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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    1,954

    In bounds/Slackcountry first aid kit

    Id like to put together a compact, light first aid kit for slack/side country use where ski patrol or SAR are always less than an hour away (thinking the Alpental back bowls). Just stuff to stabilize a victim, and/or prevent things from getting worse in the immediate timeframe from injury to professional arrival. Ideas?

    Gauze pads + looped paracord for tourniquet to keep pressure on an open wound (not to tourniquet a limb), space blanket to keep victim warmer, etc. Just stuff to help temporarily deal with major injuries till the REAL help arrives.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    关你屁事
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    4,553
    What is your training level?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    2,147
    OR Helium Emergency Bivy - they dump these for big discounts every once in awhile
    Voile Straps

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    251
    SAM Splint

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    13,828
    Current CPR training, then think ABC (airway, breathing, circulation) - IOW stabilization and communication stuff. Bleeding control comes to mind.

    Splinting supplies might have possible use for minor fractures in slackcountry. Not so much inbounds. IMO etc.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Where the climate suits my clothes.
    Posts
    5,212
    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    What is your training level?
    Yes 100%.

    If you are feeling ready to deal with back/slack country emergencies get a WFA or WFR. The WFA is a relatively short course (I think 16 hrs?) That will thoroughly inform what you should bring in your kit.

    https://soloschools.com/training-information/

    (Coming from a Solo graduate with a WEMT)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Shuswap Highlands
    Posts
    3,435
    Good advice above. Especially the training.

    CPR mask. The NuMasks are nice and compact with built in OPA
    OLEAS or Israeli bandage.
    OTC pain meds (tylenol and ibuprofen)
    Shelter like a 2person bothy bag.

    Limb stabilization probably not needed if outside comms exists and help is under an hour. If expecting longer response or the subject needs to be moved then sam splint with ski straps is nice.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    North Worst
    Posts
    139
    Sam splint, triangle bandages, gauze, 4x4, Israeli dressings, a couple cat tourniquets, IO gun and needles to compliment.

    Go get some training if you haven’t, like many have said. WFA and WFR are awesome. Little did I know when I took WFR where it would take me. It’s a great class and you’ll meet some cool people.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1,895
    Space blanket and warm clothes do wonders

    Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    7,278
    I carry one of these in every pack: https://www.surviveoutdoorslonger.co...mal-bivvy.html




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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,892
    How's the OR vs the SOL bivvy?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2,147
    That one Zion linked has more functionality than the OR one I referenced. You can just fold up the SOL one into a rectangle and it slips into most packs easily and makes nice sit/kneel pad. I added a piece of foam for a sit pad to my kit last season and was able to score a deal on the OR during a sale. OR one is pretty much for one purpose only, emergencies. It's 30d fabric, so it can take repeated use, unlike the really thin mylar SOL ones.

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    348
    ++ on the shelter and warmth suggestions for waiting-for-help scenarios

    I carry a rolled up sheet of tyvek because it can be used as a tarp shelter for a couple people or a wrap for a single person. Burrito/envelope style seems gentler than trying to insert some injuries into a bivvy tube. But I'm not convinced that my strategy is correct, and it is bulkier than either of the others shared here.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    2,757
    +1 on the Sol bivy that ZZZ linked. I carry the two person version of that one, to share body warmth and because it's easier to manuever someone into.

    Whatever your wound management strategy is, I would add QuikClot. Same weight as a gauze 4x4" but much more effective:

    https://www.rei.com/product/182821/a...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

    Add a big ass puffy to that, some hand warmers, and a nip of whiskey, and I reckon you're good to go. I mean - as good as it gets.

    Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine Coast
    Posts
    3,532
    I thought medical folks hate quickclot because it’s a mess to deal with after. Also my training was that pressure and elevation solved most problems or a tourniquet if those didn’t and if neither of those worked you were in deep poo. My most recent wfa instructor (former British special forces, massive SAR experience) said quickclot was a battlefield treatment.

    Always good to be told I am wrong and get my knowledge straight

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,744
    I believe a lot of the opposition to Quikclot is the old version that was loose granules that would be poured into the wound and would require cleaning the wound out later. But I'm a dentist not a wound care doctor so could be entirely full of shit.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    2,757
    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    I believe a lot of the opposition to Quikclot is the old version that was loose granules that would be poured into the wound and would require cleaning the wound out later. But I'm a dentist not a wound care doctor so could be entirely full of shit.
    +1, yep. That's my understanding. The new bandage formula is just a 4x4 or whatever that you pack into the wound

    Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Emerald City
    Posts
    217
    Just did my WFA a few weeks ago, and while they recommend some additional customizations (splints, more wraps, etc), Adventure Medical Kits were the kit of choice.

    https://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Posts
    13,828
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueBison View Post
    ...IO gun and needles to compliment...

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Warm parts of the St. Vrain
    Posts
    2,183

    In bounds/Slackcountry first aid kit

    Quote Originally Posted by eSock View Post
    Just did my WFA a few weeks ago, and while they recommend some additional customizations (splints, more wraps, etc), Adventure Medical Kits were the kit of choice.

    https://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/
    Interesting, I was gonna mention before a couple of points not specifically related to slackcountry touring and might not fit the needs I dunno at all but anyway…

    I randomly bought the number 3 kit from them at REI because most of the stuff is consumable and redundant household stuff you will still be able to use at the house if you choose to lighter/customize the kit and I liked the very simple bag. So Im not paying for stuff (carrying) I don’t know how to use and the bag itself is light. Before, I just put my stuff in a regular ziplock, but the ziplock style bag of the #3 is pretty durable and very light (didn’t weigh it but anticipate under 1g.

    An additional advantage over the regular ziplock is that because of the labeling it can easily be identified by someone else if you ask them to grab it for you. You could put tape or stickers on a regular ziplock or jerkey bag but that brings me back to the original point that the cool bag comes with free “first aid” stuff. Again though, might be not so useful for touring like maybe too small or not organized enough… anyway…


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  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,954
    FWIW all I have is basic CPR training.
    Realistically, never gonna do a WFR, but will be taking a WFA in the couple years.

    So far a Numask CPR system, Israeli bandage, and space blanket seem like the best and most likely to be NEEDED in an inbounds-ish/slack country setting.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    7,362
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    Realistically, never gonna do a WFR, but will be taking a WFA in the couple years.
    That's a shame. My friends and I have used our WFR knowledge on many occasions. Now that most schools are offering hybrid online/in-person courses, it's a lot more realistic for working people to take one. I needed 3 vacation days to do mine.

    Still, highly recommend at least WFA for pretty much anyone that recreates in the backcountry, and recommend that you take it yesterday. You learn an incredible amount in those two days.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    2,048
    Basic First Aid PPE. gloves, CPR mask, hand sanitizer, face mask. You need to protect yourself.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2,147
    The real question is, will all this stuff fit into your sidecountry vest?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Zurich, Switzerland
    Posts
    5,732
    Quickclot and the like is more for deep puncture wounds you find in the battlefield. You won't find much use for that stuff in the backcountry or sidecountry. WFA class heavily discouraged them because pressure and elevation should cover your needs. Just lots of dressing. Add two extra heavy tampons to deal with broken noses. Pads work too as wound dressing. Gloves, cpr stuff snd something you can make a splint out of is good too (you can improvise this from your gear sometimes).

    Agree that WFA should be taken yesterday.

    Probably not worth taking a bivy for closetohome trips if everyone in your crew always brings a good insulation layer.

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