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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    The better LA
    Posts
    2,546
    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Attachment 472280Attachment 472281
    I wish I could blame this on the LBS. I also wish I could say I caught it before doing several rides.


    Sent from my iPad using TGR Forums
    If anyone asks, just say that's how you break in new chains.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jer View Post
    After the first three seconds, Corbet's is really pretty average.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Malcolm View Post
    I mean, it's not your fault. They say talent skips a generation.
    But hey, I'm sure your kids will be sharp as tacks.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    6,769
    Quote Originally Posted by Roxtar View Post
    If anyone asks, just say that's how you break in new chains.
    The plastic polymers grind off and lubricate the chain. Brilliant.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    5,224
    I don't know if I'm the idiot here, but
    I bought a used XC FS bike a month ago. It was cheap, but needed some maintenance done to it. Bought it off a high school racer that outgrew it and needed money for a new bike.
    Norco Revolver with Fox factory on it. The rear float shock was kind of stiff, I figured it needed a service. Got to looking at it Monday and realized it had a 3 position lockout on it, and no one had ever hooked a cable up to it/no lockout lever on the bike. The kid had been riding the bike with the rear shock in the locked position the whole time he had it.
    I'm baffled.
    Last edited by sfotex; 10-11-2023 at 01:15 PM.
    When life gives you haters, make haterade.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,663
    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    It's turning into the end of the season and my rear tire stopped holding air. Since today may have been my last ride before hunting season is in full swing rather than adding a bit of sealant I decided to pop the bead off the tire to take a peak and look if I really needed to add some sealant. I managed to knock the tape out of place bad enough that I had to retape the tire. Then my lazyness kicked in and I threw a tube in as a problem for future me to deal with.

    All to save 4 bucks of sealant.
    Guess what just made me make a trip to the LBS for another roll of Stans tape. On the plus side I got a roll that is much more appropriately sized for my rims so I don't think I'll have the issues I did last year.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Treading Water
    Posts
    6,759
    I relates to this


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    However many are in a shit ton.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    12,530
    I resemble that story.

    I went OTB pretty hard on my last ride last season. I haven't even gotten the bike out of the corner of the garage to see what the damage was... Just know I remember the bike (and my leg/knee) taking the bashing.
    www.dpsskis.com
    www.point6.com
    formerly an ambassador for a few others, but the ski industry is... interesting.
    Fukt: a very small amount of snow.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,663
    Future me called past me a lazy asshole.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Treading Water
    Posts
    6,759
    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    Future me called past me a lazy asshole.
    That judgmental prick. He probably doesn’t even know the context!


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    However many are in a shit ton.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Greg_o
    Posts
    2,702
    I bled my brakes over the winter. First time doing it. At the time they felt great afterwards.

    Took this bike out today for my first ride since and the front has almost no stopping power. Pumped the lever for awhile which helped slightly but it's still really under powered.

    Can I simply top up the reservoir or should I rebleed it?

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    8,458
    Shimano? If so, thread the bleed cup on with some fluid and just pump a few times. See if any air bubbles come to the surface. It's quick and easy and may be the only issue.

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Greg_o
    Posts
    2,702
    Yes Shimano BR-MT520. Great - thank you, will give that a go, hopefully that's that.

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    4,915
    Destroyed a hub on a $2400 wheel set.
    I was pressing out some bearings because I feel it's "safer" than DT's suggested process of hammering the axle to remove the bearings.
    One of my drifts slightly moved and while pressing from the other side it folded over the lip of the center lock threads, completely destroyed the hub.
    It's a DT system wheel, so a commercially available 240 straight pull hub has different dimensions so the spoke calculations would be different, the nipples are a specific inverted internal style, and the spokes are not common.

    So I sent it to DT to have them rebuild it, and eat the cost of a new hub, spokes, nipples, labor and shipping. Luckily it was the cheaper front wheel, but it still hurts.
    Some days you're the dog, and some days you're the fire hydrant......

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Treading Water
    Posts
    6,759
    User name checks out!

    (Seriously though, that blows. Sorry to hear)


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    However many are in a shit ton.

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    The better LA
    Posts
    2,546
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Destroyed a hub on a $2400 wheel set.
    I was pressing out some bearings because I feel it's "safer" than DT's suggested process of hammering the axle to remove the bearings.
    One of my drifts slightly moved and while pressing from the other side it folded over the lip of the center lock threads, completely destroyed the hub.
    It's a DT system wheel, so a commercially available 240 straight pull hub has different dimensions so the spoke calculations would be different, the nipples are a specific inverted internal style, and the spokes are not common.

    So I sent it to DT to have them rebuild it, and eat the cost of a new hub, spokes, nipples, labor and shipping. Luckily it was the cheaper front wheel, but it still hurts.
    Some days you're the dog, and some days you're the fire hydrant......
    Ouch
    Sorry
    Quote Originally Posted by Jer View Post
    After the first three seconds, Corbet's is really pretty average.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Malcolm View Post
    I mean, it's not your fault. They say talent skips a generation.
    But hey, I'm sure your kids will be sharp as tacks.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    5,224
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Destroyed a hub on a $2400 wheel set.
    I was pressing out some bearings because I feel it's "safer" than DT's suggested process of hammering the axle to remove the bearings.
    One of my drifts slightly moved and while pressing from the other side it folded over the lip of the center lock threads, completely destroyed the hub.
    It's a DT system wheel, so a commercially available 240 straight pull hub has different dimensions so the spoke calculations would be different, the nipples are a specific inverted internal style, and the spokes are not common.

    So I sent it to DT to have them rebuild it, and eat the cost of a new hub, spokes, nipples, labor and shipping. Luckily it was the cheaper front wheel, but it still hurts.
    Some days you're the dog, and some days you're the fire hydrant......
    Yeah, did a similar recently on a much cheaper front DT wheel. I didn't realize how fragile that lock ring mount....
    When life gives you haters, make haterade.

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
    Posts
    4,915
    Quote Originally Posted by sfotex View Post
    Yeah, did a similar recently on a much cheaper front DT wheel. I didn't realize how fragile that lock ring mount....
    I have a DIY tool I use to protect it, but for some reason I went a different route and tried a drift that moved on me.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    565
    Decided to take to a 3-4hr ride in the coast range this weekend, knew rain was likely so I packed an extra wool layer and gloves. The rain never let up and temps were in the low 40s. I ended up 20miles from home and shivering in a trailhead portapotty. Heard someone leaving the trailhead which ended up being an open bed truck so I flagged him down and got a 5mile shuttle out of the hills and down to warmer temps.

    I was smart enough to pack an extra layer but should’ve turned around much earlier. I’m fairly new to road/gravel and the descents really take the heat away

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    14,941
    Always have a wind vest or shell for temps under 60f.


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  19. #119
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Land of Brine Shrimp and Magic Underwear
    Posts
    6,818
    I'd likely have worn a quality rain jacket from the get-go in those conditions. At least packed one.
    There's nothing better than sliding down snow, and flying through the air

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    31,309
    I am sorry but the right people don't use packs on a mtn bike

    instead they pay a lot of money to stash their shit on the bike
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  21. #121
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    565
    Failed to mention, I did have a Houdini on the whole time, it was soaked through in the first 10minutes. Winter riding shoes would’ve certainly helped. I guess a win was the hood did warm me up quite a bit once I put it on.

    I think I’ll still to fair-weather gravel riding, I find running to be much easier in regulating body temps in these conditions, plus less wear/tear on the bike.

  22. #122
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SLCizzy
    Posts
    3,574
    Quote Originally Posted by benk View Post
    Decided to take to a 3-4hr ride in the coast range this weekend, knew rain was likely so I packed an extra wool layer and gloves. The rain never let up and temps were in the low 40s. I ended up 20miles from home and shivering in a trailhead portapotty. Heard someone leaving the trailhead which ended up being an open bed truck so I flagged him down and got a 5mile shuttle out of the hills and down to warmer temps.

    I was smart enough to pack an extra layer but should’ve turned around much earlier. I’m fairly new to road/gravel and the descents really take the heat away
    This shit is great. That’s a bicycle ride you will remember. Builds character.
    ABL: Always Be Learning


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  23. #123
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Evergreen Co
    Posts
    999
    Probably the coldest ride I’ve been on in my life was pedaling up to Mount Baker. Left the car in 40 degree rain. Climbed into snow. Was mildly chilly getting to the top wearing all of my layers that had started to soak through.

    Descending on a bike while cold, wet and underdressed is a unique type of brutal (hypothermic?). There comes a point where you can’t “just power through”. I’ve skied in -30 degree temps with far fewer issues.

    The line between “fine” and feeling like you’re freezing to death is pretty narrow. Good to celebrate being back to the car.

    Quote Originally Posted by benk View Post
    Decided to take to a 3-4hr ride in the coast range this weekend, knew rain was likely so I packed an extra wool layer and gloves. The rain never let up and temps were in the low 40s. I ended up 20miles from home and shivering in a trailhead portapotty. Heard someone leaving the trailhead which ended up being an open bed truck so I flagged him down and got a 5mile shuttle out of the hills and down to warmer temps.

    I was smart enough to pack an extra layer but should’ve turned around much earlier. I’m fairly new to road/gravel and the descents really take the heat away

  24. #124
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    31,309
    this time of year I don't go out on a bike if its raining but I been wearing ski touring gear so soft shell pants, gortex shell, ski gloves with a gauntlet and its perfect
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  25. #125
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    772
    Quote Originally Posted by Tailwind View Post
    Probably the coldest ride I’ve been on in my life was pedaling up to Mount Baker. Left the car in 40 degree rain. Climbed into snow. Was mildly chilly getting to the top wearing all of my layers that had started to soak through.

    Descending on a bike while cold, wet and underdressed is a unique type of brutal (hypothermic?). There comes a point where you can’t “just power through”. I’ve skied in -30 degree temps with far fewer issues.

    The line between “fine” and feeling like you’re freezing to death is pretty narrow. Good to celebrate being back to the car.
    I managed to convince my wife a nice long ride up to Washington Pass from the East side closure was a good idea last Saturday. Colder than expected, stopped to do some jumping jacks on the way down but we were both pretty miserable, her more so. Pretty quiet drive back.

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