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  1. #26
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    Who was your surgeon?

  2. #27
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    i think these guys are some of the best in the state. have to check my insurance but i assume slc docs would be out of network. just found out my mri was authorized.
    I know it's too late for this instance, but you should ditch your health insurance and go with a health share plan instead. Much smaller premium, small deductibles ($500-1000), and there's no such thing as a network. You don't have to worry about which doctor or surgeon you use, much less what country you're in. Everything is covered no matter where you go or what happens to you (with some exceptions, obviously). With your travel and activity level, it seems like a way better option for you. Standard health insurance fucking sucks.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by smmokan View Post
    I know it's too late for this instance, but you should ditch your health insurance and go with a health share plan instead. Much smaller premium, small deductibles ($500-1000), and there's no such thing as a network. You don't have to worry about which doctor or surgeon you use, much less what country you're in. Everything is covered no matter where you go or what happens to you (with some exceptions, obviously). With your travel and activity level, it seems like a way better option for you. Standard health insurance fucking sucks.
    All health share plans I’ve seen are Christian ministry based 501c3s that operate as a PPO. Besides the obvious issue of not covering all procedures, there’s this:

    Members are part of a preferred provider organization (PPO), which means they receive pre-negotiated rates when they use providers in that network. If a member uses a non-PPO physician or facility, they may have to pay out-of-network prices or even cover the entire bill.
    Improve your AT boots with the StrapOff. It’s Maggot Approved.

  5. #30
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    Thanks for the info touring sedan. Ive had general anesthesia and twilight/propofol several times over the years for diff surgeries. not too worried about that. my pt is awesome. hes one of the owners of the place and races mtb himself.

  6. #31
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by altacoup View Post
    ^^^
    Only for minor tears. Long list of MLB pitchers undergoing rotator cuff surgery. Return to elite level pitching is 50/50. Tommy John surgery is now considered less detrimental to a pitching career. Large tears almost always require surgery, unless the tendon has retracted too far in which case surgery is very rarely successful and a fucked shoulder until replacement is usually the prognosis. There being 4 muscles that make up the rotator cuff there’s a lot a variability injury to injury. Very good to excellent outcomes for 90-95 percent of people who aren’t pro. Hence the need for a really good surgeon. Also a lot of those pitchers with small tears get surgery after retirement. Personally my labrum is ok, but supraspinatus has full and partial tear.

    Bummer that yours can’t be repaired. Same shoulder you had worked on previously?


    Sent from my iPad using TGR Forums
    I played baseball/football (SS/QB) and want/need to throw with my baby boy when he's older, so my needs for physical ability are different than if I just skied and rode bikes. I'm actually pretty much fine skiing and biking. Well, not fine, but my shoulder doesn't prevent me from skiing and MTB.


    And yeah, same shoulder that received the repair surgery 15 years ago.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    Thanks for the info touring sedan. Ive had general anesthesia and twilight/propofol several times over the years for diff surgeries. not too worried about that. my pt is awesome. hes one of the owners of the place and races mtb himself.
    A couple other thoughts.

    There's bit of numbness at my incision points. Pretty unnoticeable but it weirds me out on occasion.

    Get all your shit in order before you go under the knife. I changed the oil, rotated the tires, swapped the shit in the attic, installed the ski racks, cleaned up the yard, did a shit ton of stuff with the family.... etc. Mentally, that made it much easier to Netflix and chill for the week after surgery.
    Last edited by Touring_Sedan; 04-17-2022 at 09:58 PM.

  9. #34
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    I did the same kind of thing ^^ pre-ACL surgery

    also put some dinners in the freezer
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  10. #35
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    So no mri unti 4/26. Damn. Thats 16 days from injury. i guess thats normal when living in a non-city.

    There are slc surgeons in my network, but getting surgery there adds more logistics and cost....

  11. #36
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    One more anecdote for you:

    My injury was a bit different than it sounds like yours is because it was bony - I had a fragment of my glenoid detached, but comparatively minor labrum damage. My Dr. immediately recommended surgery after reviewing a CT, and told me I would have lifelong shoulder instability without it. They reattached the chunk of bone using the same type of anchors and tape that are typically used for a labrum repair (and also cleaned up the labrum a bit as well) in an arthroscopic surgery. I crashed my bike on July 22 2020, had surgery July 31, and started doing mellow miles on my road bike in mid November. I rode just green eagle at copper city during a warm spell that December and felt ok, but I wasn't ready for a real downhill. By March, I was riding as normal again, and felt good on a trip to Moab. I saw the PT twice a week from August to December, and worked at it pretty religiously on my own on the other days. I have 4 small scars on my shoulder now. It's strong, and my range of motion is good, except for reaching above my head and back at the same time, where I still feel a bit tight. I have not had any instability since. I'm 39, and was 37 when I had my injury.

    I'll echo the "it feels like it will never get better until one day it does" experience. Be patient, don't push it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post

    regardless of surgery or not im gonna go crazy with pt and lifting and come out swole.
    My experience is that you need to be careful with this. It's easy for athletes to overdo it when you're anxious to get back at it. Listen to your PT, and don't do more than they're telling you to, even if you feel like you can. I got a little too optimistic during my recovery and set myself back several painful weeks because I was too enthusiastic.
    Last edited by elesquiador; 04-18-2022 at 02:40 PM.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    So no mri unti 4/26. Damn. Thats 16 days from injury. i guess thats normal when living in a non-city.

    There are slc surgeons in my network, but getting surgery there adds more logistics and cost....
    Youll want to get to your safe, comfy lazyboy chair ASAP after surgery and not leave for at least 5 days postop. multihour roadtrips or flights in the days following a shoulder reconstruction sound like some life reconsidering choices. YMMV.

    Get the ice machine, and make sure everything you need from chargers, to books, to remotes to edibles is on the free hand side in easy reach. Simple, easy things now, like reaching or leaning forward a little bit will be painful enough to break a sweat in the couple days postop. I personally found much greater pain relief from small amounts of weed than from any pills (larger doses didnt help oddly), though i did utilize the pills to knock me out. If you have a partner or trusted buddy, i would recomend you have them help with passive motion a couple times per day- have them grab your wrist and elbow and super slowly support your arm through a less-than-full range of motion with ZERO muscular input from you.

  13. #38
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    I was also kinda surprised they fixed it with a Dremel and some kitchen twine.








  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    About 13 years ago I had my labrum, shoulder capsule and biceps tendon done. They say shoulder surgery is one of the most painful surgeries. They're right.
    I had labrum and rotator cuff done also about 13 years ago and will say that for me it was much less painful than ACL reconstruction (I've had three), but I've never heard anyone else compare. I think if you know how to use the meds and are careful it's not so bad--I recall using script meds for two days before going to OTC briefly.

    Quote Originally Posted by bonewrenched View Post
    I think the skill of the surgeon is really important. I was lucky and ended up with a guy who also works on pro baseball / football players. One-incision arthroscopy and he tightened it up the perfect amount.
    I agree, but my surgery was essentially a complete failure. One of the top guys here in NYC (was ortho for the Nets--actually, maybe that means he wasn't a top guy...) at an ortho specific hospital and my shoulder was exactly the same after surgery as before. I don't know why--he showed me the photos when I had a follow-up (I could see everything nicely tied/stapled down) and he was pleased, but after about 6 (maybe 8) weeks of PT, when we started doing throwing stuff, I began to wonder why my shoulder didn't seem to be any better (this was light tossing stuff, but I was still able to tell). Went back to the ortho to tell him and he prescribed extra PT which I did to no effect (total was probably almost 20 weeks of PT, in addition to what I did prior to surgery). I've basically given up on my shoulder as it (almost) only affects me when I'm throwing a baseball/softball, which I don't do much anymore. Strangely I can still serve in tennis at 95% with virtually no pain, but if I try to throw a baseball from second to first (90 feet) I might bounce it and it feels like someone is ramming an ice pick into my shoulder. Every now and then while skiing bumps if I have to pole plant in a way that pulls my hand up to head level it hurts, but I can ski and play hockey without ever noticing the shoulder, basically. So I guess I'm just going to leave it.

    Obviously my experience doesn't mean anything for anyone else, but going into this I had no idea about the failure rate--I (stupidly) assumed it would be like knee surgery, which has always worked perfectly for me.
    [quote][//quote]

  15. #40
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    Currently PT'ing labral tears in both shoulders. Surgery was suggested for the left. They would "repair" the labrum and move the attachment point of the biceps tendon. Right side hasn't been imaged, but doc is pretty certain it's the same injury and same treatment.

    Going on 7 years with the left (3ish with the right), and still not sure if I want to get surgery. If I keep the strength up, they don't bother me. When I slack, the pain returns. I'm generally in favor of not getting surgery unless absolutely necessary, and I'm fine with things now, but am concerned about later in life and a more difficult recovery as I get older.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dexter Rutecki View Post
    I had labrum and rotator cuff done also about 13 years ago and will say that for me it was much less painful than ACL reconstruction (I've had three), but I've never heard anyone else compare. I think if you know how to use the meds and are careful it's not so bad--I recall using script meds for two days before going to OTC briefly.



    I agree, but my surgery was essentially a complete failure. One of the top guys here in NYC (was ortho for the Nets--actually, maybe that means he wasn't a top guy...) at an ortho specific hospital and my shoulder was exactly the same after surgery as before. I don't know why--he showed me the photos when I had a follow-up (I could see everything nicely tied/stapled down) and he was pleased, but after about 6 (maybe 8) weeks of PT, when we started doing throwing stuff, I began to wonder why my shoulder didn't seem to be any better (this was light tossing stuff, but I was still able to tell). Went back to the ortho to tell him and he prescribed extra PT which I did to no effect (total was probably almost 20 weeks of PT, in addition to what I did prior to surgery). I've basically given up on my shoulder as it (almost) only affects me when I'm throwing a baseball/softball, which I don't do much anymore. Strangely I can still serve in tennis at 95% with virtually no pain, but if I try to throw a baseball from second to first (90 feet) I might bounce it and it feels like someone is ramming an ice pick into my shoulder. Every now and then while skiing bumps if I have to pole plant in a way that pulls my hand up to head level it hurts, but I can ski and play hockey without ever noticing the shoulder, basically. So I guess I'm just going to leave it.

    Obviously my experience doesn't mean anything for anyone else, but going into this I had no idea about the failure rate--I (stupidly) assumed it would be like knee surgery, which has always worked perfectly for me.
    Regarding the pain, im pretty good with acute pain (history of playing/skiing/mtbing through fractures and tears) and the first week after my shoulder surgery was absolute misery. But then again, my boss had his cuff and labrum done last year and was back in the office advil-only on Day 3... so i think its like many other surgeries where its super individual. None of my other surgeries (admitedly minor in comparison) were even remotely close to the pain and misery level.

    the guy who did my shoulder did all the elbow and shoulder consults/surgeries for the SF giants... didnt seem to help me haha.

    One of the orthos who recently declined to do surgery on my shoulder said he thought that my advanced level of arthritis was mostly to blame for the pain, as well as the feelings of instability. More so than the labrum tears. And if you were a throwing athlete, you 100% have some level of arthritis, so maybe that is the crux of your issue? Cant really do anything about arthritis though, except manage the pain and prolong what cartilage you have left.

  17. #42
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    I guess my referral notes from ortho PA to the PT say suspected anterior labrum tear which is the most common type?

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    One of the orthos who recently declined to do surgery on my shoulder said he thought that my advanced level of arthritis was mostly to blame for the pain, as well as the feelings of instability. More so than the labrum tears. And if you were a throwing athlete, you 100% have some level of arthritis, so maybe that is the crux of your issue? Cant really do anything about arthritis though, except manage the pain and prolong what cartilage you have left.
    Right, and yeah, many years of competitive tennis and (probably fortunately) fewer years of baseball I assume are to blame (although I believe my non-dominant shoulder is also a little messed up, but since I don't throw/serve with it it doesn't ever really manifest), but the word arthritis never came up (at least not that I remember, and I think I would). I've considered many times going back and seeing about another surgery, but given how rarely I throw these days it seems hard to justify--although not being able to do that simple thing that I was always able to do is frustrating. And since I can still serve in tennis at nearly 100% and all everyday activities are unaffected...well, I just don't know if it even makes sense to go back to the ortho.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    I guess my referral notes from ortho PA to the PT say suspected anterior labrum tear which is the most common type?
    SLAP tear, yeah, could be the most common--but I didn't even stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night, so not certain. FWIW that's what I had along with whatever the rotator cuff tear was (is).

    Hope these surgeries work out for you guys, I'm just not sure about failure rates and what really determines whether or not the surgeries are successful. Like I said, my doc seemed very happy with the repairs he'd made but my shoulder is functionally exactly the same as it was pre-surgery. Never got better at all.
    [quote][//quote]

  19. #44
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    Ughh, two weeks out and the pain is pretty much the same. Specifically in the front of the shoulder/outside of the upper arm. As the numbness wears off the pain increases, so maybe the axillary nerve is waking back up?

    PT is keeping it moving but really painful. Still cant really lift my arm much, especially out to the side. Fucking can't wait for this MRI tomorrow. Hopefully dont have to wait another week for doc to read the images.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    Ughh, two weeks out and the pain is pretty much the same. Specifically in the front of the shoulder/outside of the upper arm. As the numbness wears off the pain increases, so maybe the axillary nerve is waking back up?

    PT is keeping it moving but really painful. Still cant really lift my arm much, especially out to the side. Fucking can't wait for this MRI tomorrow. Hopefully dont have to wait another week for doc to read the images.
    Good luck WRG. Sending good vibes your way.

    Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk

  21. #46
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    my $0.02, be the squeaky wheel if you want timely service from medical professionals. this is coming from experience as well as being told to do this by various doctors over the years. Give it a day and then call the MRI place as well as your Ortho's office asking when to expect results and when to schedule the follow up appt. Dont ever forget YOU are the client, and THEY are trying to get or keep your business. Don't ever be rude, but also don't lose sight of that dynamic.

    Can vibes on the pain. Its incredibly frustrating and taxing on the body and mind to be in chronic serious pain. Anything you can do (within reason) to reduce the pain will speed up your healing.

  22. #47
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    Waiting two weeks for a MRI? When did Canada annex Montana?


  23. #48
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    in Canada it would be 2 months
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  24. #49
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    Twelve yrs (?) ago I fucked up my left shoulder - only 25% of supraspinatus was still attached and a grade 2 SLAP tear.

    Took like three weeks to get an MRI at OHSU in PDX. That was misery - in that tunnel for like an hour (I’m claustrophobic) laying on my bad shoulder. I became convinced that this was a test for how badly I wanted the surgery.

    Surgery went fine except the pain med pump they put in my shoulder leaked like a sieve- finally pulled it out after two days (there was waaayyy more tube than I expected when I started pulling)

    Spent a week after surgery in a recliner, leaving only to use the toilet. Pain was tolerable with opioids and cannabis - at one point though I remember wondering why I couldn’t change the TV’s channel from my laptop touchpad…

    I rewrote our Company’s website content in the first 10 days after surgery. Surprisingly everyone thought it was pretty good!

    Rehab wasn’t fun but wasn’t as bad as my Achilles rupture. I was back on my MTB six mos after surgery. That said I had a couple of setbacks because, as my PT noted “TBS is an overachiever in rehab”. Take it easy, do as much as they tell you, but more reps/intensity beyond that isn’t helpful.

    Best of luck. You will get through this

    ETA - it took the same amount of time (3 weeks) for my Canadian business partner to get an MRI on his knee

  25. #50
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    I'm not a big fan of opiates but realize I will have to do at least a few days if I get surgery. Does CBD work for this kind of pain at all? I am weird and have steered clear of all CBD shit since I quit smoking weed 11 years ago and there really is no regulation still on which CBD things may or may not have THC in them even in small amounts....

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