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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    105

    overpacking risk ("just in case")?

    i'd say this forum is responsible of most of my expenses lately....ever happened to you that you have too many choices (midlayers/shells/tools/etc) and risk is that since you dont know what to bring with you, then you might bring everything with you even though most likely they will not get used on the trip?
    I am right there now, with too many midlayers/shells/etc and different type (R1, R2, Proton, mAcropuff, Alpine Start, Gamma LT, etc), and i am wasting time trying to decide which midlayer would be best for the next split adventure and thinking that in case that unlikely blizzard hits my trail, then better to have both the Proton and R2 with me, how silly.
    I guess experience, weather forecast, your sweat/cold tolerance will determine the final choice, however wondering how do you cope with this excess of choice? i know, first world problem... Also, when it was decided that fleece were not good enough and then Proton/Nano were introduced?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    at work
    Posts
    1,199
    #firstworldproblems
    "What moves men of genius, or rather what inspires their work, is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough."

    -Eugene Delacroix

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    1,109
    You should buy some of my crap so that I can stop having to make the same decisions.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    26,601
    My buddy zee guide had a group from a hi-end chic-chi clothing mfger( forget the brand ) bring bales of the stuff on a trip, they asked what to wear for the conditions that AM

    he replied " I don't know, I only have one "
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    9
    I have kept my touring kit simple deliberately so I never have to choose. I always wear and bring the same stuff, even if it's overkill, with the exception of avy gear, crampons, extra mid layer below 20 deg, and how many spare gloves and goggles. I have 1 pair of skis. If you pick good gear it'll cover a range of conditions and objectives, and you'll save time agonizing over what jackets to bring at 12am when you should be sleeping already.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    2,459
    Get a smaller pack. If you have extra space you’ll always fill it with shit you won’t end up using


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Quote Originally Posted by other grskier View Post
    well, in the three years i've been skiing i bet i can ski most anything those 'pro's' i listed can, probably

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    307
    I like having complete kits with a purpose. I have three: “resort” “cold touring” and “warm/high output touring”. Each kit contains similar elements (shell,insulating layer, wind layer, corresponding shell or softshell pant). I live in Oregon where it might be warm and sunny, warm and wet, cold and sunny, or cold and snowy. By putting together kits for specific conditions, I think about how the pieces work together and usually be pretty comfortable.

    I’m not suggesting anyone go out and buy three kits. But if you have a lot of layers already, thinking about them in terms of systems rather than individual pieces can help with deciding what kit to bring.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    307

    overpacking risk ("just in case")?

    Double post deleted.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by Samski360 View Post
    I like having complete kits with a purpose. I have three: “resort” “cold touring” and “warm/high output touring”. Each kit contains similar elements (shell,insulating layer, wind layer, corresponding shell or softshell pant). I live in Oregon where it might be warm and sunny, warm and wet, cold and sunny, or cold and snowy. By putting together kits for specific conditions, I think about how the pieces work together and usually be pretty comfortable.

    I’m not suggesting anyone go out and buy three kits. But if you have a lot of layers already, thinking about them in terms of systems rather than individual pieces can help with deciding what kit to bring.
    this is the way. don't overthink it.
    same shell all season long.
    two bibs (one beefy for cold/stormy, one for spring tours).
    a couple wool base layers to adapt to temps.
    same puffy(arcteryx nuclei FL is my current favorite, it lives in my touring pack).
    one fleece midlayer for chilly days(NF summit fleece hoody).
    one superlight windshell(BD deploy; thing packs to less than half the size of a 12oz can).
    gloves: one liner for skinning (kept as dry as possible), one ski glove for descents, a overmitt (only if its super cold/i anticipate hands touching snow frequently) and a pair of rubber insulated gloves for emergencies ie. digging out a burial or if the ski gloves wet through.
    works 100% of the days in the sierra.

    i'm a sweaty boy though so i don't need much. the colder you are the more you'll need.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    6,620
    Layers are good. One shell one bib. Mittens work in all conditions


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I need to go to Utah.
    Utah?
    Yeah, Utah. It's wedged in between Wyoming and Nevada. You've seen pictures of it, right?

    So after 15 years we finally made it to Utah.....


    Thanks BCSAR and POWMOW Ski Patrol for rescues

    8, 17, 13, 18, 16, 18, 20, 19, 16, 24, 32, 35

    2021/2022 (13/15)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    444
    I think you should try to get to the point where most of the time you dress appropriately. Have confidence in that, and then for the times when you don't dress appropriately, protect against the worse downside (in winter, being too cold).

    I wear what I think I'll need all day and pack a very small & light wind jacket (OR Helium II). I also bring very warm emergency gear on every tour. I'm generally unlikely to be too hot - it's not going to be 45* in January. And if I'm way underdressed, I can switch to my beanie and big mittens and oversized down jacket and it won't be the end of the world. But most of the time, I don't take anything off or put anything on all day, and I bet you can get there too.

    There are definitely times when I'm too hot. For example, this past Saturday we mostly ski toured in north-facing drainages (i.e. ridge on our south) and I dressed for the weather in the drainage. But part of our tour required skinning in the sun on the ridge, and I was super hot. Oh well - I was hot and sweaty for 30-40 minutes and that kind of sucked, but ultimately I felt like I dressed appropriately for the wide variety of conditions we encountered. I would not have wanted to, e.g., pack a sunshirt to change into for the 30 mins we were in the sun.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    19,859
    For resort trips I can be get by with a mid-weight baselayer, light and midweight midlayers, nanopuff, non insulated shell jacket and pants. and fleece pants which I can also wear in the hotel, to dinner, etc. I've used that packing list from 50F to --40. (OK, the --40 was windchill but it was below 0F.)

    If you're too hot half the time and too cold half the time you're doing it right.

    Obviously the stakes are higher on a touring trip, esp multiday.

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