Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 188
  1. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    DownEast
    Posts
    2,117
    I feel you can get more bang for your buck with vintage gear. I can recommend older Klipsch speakers (Heresy/Forte/Chorus), Marantz receivers (2230/2270), and Polk speakers (Monitor 7 or 10).
    The internet is your friend for researching vintage gear.
    Find a wealthy neighborhood and check out yard sales. Seriously. Most people “upgrade” to newer, smaller gear that isn’t as good. Thanks Bose! Most stuff you can buy cheap and flip if you need to… at least that was the case 15 years ago when I put my gear together.

    For Bluetooth, I just use a Auris BluMe HD plugged into my Marantz. Mostly for convenience.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    5,012
    Quote Originally Posted by basinbeater View Post
    I have not heard that particular item, but, class D amp, I know they've come a long way in the past 10 years. But still. And, they cram a lot of stuff into a little box at an attractive price. There's got to be some pretty serious compromises along the way. Will it sound better than the black plastic crap? Most likely. Will it have the livelness and impact and dynamics of a higher end used set of separates? Probably not. But I haven't heard one.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using TGR Forums mobile app
    Thatís my setup.

    Somewhat nice Polk bookshelfs
    Little class D amp
    Cheaper audiotechnica record player
    Chromecast audio

    Sounds pretty fucking good for under like $700 totalÖ



    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    16,772
    Quote Originally Posted by basinbeater View Post
    The used b & k stuff strikes me as very high value. Hafler stuff is usually quite good as well.
    One watch out if you are looking at vintage gear, is worn/pitted potentiometers and switches. If possible test carefully at low listening levels.

    I do like to have more power from my amp available than the speakers may ever need. I want any movement of my speaker drivers to come effortlessly.
    Sent from my SM-G960U using TGR Forums mobile app
    I have a really great vintage audio repair place about 15 minutes from me, so you may want to look around for the service if needed to service any equipment with sticky dials or re-cone a less than new woofer bought sight unseen (like I did) off the internet.
    And for sure, get the most powerful amp you can for the speakers, as power at low volumes will give you a full sound even if not loud.
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    inw
    Posts
    1,224
    I went through a similar process 7 or 8 years ago and have some thoughts to share:

    1. Floorstanding vs. bookshelf:
    Your speaker of (initial) choice is bookshelf, so I assume you've made up your mind on form factor. You can get amazing sound from a smaller box. The tradeoff is bass and ability to fill a large room (displacement). If you go this route and classic rock is what you'll be playing you'll want a subwoofer. My suggestion there: get one with its own gain/volume (common) and, more importantly, a crossover control (less common). Any subwoofer of equivalent quality will work fine with bookshelf speakers, but not at factory crossover settings (the frequency where the smaller woofer hands off to the big boy woofer). If not set correctly it won't sound good. With that knob you can set the frequency manually as you listen or have someone else turn the knob slowly as you listen from a proper distance/location.

    If you go this bookshelf+SW route you do not need a bookshelf speaker that markets "deep bass" (which is pretty near impossible to achieve and definitely not worth paying for). You can stick with traditional designs that won't carry that marketing premium/BS.

    As I posted above, NHT (East Bay-ish in CA), makes amazing bookshelf speakers, specifically the C1 and C3. There are lots of good options, however. My suggestion would be to listen before buying....and buy used. Speakers are a bit like skis and then suddenly they are like boots. Once you find what works in your environment you can stop looking. So, if you get a pair of vintage KEFs that have great reviews and sounded good in that dude's garage but sound flat in your living room you can flip them easily and turn that cash around for a new pair of fill-in-the-blank.

    FWIW, I love my NHT Classic 2s but would go back to floorstanding Audio Physic if I had the space. The day I sold my Tempos was a sad day.

    2. Listening
    Depending on where you are (in SLC?) there may be a decent market in used, higher-end audio equipment. Get on craigslist and whatever forums folks mentioned above and get over to sellers who are willing to demo for you. And not on the tailgate of a truck, mind you--in vivo. You'll learn a lot and there's always a chance you meet someone who just loves to share knowledge (again, kinda like skis).

    When you are able to land an in-person demo I strongly recommend the following:
    - bring higher-fidelity digital copies of three things: "Hello Little Schoolgirl" off of Muddy Waters' Folk Singer (you'll immediately understand why once you put it on), "Rosanna" by Toto (I know...it's for the opening of the song, which will tell you a lot about the speakers), and one or three tracks of whatever you plan to listen to.
    - onsite set the expectation with the seller that you need to take your time and won't be rushed. Aural memory is stronger in some people than in others. Mine sucks so I need to listen a few times to really take an impression of how a track sounds on certain setups. Focus in on that aspect of the song you targeted to measure that aspect of the speaker's performance: e.g. you brought "The Ocean" to hear how they reproduce John Bonham's fucking brilliance.
    - read up on what to listen for without falling too deep in that particular rabbit hole and then go do it.
    - look at the equipment driving the speakers. If it's garbage or if it's reference, each will impact the sound you are hearing. In fact, every piece of equipment between the digits on the source media and the oscillating drivers will have an impact, so just be aware of the operating environment. Anecdote: Due to restrictions on the Spotify crossfade feature, I was listening to Spotify on my system the other day, switching back and forth from an audio Chromecast > optical cable > Topping D30 DAC > preamp to 8-yr old $12 bluetooth receiver > preamp and the difference in audio quality was vast.

    Finally, know the (local) market for that specific model and do not over pay. If you decide to flip them you don't want to lose $ or find they are hard to sell.

    ---

    This is already pretty long so I'll stop there. I have thoughts about buying vintage amps & preamps that partly echo what basinbeater wrote (among his pile of good advice) but I'll leave that for later.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Watching over the valley
    Posts
    4,095
    Another thought as if the collective hasn't put forth a million already, if you are thinking bookshelf speakers, but plan on using stands, the form factor may be similar in size to some towers. My signet bookshelf speakers with stands occupy more space the JBL towers. So again, more powerful amplifier gives you options.
    If you are planning on putting the bookshelf speakers on a bookshelf, then well, yeah.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20211130_194356.jpeg 
Views:	54 
Size:	59.0 KB 
ID:	395569

    Sent from my SM-G960U using TGR Forums mobile app
    sigless.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    16,772
    Basinbeater, are stands just for looks or do they add something. I have always had large floor standing speakers. Had some Cerwin Vega's back in the day with a 15" woofer mounted to fire down about 4" from the floor. Those got us evicted for noise complaints in an apartment. So ya, I am deaf and love big speakers.
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    4,571
    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    I like the looks of the integrated system, plus less wires.

    OP have you considered a vintage Yorx?

    Attachment 395551
    Have you considered the benefits of a fractional ownership of a vintage Yorx system?

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    637
    I have this discontinued 3.2 star beauty stabbed into my 1989 Kenwood rack system in my garage.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	dewalt.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	137.4 KB 
ID:	395577

    The speakers are gone, the "5 cd carousel" is gone, the cabinet is gone but the tape deck, eq and tuner live on!

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,230
    I had kinda settled on bookshelf speakers as I figured I could get higher quality units for the same money. Basically I'd rather get smaller but as high quality as my budget would allow. Seems to me that used floor speakers might be the way to go now.

    Notably with a 1 year old roaming around hell bent on destruction. I should know better than to entertain bookshelf speakers on stands but they do look cool IMO.
    Live Free or Die

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Watching over the valley
    Posts
    4,095
    For these signets, they need the stands to put the speakers at the right height and allow for positioning in the room.
    I also have a pair of Canton Karat bookshelf speakers, and they are much happier on stands than an actual shelf.
    The towers, with the larger cabinet volume and four way driver configuration have stronger tighter bass, cleaner natural mids and highs. They also require more power.
    Simple answer is, yes, stands are very necessary for my use of bookshelf speakers in the living room.


    Sent from my SM-G960U using TGR Forums mobile app
    sigless.

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Watching over the valley
    Posts
    4,095
    If you were in salt lake, these look tempting for $500. Kind of surprised they haven't sold actually...
    Mirage. Omd -15 https://classifieds.ksl.com/listing/65740177

    Sent from my SM-G960U using TGR Forums mobile app
    sigless.

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    4,571
    I think the advice here has been excellent. To add to it / tweak it, I'd say when spending the money on your amp and speakers, you don't have to go for big names. I one room I have that 80s Phillips tube amp mentioned below hooked to a pair of energy 2.1e speakers. Lots of audiophiles don't even know what those two things are. But the Phillips amp sounds fantastic for a 40w integrated amp. It was part of the Phillips Lab project and was only around for 3-4 years, but it's very nice stuff. Similarly, the original Canadian Energy brand made speakers in the 90s that I loved at a great pricepoint, and since they kinda went out of business / got bought by Klipsch no one really pays them any attention. So you could buy these two pieces for probably $500-600 and it would be as good as most $1,500 new amp/pre/speaker gear (if you like the sound, which I do - warm and resonant.)

    So point is, the used advice is good, but listening for yourself and doing some research - and not just limiting yourself to the stuff everyone lusts after - can have a big impact.

    But mostly, find some really kick ass speakers, as everyone here has said.

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    4,571
    Quote Originally Posted by exsparky View Post
    I have this discontinued 3.2 star beauty stabbed into my 1989 Kenwood rack system in my garage.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	dewalt.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	137.4 KB 
ID:	395577

    The speakers are gone, the "5 cd carousel" is gone, the cabinet is gone but the tape deck, eq and tuner live on!
    I like the chromecast audios. Also discontinued, right? I'm running three of them I think.

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    14,842
    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    Have you considered the benefits of a fractional ownership of a vintage Yorx system?
    That may be another downside of going integrated vs separates. You can't loan out or do fractional ownership of just the preamp portion because it's all sorta contained in one box.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    748
    Funny this thread popped up, I just picked up a pair of Cornwall Is from CL a few weeks ago and have been going down the internet audio nerd wormhole. (These are my first pair of quality speakers).

    They sound quite nice but now Iím tempted to upgrade my amp situation. (Iíve got an outlaw audio rr2160, also from CL, which I got since it is reputed to have a solid DAC and phono stage built in). Itís been a great all-in-one solution but Iím curious to find out what tinkering with different preamps/amps/DACs/phono stages would sound like. Plus thereís the cult of tubes with these klipsch heritage speakers.

    I also donít know shit about shit when it comes to audio, audio nerd internet is insane and I donít really have a way of listening to different stuff without committing money to it.

    Iím planning on keeping an eye on Craigslist and maybe picking up interesting pieces that seem like a good deal.

    Honestly all this stuff is overwhelming and thereís so much bullshit that itís hard to know what advice is good.

  16. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    14,842
    Quote Originally Posted by jorion View Post
    Honestly all this stuff is overwhelming and there’s so much bullshit that it’s hard to know what advice is good.
    Well either good news or bad news depending on your situation, but high end audio really is a load of shit...mostly. Outside of wine collecting, it may have the steepest slope on the law of diminishing returns graph.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    748
    Thatís what Iíve gathered even without hearing much. Iíve been aware of how much some people spend on audio gear for a long time but itís still pretty shocking to me.

  18. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    14,842
    I knew a sound engineer at the Hit Factory in NYC. One day I was in the recording studio and figured I'd ask him his opinion on some higher end audio equipment which I was looking to buy at the time. He pointed at some smallish studio monitors above the board and said, "Just buy these, I don't mix the sound for really expensive speakers."
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    seattle
    Posts
    687
    Unless you go with truly huge floor speakers I believe a sub always adds a ton to the sound quality. For music centric system check out sealed offerings from Rythmik, SVS, REL. 10” for medium space 12” for living room. Weight seems to be a decent indicator of quality.

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    portland, or
    Posts
    75
    If you don't already have a vinyl collection you might consider holding off on the turntable for now and putting the money towards other components in your setup. I enjoy my vinyl setup quite a bit, I've spent a decent bit of $ on it and I think I'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between my vinyl and digital sources in a blind comparison. If you don't have a vinyl collection on hand, most of your time will be spent listening to your digital source and spending more on speakers will result in more smiles than the turntable would.

  21. #71
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18,495
    I have a wireless JBL sub. I ran it wired at first thinking it would sound better that way. Itís doesnít. Wireless sound is better for this particular piece of equipment and gives more flexibility. Just something to keep in mind if you use smaller R/L bookshelves. Donít worry about wiring a sub.

  22. #72
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18,495

    Audiophiles, help me build a decent stereo

    Most music since the mid 80ís was digitally mastered so whether vinyl copies of a digital master sound better has to be subjective. Build your system to best accommodate your collection whether digital or analogue. While I like ďhifiĒ a lot convenience and access is far more important than aural quality for me.

    Also, consider whether your going to use video with the system . Stereo is a terrible substitute for digital surround.

    Think about your factory car audio system. Mine sounds far better in Dolby surround than in stereo but thatís unique to a car

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,230
    Interesting. How does the signal transmit to the sub?

    This setup wonít be utilized for video. I pretty much rarely watch stuff other than Top Gear streaming on a motortrend so I have some Dolby soundbar for that and itís good enough for my use there.

  24. #74
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    7,230
    Quote Originally Posted by doubleeject View Post
    If you don't already have a vinyl collection you might consider holding off on the turntable for now and putting the money towards other components in your setup. I enjoy my vinyl setup quite a bit, I've spent a decent bit of $ on it and I think I'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between my vinyl and digital sources in a blind comparison. If you don't have a vinyl collection on hand, most of your time will be spent listening to your digital source and spending more on speakers will result in more smiles than the turntable would.
    I think youíre probably right but Iím kinda looking for the whole tactile thing of the record experience as well. The sleeve, liner notes, pressing play, etc. Iíve built up quite a book collection that I just moved across the country to everyone that helped meís chagrin for similar reasons. That whole smell and feel of turning an actual page is so relaxing for me.

  25. #75
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    18,495
    Sub comes with a small transmitter box that plugs into the sub out port. Sub has built in receiver.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •