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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    85

    baselayer: replacing old stinky Capilene

    hi
    have a couple of old midzip Patagonia Capilene, which served me very well during the years. These are the old model, with no smell prevention technology. Bottom line, after half day they stink as hell.
    I also have a capilene Air hoody, which is truly awesome but so warm that it is excessive.

    These are the options i am considering:

    - still patagonia Capilene midweight, trusting that the new models will not be as stinky (HeiQ Fresh they call it...)

    - move to 100% wool. I have 2 Smartwool crew long sleeve (one should be 195 and the other 150, but this has some polyester i guess). I never used those for skiing, and the only time i went running with the 195 i remember i found it soaked, so i became a bit suspicious of wool for high intense activities

    - mix wool/synthetic. I see that now Smartwool makes a 200 Intraknit which is 53% Merino Wool, 44% Polyester, 3% Elastane

    what would you suggest? any other recommendation is highly appreciated.
    thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    1,757
    Fuck poly if youíre not sleeping in a tent.

    Wool wins for all real life applications.

    Poly wins when you need to wake up dry and then go.

    Thatís it.


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Pure merino like ibex, minus 33 or smart wool. Wash in wool wash delicate and lay flat to dry. Can wear many days between washing


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    I need to go to Utah.
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    So after 15 years we finally made it to Utah.....


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  4. #4
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    Nov 2008
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    baselayer: replacing old stinky Capilene

    I use merino base layers when riding lifts, but I sweat a lot in the skin track and wool doesnít dry as quickly as plastic.

    On days when itís not snowing, a sport t-shirt under a FS Bross is great for skinning. If I get a little cold, the hills comes on. A little hot and pull the hood off.

    If I have to wear a shell, I just slow way down to manage the sweat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Vinyl Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by whyturn View Post
    Pure merino like ibex, minus 33 or smart wool. Wash in wool wash delicate and lay flat to dry. Can wear many days between washing


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    This guy^^^ knows the good wool brands. There are a couple more Scandi/Euro manufacturers

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    85
    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    I use merino base layers when riding lifts, but I sweat a lot in the skin track and wool doesnít dry as quickly as plastic.
    that's exactly my fear why i havent yet pulled the trigger on 100% wool for sweating activities. Would a blend wool/synthetic solve the issue?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    7B Idaho
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    I have a very different experience to the posters above I guess. I find the new capilene (and a lot of Polartec fabrics) with odor prevention is awesome and I can use for multiple big cardio activities/days before washing. The durability of wool is so massively inferior to poly and a quality wool shirt is more expensive to start. They get soaked and then take way longer to dry especially under a backpack. But they do feel better against the skin and I do use sometimes use a wool T shirt for multi-day adventures. But mostly I have a rotation of ~8 older tech synthetic T shirts that I use as my next to skin layer; they do stink after a surprisingly short amount of use, but I only use them 1 day before washing (since I wash all synthetics together as a batch of laundry, I prob wash them all monthly). The Patagonia Polygiene treatment they used to use just a few years ago works amazingly well to prevent stink, I can run 3-4 times in a shirt before it really starts to stink! The old ones stink after a single short run.

    I recommend trying a synthetic first like the new capilene. Consider using a short sleeve T shirt as you next to skin layer as they are inexpensive and versatile. You can layer a thin 1/4 zip over the top if you like and it won't pick up near the amount of stink with the T under it.

    Keep a fresh clean cotton T in the car for when you get back and change for the drive home (this is amazingly satisfying).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    85
    thanks a lot SkisTheTrees.
    My experience with Patagonia Capilene has been so positive that I am really keen to try the new ones.

    It's not the first time i hear about a running shirt under the base layer (and I have also seen people wearing ABOVE the first layer), and to be honest I am still very reluctant to try.

    In the car i keep some heavy Smartwool long sleeve shirt, to stay nice and toasty once back, way better than cotton.

    any experience with blended material (wool/poly)? i am looking at some nice Ortovox or Odlo first layer, and wool is 53%

  9. #9
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    Sep 2008
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    those ortovox base layers are pretty good. i grabbed a couple on sale and theyíre now my goto layers for ski purposes.
    They got a name for the winners in the world

    http://procatinator.com/?cat=80

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    84
    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    I use merino base layers when riding lifts, but I sweat a lot in the skin track and wool doesn’t dry as quickly as plastic..
    This is my experience as well - few things less savoury than having $100 of wet wool on your skin all day during high output activity.

  11. #11
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    Feb 2007
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    Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
    In the car i keep some heavy Smartwool long sleeve shirt, to stay nice and toasty once back, way better than cotton.
    I'm more passionate about this issue than the main topic here - nothing is better than a short-sleeved cotton t-shirt (or cotton/synthetic blend) for the drive home after skiing. Throw a fuzzy fleece on if the car heater isn't adequate.

    As for wool vs. poly, I go back and forth but the more time goes on the less I like 100% wool layers. Just too fragile and don't last. Heavier-weight 100% wool is fine for riding lifts, but I'm coming around to synthetics for single-day trips where stink doesn't matter so much. I'm a big fan of wool/poly blends these days too, best of both worlds. I stick with synthetic layers more often than not unless it's going to be pretty cold in the BC.
    "High risers are for people with fused ankles, jongs and dudes who are too fat to see their dick or touch their toes.
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  12. #12
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    Jan 2018
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    Gallatin County
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
    These are the old model, with no smell prevention technology. Bottom line, after half day they stink as hell.
    Stinky base layers can be effectively managed by washing the garments in powdered soap as there are no surfactants and a liberal douse ( 3 or 4 cap fulls) of Listerine in the washing machine. The original Listerine (the yellow fluid) or the generic effectively kills the bacteria that causes the funk in synthetics that are soaked in sweat periodically. Original Lysol liquid works too, but the disinfectant smell on the washed base layers is almost as bad as sweat funk to me.

  13. #13
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    Oct 2008
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    Wenatchee
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    If youíre not married to the idea of outdoorsy brands, the Platinum II from Coldpruf is great for riding lifts and short skin laps. Itís two layers with the inside 100% polyester and the outer wool poly blend. Really good quality and price


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  14. #14
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by bean View Post
    I'm more passionate about this issue than the main topic here - nothing is better than a short-sleeved cotton t-shirt (or cotton/synthetic blend) for the drive home after skiing. Throw a fuzzy fleece on if the car heater isn't adequate.

    As for wool vs. poly, I go back and forth but the more time goes on the less I like 100% wool layers. Just too fragile and don't last. Heavier-weight 100% wool is fine for riding lifts, but I'm coming around to synthetics for single-day trips where stink doesn't matter so much. I'm a big fan of wool/poly blends these days too, best of both worlds. I stick with synthetic layers more often than not unless it's going to be pretty cold in the BC.
    this ^^ wool gets a hole in it if you look at it wrong, I could show you 6 or 7 brands of merino with holes in them, some belonged to my 80 yr old father who put holes in them watching TV

    but wool absolutely does not stink SO wear a 100 weight wool T-shirt next to the skin for the no stink and thro a poly over it

    if you are gona be close to a washing machine just wear the poly once and wash

    As for warmth I don't see how a merino layer that thin is going to be any warmer than a poly layer that thin but whatever
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #15
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    Sep 2010
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    For aerobic activity at work or play, if the temps are warmer than -15C, 200wt merino longsleeve, followed by a poly t-shirt dry-wear similar to what the hockey players use, then a heavyweight wool stanfield henley. The henley comes off if I am sweating more than usual. If it's -20C or colder, drywear t-shirt is replaced by another 200wt merino t-shirt. Above -5C and no merino base layer; just the drywear (probably a long sleeve) with the wool henley. Hardshell as needed for the conditions.
    So, a mix and match of the insulating layers and the wicking synthetics. I do find the merino baselayers don't get so wet with the synthetic wicking shirt above pulling the moisture away.
    And yes, any fresh and dry soft shirt in the vehicle on the way home is luxury.

  16. #16
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    Feb 2018
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    85
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    but wool absolutely does not stink SO wear a 100 weight wool T-shirt next to the skin for the no stink and thro a poly over it
    wouldnt this imply that the first wool layer remain wet?

  17. #17
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    Sep 2010
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    Shuswap Highlands
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    Regarding the durability of merino, I find it makes a big difference how it is put on and off. Grabbing a section of fabric and stretching it like cotton or poly, especially when wet, is what kills it. If the fabric is rolled on or off instead, it last way longer. I have 150 and 200wt shirts and bottoms that almost made it a decade before their first hole. The collars and hems of the poly don't last much longer for me.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    1,045
    Quote Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
    - still patagonia Capilene midweight, trusting that the new models will not be as stinky (HeiQ Fresh they call it...)
    I think the new midweight does a bit better job of not getting stinky. It's still a synthetic and picks up smells like one. YMMV

    The bigger issue to me is that when Pata changed from Capilene1-4 to Capilene Daily, Midweight, and Thermal they really lost some of the versatility. Cap2 Lightweight was perfect, I could wear it all day and night summer backpacking or bike riding in the alpine while the new Daily is nice during the day but gets cold at night. Cap2 is my goto for skiing underneath a fleece and softshell. Super easy to regulate temp using that setup with a puffy stashed in my pack for cold lifts or hanging out up top.

    The new Midweight is good for cold skiing, like the old Cap3 Midweight, but is too hot on days warmer than ~20F with any midlayer between the base layer and a softshell. I haven't gone anywhere near the newest Capilene Air because $130 for a baselayer shirt is bullshit.

  19. #19
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorcar View Post
    wouldnt this imply that the first wool layer remain wet?
    I've seen a lot of people on tour that sweat alot I assume becuz they wear too much,

    I might wear a T and a second light poly layer if its cold, I have mid layers for other things but I would never use a mid layer ski touring so mostly just a base layer under the soft shell with a puffy over, the puffy comes off 10 min down the trail after I have warmed up, puffy goes back on when I stop

    A wet layer might even dry out a bit from body heat inside a soft shell if I am on the move making heat

    it should be called " back country skiing and layer seleection

    A wool T with another layer over top will Hide all the holes in the T, I got a smart wool with a hole in the sleeve after about a year where the cuff went over my watch or how about 80 yr old dad watching TV in his condo ?

    "Name:  hole.jpg
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    this was one of my favorite Smart wool, maybe I can get warranty ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Seattle
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    38
    For baselayers resort or tour, i go synthetic for bottoms , and 100% merino on top. Others have mentioned not all brands are the same. I love Smartwool , but they do not last for athletic activity. Great to around the house or an easy hike.
    Most durable I have found is Ice Breaker , I have treated them terribly and they keep shape and form and warm

    For winter running , cannot do wool , too much continuous high intensity output

  21. #21
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    Sep 2006
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    Fraggle Rock, CO
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    I'm with bean, a poly wool blend is a great compromise in terms of moisture management, anti stank, durability, and comfort. I have at >100 washes on a 50/50 merino poly supernatural base layer top and it fits, works, and feels the same as it did when it was new. I've got some holes in a few 100% merino shirts (I machine wash and dry all of them) but the blends have held up remarkably well.
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
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  22. #22
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by bean View Post
    the more time goes on the less I like 100% wool layers. Just too fragile and don't last. Heavier-weight 100% wool is fine for riding lifts, but I'm coming around to synthetics for single-day trips where stink doesn't matter so much. I'm a big fan of wool/poly blends these days too, best of both worlds. I stick with synthetic layers more often than not unless it's going to be pretty cold in the BC.
    I agree completely. I like synthetic and I've had a couple blends that are great too. In addition to being less durable and slower to dry, I just find merino less comfortable on my skin. On long days I get chaffing on my lower back. When I'm touring and it's cold I wear an R1 hoody as a base layer. It's just about perfect.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    5,039
    Iíve been happy with Le Bent wool socks and base layers; not itchy.

  24. #24
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Almost Mountains
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    If you haven't tried getting a synthetic-specific detergent for your capilene, I'd start there. I think it was a thread here that turned me on to Win: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K0X36XA

    I find it difficult not to soak either wool or poly, and I find damp wool to be highly preferable to damp plastic; I also find that wool does dry enough to feel dry, if I manage to stop sweating or if I go inside and take a break. It does matter that your midlayer(s) and top layer also allow for breathing, though, too; if the midlayer is too heavy, no base layer is going to breathe successfully.

    i still have some cap 2 and cap 3 stuff I'll wear if I think the weather/activity combo warrants it, but I strongly prefer lightweight wool stuff in general. I've found the Smartwool stuff to be pretty decent for holding up, while almost anything cheaper I've tried has fallen into the "look at it funny and it has a hole" category. Again, YMMV.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
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    Patagonia thermal weight is warm, durable and not prone to stinking. Love mine.

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