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Thread: Garden 2023

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCMtnHound View Post
    Some gorgeous planting being posted. Our plots are doing well, hope to take and post pics soon.

    Woke up to 4C this morning, and the day got to a high of 28C. Folks just down the highway got a nip of frost overnight, some lost a few softer plantings. Frost is traditionally gone a week before the May long weekend. The last good frost we got this year was in mid Apr. Most of the snow up to 2000m has melted on south faces. This weather is crazy.
    I'm still getting frequent frosts. Put a bucket of dahlia tubers against the south side of the house, wrapped in frost cloth. Roulette.
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  2. #77
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    Sounds like yall need a cold frame oar mebbie a grow house.

    Its pretty dry here and my garlic is starting to turn, about 3 weeks early. Only cut the scapes off a week ago.
    watch out for snakes

  3. #78
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    Yes, that's exactly what I need, cold frames and greenhouses. I do have a south facing patio, buys me 5-10 degF, the concrete is a good heat sink. That plus frost cloths gives me some hope.
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  4. #79
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    Finally getting some sun and warm on the Front Range. Better get a few extra cages for the tomato plants that currently don't have them...

    Weeds are a huge fuckin' problem right now too - all the rain and being out of town for two weeks has resulted in a shitload of new weeds.

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  5. #80
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    Sep 2007
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    tetons
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    Garden 2023

    Quote Originally Posted by shera View Post
    babybear is that Bishop's Weed (Snow on the mountain) in the last pic? Is it giving you any trouble in that bed? I've got a north facing spot under pine trees (worst case scenario for plant life) and I love the way it lights up the shade. Still considering whether to just leave it as forest floor or plant it...

    And I love how you've got everything planted close, looks great. I always plant close, for the aesthetics, even for food. No problem with humidity and airflow here though.
    thank you! I think I plant closely also because I crave the lushness of my VT upbringing

    Yes bishops weed by the gate.
    I have had that there for several years now and it hasnít migrated into the garden (probably also because I keep the other part of the garden tightly packed)
    The woodruff and moneywort are almost more of an issue crowding out the other plants but I just rip out handfuls of them if they are crowding too much. I love how those mingle together though.
    Re: the bishops weed- I also like how it brightens the shady zone by the gate. I read that the variegation is a recessive trait and frequently the plant will start to grow the green/ unvariegated leaves. You must remove the unvariegated leaves or they will eventually to overtake the variegated leaves. so far I have just ripped out any green leaves by hand and they have stayed as is.

    I also like to go ďCharleston styleĒ on my window boxes. We did a couple days there a few years ago and I was enthralled by the planters and window boxes
    skid luxury

  6. #81
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    Ha, I also like the lush look, due to growing up in the land of cactus. :P
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  7. #82
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    Dec 2012
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    I can still smell Poutine.
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    Another VTer here voting for lush. And lush vegetation.

  8. #83
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    I prefer bushes that are neatly manicured and trimmed. IMO the natural wild tangled look can be a bit offputting.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  9. #84
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    We did some micro greens inside earlier this year. They turned out tasty.
    watch out for snakes

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    I prefer bushes that are neatly manicured and trimmed. IMO the natural wild tangled look can be a bit offputting.
    I like natural.

  11. #86
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    Dec 2012
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    To each his/her own. Take babybear's bush for example. IMO it could use a trim to get rid of some of the random and dead branches.
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    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  12. #87
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    Apr 2004
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    Southeast New York
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    Sculpted landscaping is interesting but I find it ugly. If the plant wanted to grow that way it would. Sure, clip the dead shit but no shaping.

  13. #88
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    I like to consider a golf course. You've got your putting green, your fairway, and your rough. All good, each in its place.

    Also I like to copy a natural clearing in the woods. Grass in the middle then layers going up.
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  14. #89
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    Are we talking about gardening still or something else?

  15. #90
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    PNW
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  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    Sculpted landscaping is interesting but I find it ugly. If the plant wanted to grow that way it would. Sure, clip the dead shit but no shaping.
    I'm not talking about pom-pom bushes.

    You need to do a bit of shaping to encourage new growth and keep the plants from getting too leggy. You do it at the right time of year so they still flower.

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    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  17. #92
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    Feb 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by riser4 View Post
    Are we talking about gardening still or something else?
    Donít know but Iím feelin a bit randy right now.


    Maybe Iíll go sit on my lawnmower or something.

  18. #93
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    Sep 2007
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    tetons
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    wow what a creepy weird turn to posting flower pics.
    I never claimed to be a landscape gardener just enjoying some flowers.
    skid luxury

  19. #94
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    I used to be a landscape gardener. Now just have my own little place, but it's still an obsession. The water that comes out of my hose is so cold that I keep a tank in the sun, trying not to shock the starts.

    Just finished watching Chelsea flower show and the overarching theme was wildflowers (weeds) in the garden. Sustainability, climate change, pollinators, etc. Lawns are out!
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  20. #95
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    Dec 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by babybear View Post
    wow what a creepy weird turn to posting flower pics.
    I never claimed to be a landscape gardener just enjoying some flowers.
    Well, this place can get weird sometimes. Just hang in there bb.

    Quote Originally Posted by shera View Post
    I used to be a landscape gardener. Now just have my own little place, but it's still an obsession. The water that comes out of my hose is so cold that I keep a tank in the sun, trying not to shock the starts.

    Just finished watching Chelsea flower show and the overarching theme was wildflowers (weeds) in the garden. Sustainability, climate change, pollinators, etc. Lawns are out!
    I just try to find out what grows well in my soil and don't force it. I tried to grow delphiniums for 2 seasons and it never worked. Or try to grow prairie wildflowers in an acid clay soil like we have and they won't survive. Sometimes grass is just easier.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  21. #96
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    I adore grass, long, short, wild, ornamental, cut short, bushwacked, grown tall, love them all!

    Somebody told me that the great plains grasses were so tall that you could tie it in a knot over your horse while you were riding. Like maybe 9' tall? Makes me sad that rich topsoil is now spent on monoculture. The buffalo worked the ground in a special way to create the fertility. Give me the buffalo meat and skip the wheat corn and soy monoculture!

    I have a 5 lb bag of Midnight Kentucky Bluegrass, so excited to get that going. I also grow delphiniums, they do really well here, love the cold and the bright sun makes them stout and strong.
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  22. #97
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    Dec 2012
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    Yeah I imagine delphiniums grow well by you. Love the blues. We do have some indigo that does well in our garden.

    I was out in LA earlier in the year and had some time to walk thru the LA Arboretum. Really neat place with plants from all over the world--if I can dig out some pics I'll upload a few here.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  23. #98
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    Poppies do so well here. I seeded this path 1.5 years ago, finally seeing something happening! I spy a native yarrow bud (white) in the corner there. That'll be pretty.

    Need to work on my photography, hahaha, those flowers are blurry. Well, I tried.

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    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  24. #99
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    Norseman and Timberridge, your gardens are beautiful. I bet that honeysuckle smells divine.

    I'm considering growing strawberries. A lot of them.
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  25. #100
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    Oct 2003
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    Seattle
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    Hanging baskets starting to fill in nicely.
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