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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Shuswap Highlands
    Posts
    4,368

    A video they should play at every level one class

    From an avy teaching perspective who cares how one person reacts after the shit hits the fan. Not the purpose of the exercise. What conditions were evaluated prior to the subject dropping in, and what was the result. Is there empirical learnings there. Those are the classroom discussions that have merit.

    The above conversations reminds me of the stupid shock vids back in highschool about drunk driving and it’s possible/probable outcomes. The effects after the fact displayed in the movies were rarely useful from a decision-making process IMO. At least for most of the viewers, and my observations of their actions at the next bonfire social they attended. Shock effects everyone differently (whether from an actual event or just as an observer).

    Should you have a reasonable understanding of your comrades heading out in a backcountry adventure? You bet. Would I ski with the subject in the video? Dunno by the one (edited?) snapshot. And stress/shock response is also not the same in every instance - what was in a person’s head the day before. What had been building? Remember we are all humans, not some MCU character on the TV, no matter how we present ourselves in our best light.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    21,323
    Watched without audio. So can’t comment on the freak out.
    But my initial reaction was the snowboarder video insta snap gram preserving the moment while the skier comes in from left to initiate the rescue.

    Yes. Perhaps the video could help locate the burial. But if you have beacons get out on that bed surface and get on the scene.
    I’ve just decided to be a middle aged somewhat depressed somewhat anxious fucktard until the end.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Posts
    2,968
    Quote Originally Posted by BCMtnHound View Post
    The above conversations reminds me of the stupid shock vids back in highschool about drunk driving and it’s possible/probable outcomes. The effects after the fact displayed in the movies were rarely useful from a decision-making process IMO. At least for most of the viewers, and my observations of their actions at the next bonfire social they attended. Shock effects everyone differently (whether from an actual event or just as an observer).
    I would think this video would wake people up on the realities of accidents - it's not quite a shock video because no one dies - but I'll humbly admit I'm naive believing this after seeing people's responses here. I don't think it's a valuable learning video anymore. It certainly would be valuable for a few types of people, but not for everyone like I thought.

    I watched into the hills last night, great reference thanks ZZZ, it gets the same point/message across but the message is framed much better than the video I posted.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fairhaven
    Posts
    260
    As someone who recently pulled a cyanotic person out of a tree well I can easily say that I was not prepared for the trauma of CPR. I knew what I needed to know to coordinate the process of CPR and even to check to make sure it was done with good quality but I left with a sense of being unprepared. I'm not sure how I will roll this into future avalanche classes yet but there is some value in the "shock videos" for first responders. There is also value in sharing the realities of the consequences of the mountains since our environment often lacks feedback until it's too late. The counter argument is that witnessing traumatic events can cause trauma as well. There is a careful line to follow to prepare the right people without injuring the wrong people.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    23,395
    Quote Originally Posted by claymond View Post
    You guys realize she had just gotten carried through and over cliffs and was seriously injured right? Stop judging her from the first ten seconds after that. Any medical or rescue training I've done covers the fact you may have to calm the victim down, keep them from moving around, or being hostile. I've seen some collected, tough people freaking out right after a traumatic injury. Once settled down, they were model patients over long extractions.
    I dislocated my shoulder in a tough spot. I apologized to the patroler who got to me. He said, " Hey, you're not bleeding and you're not screaming, so no problem."

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