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  1. #1
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    Jan 2020
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    DUIS and the Canuckistan border

    Well, for quite obvious reasons, I would like to be able to cross the border. I was a trouble maker and have a record. Long story short, three states, three problems. Everything is all cleaned up, including myself, but my last hurdle to navigate is the border. I started researching, and found that in Canada the laws changed in 2018 and a DUI is viewed as a far heavier charge then in the states. There used to be a 7 year waiting window, now if a person has had a DUI more after 2010 or so a special process is needed or so they say. They also want $3800 for this process, which includes applying to the consulate, interviews, letters of recommendation, and FBI and state back ground checks.

    So, is this true? Or is there another way? I fucked up for sure, and I understand having to pay the price and fix what I have done, so if there isnt another way, well then so be it, but there are some red flags waving at the same time, but getting someone that actually gives you answers in the Canadian government is pretty close to impossible.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    17,147
    Seems prudent to hire a Canadian lawyer to get it fully sorted, no?
    Is it radix panax notoginseng? - splat

  3. #3
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    Jun 2020
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    in a freezer in Italy
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    As far as I'm aware, you're gonna be out of luck. They definitely do take DUIs more seriously than we do here.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MakersTeleMark View Post
    Seems prudent to hire a Canadian lawyer to get it fully sorted, no?
    A case of Molson should cover that.

  5. #5
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    Feb 2009
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    2010 you say? Guess I can stop worrying and putting my wife behind the wheel when we cross. IME The CBP aren't looking for that at the border and worst case is they turn you around. Having an accident on Canadian soil might be another story. My neph went the "buy your way out" route. So ask a lawyer or do you feel lucky today.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2005
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    Fresh Lake City
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoVT Joey View Post
    Well, for quite obvious reasons, I would like to be able to cross the border. I was a trouble maker and have a record. Long story short, three states, three problems. Everything is all cleaned up, including myself, but my last hurdle to navigate is the border. I started researching, and found that in Canada the laws changed in 2018 and a DUI is viewed as a far heavier charge then in the states. There used to be a 7 year waiting window, now if a person has had a DUI more after 2010 or so a special process is needed or so they say. They also want $3800 for this process, which includes applying to the consulate, interviews, letters of recommendation, and FBI and state back ground checks.

    So, is this true? Or is there another way? I fucked up for sure, and I understand having to pay the price and fix what I have done, so if there isnt another way, well then so be it, but there are some red flags waving at the same time, but getting someone that actually gives you answers in the Canadian government is pretty close to impossible.
    Yes it is true. You have to apply for criminal rehabilitation. If you Google it, you'll get hits from canada.ca on the first page which will have all the info you need and a ton of lawyers offering to help you do it.

    Yes there is a lot of paperwork to gather and submit including an FBI background check and background check from every state I lived in after the age of 18. But other than being a PIA to get all the paperwork in order I didn't find it hard and it definitely didn't cost me $3800. But my rehabilitation was approved in 2014 or 2015. A quick glance looks like its the same process as back then as now, but I didn't look too hard. I do remember the turnaround time after the paperwork was submitted was much longer than they quoted me. I think it took 6 months, I applied in the fall with hopes of skiing in Canada that winter and wasn't approved until April.

    After the Canadian government deemed I was rehabilitated, I crossed the border twice before I got "popped." Of course at that point, I didn't think I had to carry the paperwork and there was no service at the border to pull it up in my email. Took about 1.5 hr before the border patrol magically found the paperwork that said I was rehabilitated, but he did warn me that I should carry it with me everytime I cross the border (which is sorta laughable since if they can see I have a DUI, they damn well can see I paid the pittance). At that time, it was only between the 5-10 year after the DUI that you needed to get rehabbed. Before 5 years, no Canada fir you and after 10 years, you could apply for rehabilitation (pay a fee) at the border.

    So yes, you can probably roll the dice and get across the border without jumping through the hoops. But chances are slimmer in the age of covid.

    There's also already a thread on this topic if you wanted to search

  7. #7
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    Greg_o
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    Politest gut punch I've seen.

  8. #8
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    May 2015
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    inw
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    Or you can rent Wooley's wife for an afternoon.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    1,114
    Quote Originally Posted by brutah View Post
    Yes it is true. You have to apply for criminal rehabilitation. If you Google it, you'll get hits from canada.ca on the first page which will have all the info you need and a ton of lawyers offering to help you do it.

    Yes there is a lot of paperwork to gather and submit including an FBI background check and background check from every state I lived in after the age of 18. But other than being a PIA to get all the paperwork in order I didn't find it hard and it definitely didn't cost me $3800. But my rehabilitation was approved in 2014 or 2015. A quick glance looks like its the same process as back then as now, but I didn't look too hard. I do remember the turnaround time after the paperwork was submitted was much longer than they quoted me. I think it took 6 months, I applied in the fall with hopes of skiing in Canada that winter and wasn't approved until April.

    After the Canadian government deemed I was rehabilitated, I crossed the border twice before I got "popped." Of course at that point, I didn't think I had to carry the paperwork and there was no service at the border to pull it up in my email. Took about 1.5 hr before the border patrol magically found the paperwork that said I was rehabilitated, but he did warn me that I should carry it with me everytime I cross the border (which is sorta laughable since if they can see I have a DUI, they damn well can see I paid the pittance). At that time, it was only between the 5-10 year after the DUI that you needed to get rehabbed. Before 5 years, no Canada fir you and after 10 years, you could apply for rehabilitation (pay a fee) at the border.

    So yes, you can probably roll the dice and get across the border without jumping through the hoops. But chances are slimmer in the age of covid.

    There's also already a thread on this topic if you wanted to search
    thats pretty much exactly what I have found. Costs have just gone up and the waiting period is 6-12 months at least. I have contacted a law firm, but I figured Id check with the collection considering, well Im definitely not the only one here that made bad choices. But thanks. That clears it up. I pretty much didnt want to get fucked by another lawyer, at least this one is chick and sounds like shes hot.

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