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Thread: That 70s Thread

  1. #201
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    Meh. My comment was tongue in cheek.

    He’s hardly the worst of the 70s. But not my cup of tea.

  2. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunion 2020 View Post
    Fuck off CS. Music is all about what appeals to each of us. Fogleberg created some good stuff and I saw him warm up for another act and the guy actually rocked.
    Quoted for posterity
    Holy fuck, defending Dan Fogleberg, fuck bunion, I always thought you were lame, but Jesus Christ dude, Dan Foglberg!
    crab in my shoe mouth

  3. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Fuck you. And your fogelberg

    Worst music of the decade.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ggNIZ1aZxhI

  4. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiJ View Post
    If you think that’s good music. I can’t help you.
    Nostalgia is interesting.

    The first album I bought with my own money was tea for the tiller man.

    I still love it. Holds up well.



    And it fits the seventies thread.

  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by buttahflake View Post
    Quoted for posterity
    Holy fuck, defending Dan Fogleberg, fuck bunion, I always thought you were lame, but Jesus Christ dude, Dan Foglberg!
    Please post 1 example of anything you have ever created.

    And the fact that you think I am lame gives me warm and fuzzies cause I don't think of you at all.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  6. #206
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    Speaking of albums from the seventies.



    First three sided album I ever had.
    They didn’t even mention it. You discovered by accident that the B side had two concentric grooves.

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry View Post
    I count three 90s appreciation threads on the front page. Enough. We all know the best years to come of age were the 70s.

    1) chicks all wore halter tops and bell bottom jeans.
    2) 1975 rode a train to Chicago and saw Blue Oyster Cult at the Aragon Ballroom.
    3) 1976 Lynyrd Skynyrd in Madison right after Free Bird came out. FUCK YEAH.

    The 70s were hands down the best decade to be a teenager.

    Attachment 416250





    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    The thread is about the 1970s -

    Fogelberg achieved popularity in the '70s.
    That's all --
    ( as I mentioned, he is well down my list. and he was relevant for thirty years, from the 1970s )

    CoreShot, did not ask for your help, do not want your "help" -
    That your 'tongue-in-cheek' response was what it was, speaks volumes ( about you) ;
    I let it pass - until you double-down, and offered Cat Stevens and Monty Python as your examples of musical excellence of the '70s...

    really.

    'tongue-in-cheek' -

    I hope you have a great week. tj

    And
    take your own "help" .

  8. #208
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    FOLKelberg's Amercana.. Contemporary American folk music, even got folk in his name (well not really but sounds like it). If you don't like him you probably also don't like Harry Chapin, James Taylor, or Jim Croce..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  9. #209
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    My parents had an all-killer, no-filler record collection that spanned from before I was born into the early 80s. Full Beatles catalog, Stones, Who, Doors, Byrds, Jefferson Airplane, Beach Boys, CSN&Y, Skynyrd, Allman Bros, Supertramp, Elton John, BOC, Doobie Bros, Fleetwood Mac...

    This is the first record I bought with my own money from mowing lawns
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    Last edited by Ted Striker; 05-23-2022 at 12:45 PM. Reason: typo

  10. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    FOLKelberg's Amercana.. Contemporary American folk music, even got folk in his name (well not really but sounds like it). If you don't like him you probably also don't like Harry Chapin, James Taylor, or Jim Croce..
    Love Jim Croce and Harry Chapin. Hard not to.
    I’ve developed a love of James Taylor and Carly Simon over time.

    Post a Fogelberg song that’s good. Change my mind.

    I actually tried. YouTube. I had to press the stop button. Not sure what it is about him. And me. Oh well.
    I did find a cool tribute album of famous stars doing his covers.

    And damn. He died young. Thought he was still making cheesy music. RIP

  11. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Love Jim Croce and Harry Chapin. Hard not to.
    I’ve developed a love of James Taylor and Carly Simon over time.

    Post a Fogelberg song that’s good. Change my mind.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  12. #212
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    My

    This is the first record I bought with my own money from mowing lawns
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    That should be a new thread. Doesn’t apply to the young kids.
    But the first album or CD you bought is memorable.

    Kids today have no idea and never will.

    PS. I love that first Devo album. It’s playing in my head now.

    If you read about the history and origin of devo they were some crazy whack jobs. And brilliant.

    A good friend ended up with a Downs kid. She’s so sweet. But I still love the mongoloid song. As a twenty something that thinks to much it made me happy. Still does. He wore a hat. He had a job. And he was happier than you and me.

    Space junk? Her name was sally in the alley. She never saw it. She was hit by space junk.

  13. #213
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    Gerald Casale was at the Kent State shooting. Devo was art-rock, social comment, comedy, and catchy songs.

    Mick Jagger liked their cover of Satisfaction.

    https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/what-mi...-satisfaction/

  14. #214
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    RE: Fogelberg.

    High Country Snow is a pretty good Blue Grass influenced album. But it is from the 80s.

    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  15. #215
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    Not trying to change anyone's mind -

    released when Fogelberg was 30, his father - also a musician and band leader, died the following year ;

    it is a good song. I have no interest in the argument of whether or not it is good music ;
    it was written by a still young man as a tribute to his father.
    it is that --


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsoc...rv=UEPsXxgnCpQ


    Leader of the Band
    Dan Fogelberg

    An only child
    alone and wild
    A cabinet maker's son
    His hands were meant for different work
    And his heart was known to none
    He left his home and went his lone and solitary way
    And he gave to me a gift I know I never can repay

    A quiet man of music
    Denied a simpler fate
    He tried to be a soldier once But his music wouldn't wait
    He earned his love through discipline - A thundering, velvet hand
    His gentle means of sculpting souls took me years to understand

    The leader of the band is tired
    And his eyes are growing old
    But his blood runs through my instrument
    And his song is in my soul
    My life has been a poor attempt
    To imitate the man
    I'm just a living legacy To the leader of the band


    My brothers' lives were different
    For they heard another call
    One went to Chicago
    And the other to St. Paul
    And I'm in Colorado
    When I'm not in some hotel
    Living out this life I've chose
    And come to know so well

    I thank you for the music
    And your stories of the road
    I thank you for the freedom
    When it came my time to go
    I thank you for the kindness
    And the times when you got tough
    And, papa, I don't think I said
    'I love you' near enough

    The leader of the band is tired
    And his eyes are growing old
    But his blood runs through my instrument
    And his song is in my soul
    My life has been a poor attempt
    To imitate the man
    I'm just a living legacy
    To the leader of the band
    I am a living legacy to the leader of the band

    Songwriters: Dan Fogelberg

  16. #216
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    You changed my mind. He’s a great writer.

    His voice and vocal style still ain’t my tea. It’s like Bob Dylan. Some folks can’t take it. But the words are so good.

  17. #217
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    Love, love love Fogelberg. I know most of his songs by heart, and still shed a tear or two to this day when hearing/singing along some of them, such as Leader of the Band.

    I also love Bread, Moody Blues (late 60's/early 70's), America, The Guess Who (also late 60's/early 70s hits). Guys just don't sing or write music like that today. Who doesn't love Sister Golden Hair, or Ventura Highway, Horse with No Name, Baby I'm a want You, No Sugar Tonight, American Woman.

    For some reason I put all these guys together even though some of their hits were from the late 60's, or right at 1970, the music was a part of my life growing up in the 70s and for me I'll never forget.

    And of course how can we not mention Neil Young's solo stuff, Helpless, Only Love Can Break Your Heart, Heart of Gold, Old Man, my favorite Tell Me Why.....on and on...

    I love my crooners and again, though Young's music spans decades like many of the bands listed above, for me it's this stuff they put out late 60s/early 70s that is sentimental and meaningful to me, and music that defines that decade for me. I sing a lot, have a decent voice, so perhaps that's why I love so many vocalists that many think are cheesy from the 70s.

    To each their own.

  18. #218
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    Man do I hate the Moody Blues. But the Guess Who was decent, for Canadians. That Young fella, same deal. The best of the Guess Who was the favorite album of a guy I worked for, I must have heard it 100 times. Holds up pretty well.

  19. #219
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    I don't think I've ever met a man who liked the Moody Blues come to think of it.

    Funny Core Shot because I loathe James Taylor and Carly Simon. Never ever did I like either one of them, their sound, and especially together. Ick. James Taylor had/has a very nasal-y voice to me. Same with Joni Mitchell. I could not stand her voice or lyrics. But popular they all were at the time.

  20. #220
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    I've seen The Moody Blues 3 times.. But, the only time I paid to see them was because my wife loves them hahaha!
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  21. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post
    I don't think I've ever met a man who liked the Moody Blues come to think of it.

    Funny Core Shot because I loathe James Taylor and Carly Simon. Never ever did I like either one of them, their sound, and especially together. Ick. James Taylor had/has a very nasal-y voice to me. Same with Joni Mitchell. I could not stand her voice or lyrics. But popular they all were at the time.
    Never liked the moody blues until I was trippin
    Now I can’t listen at all.

    Taylor and Simon I hated and then a decade or two later I found them soothing.

    It’s all good. Musical taste is like assholes. Ass tastes like shit.

  22. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post

    And of course how can we not mention Neil Young's solo stuff, Helpless, Only Love Can Break Your Heart, Heart of Gold, Old Man, my favorite Tell Me Why.....on and on...

    .

    I gotta mention Live at Massey Hall as one of my faves of his.


    Setlist

    Though the set of songs featured that night was similar to other concerts during the tour, the bulk of the songs played would have been unfamiliar to the audience. Of the eighteen songs Young performed during his second set that night, only eight had already appeared on record. These include songs that Young recorded with the bandsBuffalo SpringfieldandCrosby, Stills, Nash & Young, or had released on one of his three solo albums to date.
    Five additional songs performed would appear one year later on the landmark albumHarvest(though there are noticeable differences in the lyrics on "A Man Needs a Maid"). One song, "Bad Fog of Loneliness," makes its first appearance with this release. The remaining four songs would see the light of day on subsequent 1970s albums. "Love in Mind" and "Journey Through the Past" would appear on the 1973 live albumTime Fades Away. "See the Sky About to Rain" was released in a different arrangement on the 1974 albumOn the Beach."Dance Dance Dance" would appear onCrazy Horse's February 1971debut album, and rewritten with new lyrics on the 1977 compilation albumDecadeas "Love Is a Rose." The reworked version later became a hit forLinda Ronstadt.
    Many of the songs appear in a form that virtually duplicates live takes found on other albums. "Cowgirl in the Sand," "Don't Let It Bring You Down," and "Down By the River" are unchanged from the versions that appear on4 Way Street. "Journey Through the Past" and "Love in Mind" are similar to the performances found onTime Fades Away. "The Needle and the Damage Done" appeared in a live cut on the otherwise studio albumHarvest.

  23. #223
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    This was in my suggested feed last night, and it's my first intro to Japanese jazz/funk. Good stuff!

  24. #224
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    ' twas a warm Summer evening
    on a train bound for nowhere... '

    : )

    skiJ

  25. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    I gotta mention Live at Massey Hall as one of my faves of his.
    Also one of my favs. His voice at that time, along with the halls acoustics, was so good compared to just a decade later on both live and studio recordings.

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