breaks. - DTM
    Dude Listen to mtm. He's a marriage counselor at burning man. - subtle plague

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