Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    8530' MST/200' EST
    Posts
    3,373

    WTB: ~0 deg. backpacking sleeping bag

    Title pretty much says it all. Looking to add yet another bag to my quiver for backpacking. I have a BA 20deg that's great and all but I feel like that bag runs a bit cold, so I'm looking for something in the 0 deg to 15 deg range that's a furnace. I end up sleeping in ~2 layers of long underwear (top/bottom) and was still cold when temps hit ~38 the other night. I upgraded my pad to a higher R, but think a colder bag would be the icing on the cake. i've got some access to some pro deals, just seeing if anyone is cleaning out the closet first.

    Down, sub 3 lbs if possible.
    Reg length, left zip
    "If we can't bring the mountain to the party, let's bring the PARTY to the MOUNTAIN!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake Chitty, UT
    Posts
    1,170
    Have you considered adding a thermo liner or a higher R value pad? If your local to SLC, feel free to swing by and try some stuff out.
    You took too much man, too much, too much

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    8530' MST/200' EST
    Posts
    3,373
    Yeah, I just bought a new pad, going from R 3.1 to 4.8, so that should help a lot. I used my girlfriends silk liner on the night i was cold, however, that doesn't really add much. I might pick up one of those SeatoSummit Reactors, but, I also may order an enlightened equipt. 0 quilt because im a sucker for new stuff.
    "If we can't bring the mountain to the party, let's bring the PARTY to the MOUNTAIN!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake Chitty, UT
    Posts
    1,170
    I have a reactor if you want to give it whirl ...
    You took too much man, too much, too much

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    7,057
    Quote Originally Posted by Phall View Post
    Yeah, I just bought a new pad, going from R 3.1 to 4.8, so that should help a lot. I used my girlfriends silk liner on the night i was cold, however, that doesn't really add much. I might pick up one of those SeatoSummit Reactors, but, I also may order an enlightened equipt. 0 quilt because im a sucker for new stuff.
    Iím a cold sleeper when camping and I canít quite wrap my head around using a quilt. It seems like any kind of draft in cold temps would ruin my sleep. Like rolling over or something that would reposition the quilt and possibly replace a ton of warm air with cold air. Even at 35 degrees I have to have a draft collar around my shoulders so I donít have that cold air leaking down into the bag.

    As far as temp ratings, my Marmot bag is the most accurate of any that Iíve used previously (never used a Ďpremiumí brand like WM). Iíve used the Helium, which is rated to 15 degrees, down to lower teens and slept comfortably.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    8530' MST/200' EST
    Posts
    3,373
    I've got a few friends pointing me to quilts, they rave about them, but I'm not sure I "Get it"
    "If we can't bring the mountain to the party, let's bring the PARTY to the MOUNTAIN!"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    An Anheuser-Busch Barley Field
    Posts
    5,316
    Have a WM ultralite (20įF) that I feel could easily be used in colder temps with a variety of techniques. 99% of the time I sleep in just regular underwear and have to keep it unzipped if temps are above freezing. The pad I use has an R value of 2.4.

    Never given it much thought, but donít think Iíd classify myself as a ďcold sleeperĒ. Sometimes get chilly feet but think thatís more of a circulation issue.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    162
    I use a Hammock Gear Economy Burrow (quilt) and a Thermarest Z-Lite and it's great down to 25. I'm in tights, base layer, and a jacket (light down) plus warm socks and a beanie. Sans quilt, I'd be comfortable in the clothing down to 50 degrees probably. Between 20 and 25, I add another jacket but feel like the michelin man.

    IDK if I would "rave" about quilts. I got one just because it makes sense - you don't get any insulation from lying on top of compressed down, so why have it? Sleeping bags seem more convenient when you're in them (you have to pull the sides of the quilt under you to keep heat in, for example), but sleeping bags are less convenient when you're not in them. So that's the trade off.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    7,057
    Quote Originally Posted by CirqueScaler View Post

    - you don't get any insulation from lying on top of compressed down, so why have it?
    Because I roll around, a lot, when camping.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    732

    WTB: ~0 deg. backpacking sleeping bag

    I roll around a bunch and like to move my legs which is exactly why I love my 20-degree EE revelation quilt. When itís not terribly cold (say average summer night at higher elevations) I just use it like a blanket.

    When it dips below freezing you can cinch up the toe box so that it works like a bag and itís got two tiny straps that pull the sides under a sleeping pad so that it functions mostly like a bag. Itís still easy to roll around since itís fixed to the pad.

    Iíve camped on snow with it on nights in the low 20s (with a WM hotsac liner and an xtherm pad) and been nice and warm.

    Awesome piece of kit, incredibly lightweight. Doesnít cost a ton either.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    162
    Ah okay. I don't really roll around when I sleep. Like I said, I don't "rave" about quilts, but it makes sense for me to have one.

    it’s got two tiny straps that pull the sides under a sleeping pad so that it functions mostly like a bag.

    This too ^^ I don't have a pad attachment kit but they seem useful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    1,074
    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I’m a cold sleeper when camping and I can’t quite wrap my head around using a quilt. It seems like any kind of draft in cold temps would ruin my sleep. Like rolling over or something that would reposition the quilt and possibly replace a ton of warm air with cold air. Even at 35 degrees I have to have a draft collar around my shoulders so I don’t have that cold air leaking down into the bag.

    As far as temp ratings, my Marmot bag is the most accurate of any that I’ve used previously (never used a ‘premium’ brand like WM). I’ve used the Helium, which is rated to 15 degrees, down to lower teens and slept comfortably.
    same experience with Helium - i freakin LOVE that thing.

    i've got a Ember 20 degree quilt and used it one night. haven't been able to dial in the experience yet with it, but damn it's light as hell and could certainly be right for some people. the main issue i have with the quilt is it does not have a hood (obviously, due to quilt design, right?) . i LOVE having a hood on my sleeping bags tho. jury is out on the quilt.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by jmedslc View Post
    same experience with Helium - i freakin LOVE that thing.

    i've got a Ember 20 degree quilt and used it one night. haven't been able to dial in the experience yet with it, but damn it's light as hell and could certainly be right for some people. the main issue i have with the quilt is it does not have a hood (obviously, due to quilt design, right?) . i LOVE having a hood on my sleeping bags tho. jury is out on the quilt.
    If you got the regular length, the Sea To Summit quilts are significantly narrower than most of the competition and can be more challenging to use for that reason

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •