Page 1 of 16 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 393

Thread: Wildfire 2022

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    14,499

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    the rock SE IDAHO
    Posts
    259
    Well we are starting out I think moving in a better direction for fed fire. Attempting to build a fire job series (fs/blm/bus/fws)
    Rumors of a pay raise and other promises to be determined. Snow pack in south Idaho is Currently good to average with plenty of time left to improve we hope.
    Really thought about the fire folks/ folks that lost homes over near boulder. Poor local ict 3 had to suffer that bastard out. Pretty sure no teams around between x mas and New Years. Hoping for a solid winter and safe fire season for all. Hope you all skiing your brains out now.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Posts
    897
    https://wildfiretoday.com/2022/02/18...g-communities/

    “ The study, which looked at more than 22,000 fires, found that those crossing jurisdictional boundaries are primarily caused by people on private property. It also showed that ignitions on Forest Service lands accounted for fewer than 25% of the most destructive wildfires – ones that resulted in the loss of more than 50 structures.

    “In the old framing, public agencies bear the primary responsibility for managing and mitigating cross-boundary fire risk and protecting our communities, with their efforts focused on prevention, fuel reduction and suppression,” Dunn said. “This has been the dominant management approach of years past, which is failing us.”

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    People's Republic of OB
    Posts
    3,333
    The Airport fire up by Bishop is around 4,000 acres. It was 20% contained yesterday. Haven't seen a report from today.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    20,985
    UFS study suggests removing up to 80%f of trees in Sierra forests.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...study-suggests
    Needless to say others disagree

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    YetiMan
    Posts
    13,377
    I got called off of skiing to go deal with some stupid February fire in Yuma once.

    I’ll say this: I was not stoked.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    People's Republic of OB
    Posts
    3,333
    Forest Service and CA Fish & Wildlife brought in Marines to demo some CCC era rock dams using explosives and went ahead with it yesterday on an 80*, windy day with reportedly no fire suppression equipment onsite.

    Brilliant. The resulting Jim Fire in Orange County is now 550 acres, 15% contained. It is burning one of the remaining areas that didn't burn in the 2018 fire.

    https://www.desertsun.com/story/news...ze/9354139002/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    20,985
    Nice little write-up about the Caldor Fire. Nothing earth shaking.
    https://www.moonshineink.com/tahoe-n...iefing-caldor/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    14,499
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    Nice little write-up about the Caldor Fire. Nothing earth shaking.
    https://www.moonshineink.com/tahoe-n...iefing-caldor/
    Good article. Bottom line;
    ”We lost the war on wildfire; it’s over. Fire won.”
    Tons more good quotes in it, too many to list.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    2 hours from anything
    Posts
    10,098
    I think viewing it as a war; fire = bad is why we lost. What we really need is more fire earlier in the season. Today I saw CalFire posting about a 7 acre burn. 7 fucking acres. They should be talking about 70,000 acre burns.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8,123
    7 Acres?!? Sounds like a grow.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,787
    Quote Originally Posted by neufox47 View Post
    I think viewing it as a war; fire = bad is why we lost. What we really need is more fire earlier in the season. Today I saw CalFire posting about a 7 acre burn. 7 fucking acres. They should be talking about 70,000 acre burns.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I agree, there needs to be a lot more low severity burns.

    There’s been a lot of criticism about the rx burn skills of Calfire and USFS. They have some well trained staff and (apparently) many that don’t understand or have the training to perform successful low intensity rx broadcast burns. It’s a known resource/training problem.

    There have been calfire burns where one unit was prepped and lit by a well trained low severity rx fire boss and an adjacent unit by one not well trained but given the authority to direct preparation and put the fire on the ground. The former’s unit met the objective of low severity fire w/o tree scorching or mortality, while the adjacent unit had the same goal but all trees under 30’ were severely scorched or killed. There was a calfire rx broadcast burn near foresthill last spring in a pondo pinr grove with a low severity surface fuel burn goal where they ended up with 100% mortality of all pondo pines.

    There needs to millions of acres treated. It needs to be more than Calfire and USFS. Surface fuels need to go just about everywhere. Burning should be occurring during the entire wet season. There are more and more prescribed burn associations teaching and supporting private property owners burning their properties to reduce the hazards and improve the qualities of the “forests.” People need to learn and start safely burning in their “backyards.” A little bit at a time.

    Also, 100-hr and 1000-hr fuels in the western Sierra are at a moisture level commensurate to the July averages, which is really bad!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_7804.jpg 
Views:	72 
Size:	1.09 MB 
ID:	409944
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_7765.jpg 
Views:	67 
Size:	1.71 MB 
ID:	409945

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow Skipper View Post
    Good article. Bottom line;

    ”We lost the war on wildfire; it’s over. Fire won.”

    Tons more good quotes in it, too many to list.
    I think many people could have told them that at least 10 years ago.

    The ecosystem is out of balance and nature is fixing it.

    People building in the WUI and beyond is analogous to building in the flood plain.

    USFS needs to let more of these big fires burn off big tracts of ground under good conditions because there is zero chance they are going to treat the fuels in any appreciable way before it burn.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,787
    Quote Originally Posted by oldnew_guy View Post
    I think many people could have told them that at least 10 years ago.

    The ecosystem is out of balance and nature is fixing it.

    People building in the WUI and beyond is analogous to building in the flood plain.

    USFS needs to let more of these big fires burn off big tracts of ground under good conditions because there is zero chance they are going to treat the fuels in any appreciable way before it burn.
    There’s a compelling argument that building in the WUI would be less problematic if the “forests” were better managed. This is the rhetoric of the rx burning people. Ive heard this stated at high levels by those planning and designing landscape level fuels management in the WUI. The floodplain analogy falls apart at that time.

    With the USFS allowing catastrophic fires to burn, there’s need for better post fire management, especially in the long terms. Overplanting or allowing habitat conversion is a problem.

    It’s amazing and sad reading about the loss of sequoia’s over the past 3 years.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,131
    Seems like everyone understands that decades of wildfires suppression put us in this situation, yet every fire all you here about is the % containment and how many acres of growth that day.

    You don’t hear anybody say this fire was needed and will have a positive impact on the environment, we’re going to let it burn for a while.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
    There’s a compelling argument that building in the WUI would be less problematic if the “forests” were better managed. This is the rhetoric of the rx burning people. Ive heard this stated at high levels by those planning and designing landscape level fuels management in the WUI. The floodplain analogy falls apart at that time.

    With the USFS allowing catastrophic fires to burn, there’s need for better post fire management, especially in the long terms. Overplanting or allowing habitat conversion is a problem.

    It’s amazing and sad reading about the loss of sequoia’s over the past 3 years.
    This seems a little like wishful thinking to me. We have what we have. Landscape level fuels treatments are not going to happen overnight, if at all. At best we can shore up our WUI buffers. The amount of money, equipment and people required to do this work is mind boggling when you sit down and think about it.

    Nature is taking over. Sure, keep trying to manage it, but realistically the idea that if we throw more money and people at suppression or even fuels treatment that we can somehow not have these large fires is crazy. There has to be a large scale shift in how fire is managed, even if we get the landscape back to a “normal” fire return interval. In order to maintain that future fuels regime state I think we will have to let low intensity natural starts burn across the landscape all season. Is the public ready for that?

    Climate change is shifting the habitat range and length and timing of fire season. Long term drought is in play and shows no signs of going away.

    I’m probably just cynical because I was on the proverbial pointy end of the suppression spear and subsequently watched large fires burn over all of the years of suppression work under conditions where no one could do anything.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    11,852
    Quote Originally Posted by Skistack View Post
    Seems like everyone understands that decades of wildfires suppression put us in this situation, yet every fire all you here about is the % containment and how many acres of growth that day.

    You don’t hear anybody say this fire was needed and will have a positive impact on the environment, we’re going to let it burn for a while.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I agree with this to a point. I think the media coverage of the day to day is about the sensation... and the impacts these fires are having on people and towns.... which is about containment at that point. The big fire north of Junction 2 years ago they let burn out in a lot of areas to get rid of fuels... I can probably find a few more. But then you have situations like the Cali fires that burn through whole towns, that's a different conversation
    www.dpsskis.com
    www.point6.com
    formerly an ambassador for a few others, but the ski industry is... interesting.
    Fukt: a very small amount of snow.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,787
    Quote Originally Posted by oldnew_guy View Post
    This seems a little like wishful thinking to me. We have what we have. Landscape level fuels treatments are not going to happen overnight, if at all. At best we can shore up our WUI buffers. The amount of money, equipment and people required to do this work is mind boggling when you sit down and think about it.

    Nature is taking over. Sure, keep trying to manage it, but realistically the idea that if we throw more money and people at suppression or even fuels treatment that we can somehow not have these large fires is crazy. There has to be a large scale shift in how fire is managed, even if we get the landscape back to a “normal” fire return interval. In order to maintain that future fuels regime state I think we will have to let low intensity natural starts burn across the landscape all season. Is the public ready for that?

    Climate change is shifting the habitat range and length and timing of fire season. Long term drought is in play and shows no signs of going away.

    I’m probably just cynical because I was on the proverbial pointy end of the suppression spear and subsequently watched large fires burn over all of the years of suppression work under conditions where no one could do anything.
    I don’t necessarily disagree, but what are the alternatives? After 260+ years of rx fire suppression (I just learned about this) and 100 years of all fire suppression, at least in CA, it’s going to take a while to readjust the baseline and readjust the norm of what it means to live in the west.

    There’s a lot of $$ being thrown at it, big business, at least in the Bay Area, are paying attention and leveraging their influences, and there’s growing private, state, and federal $$ being thrown at it and more being proposed.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    14,499

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    8,750'
    Posts
    394
    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow Skipper View Post
    We had to evacuate from the #NCARfire at 3:00 yesterday, barely unpacked from spring break. Received multiple notifications to leave so the system is working (as opposed to the recent #MarshallFire. At 1030 pm or so last night, received the clear to come home but we are still very close to the line.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    8,750'
    Posts
    394
    Ugh!

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,787

    Wildfire 2022

    Glad the recent Boulder fire wasn’t too bad. I read that it may have done some good in the end in terms of fuels reduction. I’ve been digging a bit into the Marshall fire a bit. I had no idea of the potential that abandoned coal mines could have spontaneous combustion underground. The sheriff hasn’t determined if that was the cause, but apparently it’s one ignition source under consideration.

    This was a pretty good piece on rx fire (NorCal focused)
    https://youtu.be/7tVtQHzASzA

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    14,499
    Four major fires in New Mexico, driven by 30-40-50 mph winds and very dry condions.
    https://nmfireinfo.com/

    Evacuations on all of them. Might be a long fire season.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    entrapped
    Posts
    1,797
    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow Skipper View Post
    Four major fires in New Mexico, driven by 30-40-50 mph winds and very dry condions.
    https://nmfireinfo.com/

    Evacuations on all of them. Might be a long fire season.
    Already? .

    Wildfires are literally the only thing I don't miss about new mex.

    Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
    No matter where you go, there you are. - BB

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,360
    My mom is under evac for the fire in Ruidoso, she just texted me a little while ago. 15,000 acres gone in under 3 hours. We've talked about this for years, losing their home. It doesn't snow there anymore like it used to. At least they are prepared but reality is sinking in. The only thing that will save their home is if the winds take a more easterly trajectory as opposed to N/NE. 70mph sustained with gusts up to 90.

    I don't think I'll sleep tonight.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •