Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    27

    Insulated bladder for touring pack

    I use a Patagonia SnowDrifter 30L as my main touring pack and it has the passthroughs/hanging mechanisms for a bladder but I haven't been able to find anything that actually fits with a long enough hose. I have a couple of the Hydrapak ones that came with various biking packs but their hose doesn't reach far enough (and aren't insulated). I bought a salomon one for winter trail running that has the same issue - hose too short.

    Does anyone have any recs? I ski in UT so not dealing with the coldest of temps. I'm trying to actually drink water when I tour this year...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    224
    I have Osprey packs and bladders, including their insulation kit. The hose that comes with the kit is much longer than the standard hose - probably a bit too long but you can always cut it down. It works well though - nice in summer for keeping things chilled and nice in winter for preventing freezing.

    It looks like they also sell the hose and cover separately of the bladder cover if that's all you need. Osprey and Hydrapack reservoirs and fittings are the same in recent years.

    Full insulation kit: https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...4SEAS_507.html

    Hose only insulation kit: https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...SES20_507.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF & the Ho
    Posts
    6,788
    I drink my own urine because itís sterile and it tastes good

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Not Brooklyn
    Posts
    7,640
    Do the bladder companies keep hose lengths secret? Those little hydration packs come with shorter hoses because they're small. This one doesn't seem too hard to figure out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    10,417
    Drink water on the transition or midway up a long skin. Use a bottle or thermos in your pack. I never understood the appeal of hydration packs.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,066
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Drink water on the transition or midway up a long skin. Use a bottle or thermos in your pack. I never understood the appeal of hydration packs.
    +1 on this. I was a longtime hydration pack user and finally started just using bottles last year, it's so much easier and not worth messing with the pack anymore. Nalgene makes some lightweight bottles that really cut the weight down. Plus with bottles you always know how much youve used, leading to better hydration and no surprises toward the last laps of the tour when you run out of your bladder (or open your pack and find out you only drank .5L of your 2L bladder and will feel like shit after your apres-tour beers/whiskey.)

    If OP is set on using one, I've also had good luck with the Osprey ones, they seem to have longer tubes so you can cut it down to size. I've also never had one leak.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Not Brooklyn
    Posts
    7,640
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Drink water on the transition or midway up a long skin. Use a bottle or thermos in your pack. I never understood the appeal of hydration packs.
    And if a bladder fails....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    10,417
    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    And if a bladder fails....
    Thereís that disaster tooÖ


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,106
    Camelbak bladders are pretty freaking durable.

    Though, nothing will prevent freezing outright. That just means you aren't drinking enough water consistently and/or the ambient temps are just really really frigid. Also, blow the water back into the tube after drinking, cuts down on the tube freezing. Pinch the bite valve to empty remaining water in between sips.

    I use both a bladder and water bottles. Drink out of the water bottle during transitions/breaks and use the bladder while ascending or when conditions don't warrant stopping and fiddling with pack, like on a windy summit when you just want to get down.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Top o pahto
    Posts
    424
    Bottles vs bladders, the ultimate question...

    Never had a bladder fail. Have had bottles unscrew themselves in my pack with shitty results. I know, blame my shitty grip strength not the bottle.

    Bladders on day trips, add bottles for overnights. A bladder is a just a soft water bottle that is more convenient to drink out of.

    Listen to Jax about blowing water back down the tube. Use a non-barbed mouthpiece, like platypus hyflow - makes it easier to slip off the hose to clear it out when you freeze the tube or mouthpiece. Forget those thin neoprene sleeves. See: https://tinyurl.com/5cd6337x

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    408
    Quote Originally Posted by Jax View Post
    I use both a bladder and water bottles. Drink out of the water bottle during transitions/breaks and use the bladder while ascending or when conditions don't warrant stopping and fiddling with pack, like on a windy summit when you just want to get down.
    I agree that there is a place for both. I greatly prefer a water bottle, but a bladder holds the weight so much more comfortably.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinned View Post
    I have Osprey packs and bladders, including their insulation kit. The hose that comes with the kit is much longer than the standard hose - probably a bit too long but you can always cut it down. It works well though - nice in summer for keeping things chilled and nice in winter for preventing freezing.

    It looks like they also sell the hose and cover separately of the bladder cover if that's all you need. Osprey and Hydrapack reservoirs and fittings are the same in recent years.

    Full insulation kit: https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...4SEAS_507.html

    Hose only insulation kit: https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...SES20_507.html
    Havenít tried the insulation kit but Iíve been very happy with their bladder systems and would recommend them.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    10,417
    I donít think Iíve ever noticed 2-3 liters in my touring pack. I like bottles because I know exactly how much water that Iíve consumed and have left. Itís also nice to have a water bottle and a insulated bottle for hot tea. Bladders work for some but they seem like a hassle compared to a bottle. If you want the convenience on the skintrack, the insulated coozies that you can clip to your hip belt are nice. The shoulder strap mounted ones are nice too.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    460
    Donít know if they make the 1/2 liter ones still but one of these in a pant pocket for access and then a Nalgene bottle in the pack is where Iíve ended up. Light, accessible and simple

    https://www.rei.com/product/797975/p...e-cap-17-fl-oz

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    73
    Osprey insulation system works well. I also use the trail running soft flask from Decathlon or Salomon when I donít use a backpack.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    27
    Re the bladder vs bottle debate, I hear all the arguments for the bottle, but in practice I just never drink anything out of my bottle (maybe my bottle isn't ideal?). I don't really like taking mid skin breaks (on an average day) and often in transition I'm just trying hard to keep warm and don't want another thing to fiddle around with. The allure of a magic tube of water that I can drink at any time seems too great to not at least try... Thanks for the recs on the Osprey stuff, I'm gonna check it out.

    As for the bottle drinkers, do you do anything to make your bottle super easy to access? Can you drink while skinning or at least not have to unbuckle anything to access your water? Just trying to think through what I might be missing...

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    296
    Quote Originally Posted by sidewaysbeater View Post
    Re the bladder vs bottle debate, I hear all the arguments for the bottle, but in practice I just never drink anything out of my bottle (maybe my bottle isn't ideal?). I don't really like taking mid skin breaks (on an average day) and often in transition I'm just trying hard to keep warm and don't want another thing to fiddle around with. The allure of a magic tube of water that I can drink at any time seems too great to not at least try... Thanks for the recs on the Osprey stuff, I'm gonna check it out.

    As for the bottle drinkers, do you do anything to make your bottle super easy to access? Can you drink while skinning or at least not have to unbuckle anything to access your water? Just trying to think through what I might be missing...
    Yeah kinda like Tang said, I clip a 500mL to my hip belt and drink that while skinning, then refill at the bottom from the larger bottle/drom in the pack. Helps me track my intake as I'll gulp down a 2L bladder in one lap if I'm not looking. Toss it in a pocket when it's cold.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    9,307
    Iíve never had the length of the hose be an issue with any of my half dozen hydration bladders, but just go to the hardware store and clip off some hose to whatever length you like. JFC
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    I’ve never had the length of the hose be an issue with any of my half dozen hydration bladders, but just go to the hardware store and clip off some hose to whatever length you like. JFC
    Well it's not just the hose, all the bladders I have sit/hang very awkwardly in my touring pack (either too wide or too short), even though it's clearly built for one. I can't find any info online about my particular pack and bladders.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    7,274
    I drink probably 2X as much water as most people (winter and summer) and still prefer bottles for winter. I usually skin short enough laps that I just take a good swig when I stop. I do like using an insulated sleeve for the bottle (Nalgene makes one) but you can get away without one.

    On the occasions I want something easier to access, I'll either strap the insulated sleeve to the side of my pack (where I can reach it with the pack on, albeit awkwardly) or carry a 0.5L Platypus soft bottle in an inside jacket pocket or pants cargo pocket.

    In springtime I switch to bladders. Usually if it's warm enough that I need to drink more regularly to justify the bladder, it's also warm enough to not freeze.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paper St. Soap Co.
    Posts
    2,781
    I just blow air into the hose after drinking and zip it back into the shoulder sleeve. I have found the drink valve is most likely spot to freeze up (when I forget to blow air) and tube insulation wouldn't help that much. Use bladder for touring and resort. Resort much more often freeze up.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2021
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by 406 View Post
    I just blow air into the hose after drinking and zip it back into the shoulder sleeve. I have found the drink valve is most likely spot to freeze up (when I forget to blow air) and tube insulation wouldn't help that much. Use bladder for touring and resort. Resort much more often freeze up.
    Definitely seconded. Gotta just make sure you get the water out of the tube or you're gonna have a bad day.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,066
    Quote Originally Posted by abx656 View Post
    Definitely seconded. Gotta just make sure you get the water out of the tube or you're gonna have a bad day.
    When your bladder is down to 1/2 cup or soÖ.what proportion of that would you say is your own backwash?

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2,069
    Not to drift to far from insulated bladders, but there was chatter on here or maybe the splitboard forum about not carrying any water with you. The poster's way of going about it was to camel-up before the tour and melt snow as needed during his tours. IIRC, he went solo most of the time, so making the group wait was not an issue. I do not practice this approach, but I always think about it every season.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,066
    Quote Originally Posted by SKIP IN7RO View Post
    Not to drift to far from insulated bladders, but there was chatter on here or maybe the splitboard forum about not carrying any water with you. The poster's way of going about it was to camel-up before the tour and melt snow as needed during his tours. IIRC, he went solo most of the time, so making the group wait was not an issue. I do not practice this approach, but I always think about it every season.
    Carrying a stove and fuel and then taking the time to melt and cool enough to drink seems like carrying a water bottle but with a lot of extra steps and time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •