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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    So I ended up doing four of those steeps camps back then, (and then the one in LaGrave). Mrs. Plug did 2, the first one a year after I did it, and she had a blast, because she was so used to chasing me and my buddies around. (It was fun to ski with gals.). Of course she was skiing with Emily Coombs, Eva Twardokens, and the women patrollers and instructors from Jackson, which didn’t suck.
    Fkna awesome plugs. I’m jealous.

  2. #52
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    Sep 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    I'm of the opinion that to be an expert skier you have to start as a kid. I'm sure there are exceptions, and there's no reason you can't start as an adult and have a lot of fun and love the sport, but I think there will always be something missing. (I did learn as a kid, but it didn't help.)
    As someone that really didnít start downhill skiing until my mid- 20ís I fully agree with this. I would have loved to start as a kid but no money or parental interest meant it was never in the cards. I did have an old xc setup and the golf course was only a couple of blocks away. I joined the xc ski team so I could use their equipment and get a bus ride to actual xc ski areas.

    Starting in my 20ís I started skiing Smuggs with friends that had been skiing since they were toddlers. The whole ďski with people better than youĒ may work if youíve got a decent foundation but it wasnít pretty following those skiers through the back bowls and side country. I learned survival skiing, I can get through most everything but slowly and with a lot of floundering around.

    Itís only in the last decade or so that my skiing has improved. Just turned 56 and this year Iíll be skiing better than last year which is the way itís been for the last few years. I think the change is mostly due to my friends slowing down and not constantly charging the woods. As they slow down and find pleasure cranking turns on groomed trails, Iíve been able to learn the basics. Some friends have given awesome pointers and some have given me absolute crap advice.

    I probably should have taken lessons and learned the basics 30 years ago. Iíll never be able to ski at the level my friends ski at but as they get worse each year they age, Iím getting better. And Iím having a shit ton of fun!

  3. #53
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    Dec 2004
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    Where the sheets have no stains
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    I'm of the opinion that to be an expert skier you have to start as a kid. I'm sure there are exceptions, and there's no reason you can't start as an adult and have a lot of fun and love the sport, but I think there will always be something missing. (I did learn as a kid, but it didn't help.)
    I am going to take the opposing view here. Went skiing for the 1st time at 22, moved to Park City at 26 and skied 100 + days that 1st season following other good skiers. Was recruited into Ski Patrol the next season and for the next 30 years skied 100 days + a season in any and all conditions.

    I consider myself an expert skier. You may not but that isn't the point.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  4. #54
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    Thereís no question that good instruction/coaching is beneficial.
    The question is how to get it cost effectively, on your schedule.

    Where do you live?
    Any night race leagues?

    Camps are great, but how do you know what conditions will be, far in advance?

  5. #55
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    Aug 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shredhead View Post
    Camps are great, but how do you know what conditions will be, far in advance?
    From a learning perspective, I think shitty conditions can help you learn.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  6. #56
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    Dec 2016
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    In a van... down by the river
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunion 2020 View Post
    I am going to take the opposing view here. Went skiing for the 1st time at 22, moved to Park City at 26 and skied 100 + days that 1st season following other good skiers. Was recruited into Ski Patrol the next season and for the next 30 years skied 100 days + a season in any and all conditions.

    I consider myself an expert skier. You may not but that isn't the point.
    I'm totally better than you.


  7. #57
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    Nov 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    From a learning perspective, I think shitty conditions can help you learn.
    Totally, but shit conditions + challenging terrain are also relatively easy to find, especially in Colorado

    Go out on challenging terrain as much as you can, with the best skiers AND boarders (each look at a mountain differently) around, but I'd argue that prolonged time in destinations with top tier terrain and snow has to be part of the equation. I've found my best progression has come on those epic days (ex. true free refill storms, Silverton guided, BC heli) where nearly all terrain features are in play. That 50 degree narrow entry might become approachable when it doesn't resemble a luge track; that 10'+ cliff might go when it doesn't land in a mogul field, etc. etc.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    I'm totally better than you.

    Of course you are, I was talking about mere mortals.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  9. #59
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    Nov 2005
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    Gordy Pfeiffer's Straight-line Camp.
    #1 Get your hands out of your pockets.
    #2 Rock Out with your Cock Out.
    Use both of these every day on the slopes.

  10. #60
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by skt07 View Post
    Good advice to not do a lesson with your wife unless you have similar ability and goals.

    You mentioned Whistler. If youíre mostly focused on off-piste then I highly recommend Extremely Canadian. Either do their 2 day steeps clinic (they put you in a group of 3-4 similar ability) or you can arrange for a private with one of their instructors (you can talk to them about your goals and theyíll match you up with the right instructor).

    Iíve done the two day steeps clinic a couple times and have always come out a better more confident skier. Itís not constant instruction, but rather 1-2 things to focus on and practice while being pushed to ski runs right at and slightly beyond the comfort limit.
    Second this. These guys (and gals) are awesome to ski with and know exactly where on the mountain on what day to take you do whatever it is you are looking for.

  11. #61
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWINS View Post
    Gordy Pfeiffer's Straight-line Camp.
    #1 Get your hands out of your pockets.
    #2 Rock Out with your Cock Out.
    Use both of these every day on the slopes.
    Arms in front!!!!!...still echos to this day. The video review was also sweet and I learned a lot just from watching myself. Have your friends record you. Look at your turns and make those changes.

    I didn't start skiing until I was 28, my folks were not athletic by any means. I'm a much, much better skier than when I started but I can't imagine how good of a skier I would have become had I grown up skiing. Still, every year gets better than the last.

    Just put your mind to it, old people learn how to ski all the time, and old ppl with the desire can indeed be taught new tricks. Not saying you're old, just countering some of the comments here. Who cares how much better you would have been if you started earlier, that's not relevant to the kind of skier you want to become now.

    Don't let others feed you with too many drills (just like this thread). Pick one or two things to progress on. When that's accomplished, go from there to the next thing you want to work on.

    The main thing is to just keep at it. Ski as much as you can while adding these new drills to the same runs, over and over and over. Being repetitive is key to really noticing your improvement, and that is good for your morale. If you do one drill 10 times down the same run, I guarantee you'll notice an improvement in run #10 compared to run #1.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWINS View Post
    Gordy Pfeiffer's Straight-line Camp.
    #1 Get your hands out of your pockets.
    #2 Rock Out with your Cock Out.
    Use both of these every day on the slopes.
    Unless youíre female.

    Then. Itís jam out with your clam out.

  13. #63
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    Mar 2018
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    279
    I think it really depends on the instructor and not the venueÖ.. I have heard a lot of good comments about summer ski camps on hood.

    https://www.mthood.com


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  14. #64
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    Sep 2001
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    upstate NY
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    If you ski a lot, youíre probably going to get good. Best lesson I ever had was when I was 10 or so, my dad got me lessons with the best instructor at our area. One day it was snowing pretty hard and none of the other kids showed up. The instructor said ďfollow meĒ

  15. #65
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post
    Arms in front!!!!!...still echos to this day. The video review was also sweet and I learned a lot just from watching myself. Have your friends record you. Look at your turns and make those changes.

    I didn't start skiing until I was 28, my folks were not athletic by any means. I'm a much, much better skier than when I started but I can't imagine how good of a skier I would have become had I grown up skiing. Still, every year gets better than the last.

    Just put your mind to it, old people learn how to ski all the time, and old ppl with the desire can indeed be taught new tricks. Not saying you're old, just countering some of the comments here. Who cares how much better you would have been if you started earlier, that's not relevant to the kind of skier you want to become now.

    Don't let others feed you with too many drills (just like this thread). Pick one or two things to progress on. When that's accomplished, go from there to the next thing you want to work on.

    The main thing is to just keep at it. Ski as much as you can while adding these new drills to the same runs, over and over and over. Being repetitive is key to really noticing your improvement, and that is good for your morale. If you do one drill 10 times down the same run, I guarantee you'll notice an improvement in run #10 compared to run #1.
    Gordy coaches this because he does nt know what else to say. The fact everyone ever has gotten exactly the same feedback in every straightline camp ever means there was no actual movement/tactical analysis of any skier that ever went to any of those camps. Actual coaching involved watching a skier and being able to replace bad movements with new movement patterns, or teach them how to use their existing movement patterns to do better tactics.

    Just telling people to get their hands up all days and spending lots of money to hear that seem like a grift. Before you call me out I say we can pick a video of someone nas have Gordy MA it, and have me and other coaches due the same with out being able to see the other responses

    I have seen people come out of his camps looking like zombies. I know he is loved here, but its true. I ll say it because you ll hate me anyways and subjective opinion on individuals dont change the objective fact that telling everyone the same exact thing is actually bad coaching and not good coaching. Also people who pay for something will tend to see it was awesome especially with out more perspective on a subject than their one "lesson" they took provides them.

    if you want a "Pro" to teach you Hoji has actual credentials in coaching and so does Plake. I have actually been the guy leading a clinics coaching plake how to coach. Clearly he is amazing adaptable athlete, but while he would be light years better than Gordy in coaching, there are much better coaches I know off. The real issue is all great coaches dont "mesh" with everyone.
    Last edited by Bushwacka; 09-21-2023 at 09:43 PM.

  16. #66
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    Land of the Long Flat Vowel
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    If access to coaching and snow is an issue, maybe just watch tons of videos of Kristofer Turdell.

  17. #67
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwacka View Post
    The real issue is all great coaches dont "mesh" with everyone.

    Anybody with half a brain knew exactly what they were getting into when signing up. The roll call threads were a tell-all. Gordy's camps were just as much if not more of a party and about meeting fellow mags, skiing some spice and having a damned good time. If you were lucky you'd pick up a thing or three, just like with any coaching scenario. Yes, most of us misfits actually were zombies, hung over or still drunk from shenanigans the night before after we finished our reviews having skied our asses off bell to bell. Gordy, Brant, Altabirden and crew handled it with grace and professionalism, and were humorous to boot. Just genuinely good people and a fun time.

    My reference was an inside joke to a fellow mag who was there for a camp *over 15 years ago*. 'Arms in front' became the joke joke that lasted throughout camp, at one point a few of us even ate breakfast with our arms in front.

    I've had the pleasure of skiing with many pros including Plake, Hattrup and Coombs during my tenure in the ski industry. It was my goal back then, especially as an outnumbered female, to ski as best as I possibly could in any terrain so I could keep up with the guys, the pros, the insiders. Don't bag on others for using as many tactics as they can, when and where they can, for becoming a better skier. What works for one person doesn't work for another, greatest coach in the world or not.

    And dude, Gordy got your tighty whities in a wad or what. Take a lap.

  18. #68
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    Now that Bushwacka has chimed in, this thread has officially gone Epic.

  19. #69
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    Sep 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post
    And dude, Gordy got your tighty whities in a wad or what. Take a lap.
    there is guaranteed to be a long argumentative post in response. Don't bother, you don't need the brain damage.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "everybody's got their hooks into you, fuck em....forge on motherfuckers, drag all those bitches across the goal line with you." - (not so) ill-advised strategy

  20. #70
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    Aug 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post
    Anybody with half a brain knew exactly what they were getting into when signing up. The roll call threads were a tell-all. Gordy's camps were just as much if not more of a party and about meeting fellow mags, skiing some spice and having a damned good time. If you were lucky you'd pick up a thing or three, just like with any coaching scenario. Yes, most of us misfits actually were zombies, hung over or still drunk from shenanigans the night before after we finished our reviews having skied our asses off bell to bell. Gordy, Brant, Altabirden and crew handled it with grace and professionalism, and were humorous to boot. Just genuinely good people and a fun time.

    My reference was an inside joke to a fellow mag who was there for a camp *over 15 years ago*. 'Arms in front' became the joke joke that lasted throughout camp, at one point a few of us even ate breakfast with our arms in front.

    I've had the pleasure of skiing with many pros including Plake, Hattrup and Coombs during my tenure in the ski industry. It was my goal back then, especially as an outnumbered female, to ski as best as I possibly could in any terrain so I could keep up with the guys, the pros, the insiders. Don't bag on others for using as many tactics as they can, when and where they can, for becoming a better skier. What works for one person doesn't work for another, greatest coach in the world or not.

    And dude, Gordy got your tighty whities in a wad or what. Take a lap.
    Jax.
    Must say that whether one agrees with you or not, this is a quintessential tgr post.
    Specially that last line...
    Well done.
    By the way, I agree.
    Time spent skiing cannot be deducted from one's life.

  21. #71
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    Apr 2007
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    2,418
    I always wanted to hit a Gordy camp. Iíll never forget his lines in The Realm. One of the most inspirational skiers ever.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  22. #72
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    Feb 2018
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    212
    "When in doubt, go flat out"

    Totally fucked advice.
    Per the usual.

  23. #73
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    Dec 2007
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    I don't know man, when exposed to danger I always think you should go faster:

    Less time exposed to danger = Safer

  24. #74
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    Apr 2003
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    Mammoth Lakes
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    Hmm, Not sure what I would do other than it depends on the actual individual instructor, not what school they are affiliated with. You are most likely to find great skiers and teachers at the various camps, ala JH Steep Camp, La Grave, etc, rather than just taking a one day lesson.

    My best was by ex-US Ski Team coach who taught a parents clinic for parents of kids on ski team. I'm old skool, drive the knees, and he was all about the feet. After literally an hour, he changed how I ski groomers.

    I will 2nd that the ski schools in Yurp are significantly cheaper than the US, skiing is awesome across the pond, especially from a cultural point of view, and the general level of instructors, especially in places like St. Anton is pretty amazing. I had one guy who took us ripping around the Arlberg backcountry on 155cm slaloms and just crushed it. Turns out he ski raced growing up with Mario Matt. I thought I was ok back then and he just crushed all of us. Didn't learn a ton, but much respect!
    He who has the most fun wins!

  25. #75
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    Sep 2008
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    Geopolis
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    i went to mad river with some friends about 15 years ago. the skiing levels were uneven so we decided for some reason itíd be a good idea to rent tele gear and take a lesson. we spent the day with ďheidiĒ who was charming, funny and, although older than us, foxxxxy. we all tried our best to get her to party with us but no luck. still the best lesson and max laughs per hour i ever had, and itís nice to know that if i had to ski 2k vert of refrozen bumps on tele skis itíd be a piece of cake (with no stops)
    j'ai des grands instants de lucididididididididi

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