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  1. #51
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    Aug 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulster2626 View Post
    Not just goggles but WTF happened to the price of ski pants? Jesus, they're insane now.
    My new strategy for jackets or pants is to buy from company with a good warranty and/or that does repairs. Once it rips or starts falling apart, you get it repaired or they'll offer you something new for a deep discount. I've done this with a few Marmot and Patagucci jackets lately.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulster2626 View Post
    Not just goggles but WTF happened to the price of ski pants? Jesus, they're insane now.
    Patagonia Snowshot pants are decent for about $200.

    Flylow always seems to have a half off sale in the late spring. I bought a pair of Chemical pants for $160 last year.

  3. #53
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    Oct 2003
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    Big in Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by HankScorpio View Post
    My new strategy for jackets or pants is to buy from company with a good warranty and/or that does repairs. Once it rips or starts falling apart, you get it repaired or they'll offer you something new for a deep discount. I've done this with a few Marmot and Patagucci jackets lately.
    Yup. Patagonia sent me credit for almost a new jacket after my 25 year old parka failed. I didn't even ask them for it.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  4. #54
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    Sep 2004
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    Again, Costco. Cheaper in store whenever they arrive - probably within a month.

    https://www.costco.com/CatalogSearch...eyword=Goggles
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  5. #55
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    Feb 2010
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    Portland by way of Bozeman
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    skier days were less last year than 00/01, they’ve been flat (oscillating in a 50-60 million band, but a downward trend line) for two decades +. But the marginal hills have died and the “big names” ie mostly the west get the biz
    That doesn't explain why our local-ish hills were absolutely HAMMERED with people last year. Record numbers and pass sales were ended early due to demand.

    Quote Originally Posted by yeahman View Post

    Flylow always seems to have a half off sale in the late spring. I bought a pair of Chemical pants for $160 last year.
    Good warranty and solid customer service. Worth it.

  6. #56
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    Oct 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat Sig View Post
    That doesn't explain why our local-ish hills were absolutely HAMMERED with people last year. Record numbers and pass sales were ended early due to demand.


    .
    Nobody travelled. Canada and Europe shut down.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  7. #57
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    Oct 2007
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    bucks county pa
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeahman View Post
    Patagonia Snowshot pants are decent for about $200.

    Flylow always seems to have a half off sale in the late spring. I bought a pair of Chemical pants for $160 last year.
    Truth be told by yeahman . I have been wearing the flylow chemical pants for years and never paid more than 170 - 200 on sale. Great pants and don’t over look the baker bibs as well. Can’t go wrong.
    Our little bump here in Pa (spring mount ski area) where I teach lessons was sold out almost the entire season everyday. Place was packed 7 days a week and had to hire more instructors a quarter of the way through our season. Expecting the same this winter. As far as inflation with gear, it is what it is
    You have the cheap and the very expensive however remember you get what you pay for. I prefer to spend more for better ski clothes but don’t need the latest look at 50 years old every other year. Brother in law spent 150 on pants and was to cheap to buy the flylow I found him for 200. After the first storm his ass was wet and I was dry. He now has a pair of flylow that he picked up on sale in may. Hope all has a great season this year
    always forward but never straight

  8. #58
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    Jul 2016
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    NY
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    Not for nothin but $150 ought to buy you a dry ass. What brand did he spend that money on and get a wet ass?

  9. #59
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    Oct 2007
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    bucks county pa
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    ^^^A pair of north face if I remember correctly non goretex or high quality water proof material May have been a tad less then 150 but anything worth a shit in dec is gonna be 200 or more and same a jacket/ shell! Was not soaked through but wet!
    always forward but never straight

  10. #60
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    Jan 2011
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    Alta
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    Only pants I’ve ever had that soaked through were fly low bibs. Soaked through after 2 runs of light dry Utah snow. At least I got my money back.

  11. #61
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    Sep 2009
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    summit county
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    Haven’t paid full price for my last two pairs of goggles, been fortunate to always know someone with a Smith code, but even at half off the i/o mag was pretty damn expensive last season.

  12. #62
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    Dec 2009
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    Portlandia
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    I see the poors are in to skiing.
    Training for Alpental

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sessiøn View Post
    I see the poors are in to skiing.
    What’s your number, bro?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "With Hitler, the more I learn about the guy, the more I don't care for him." -Norm Macdonald

  14. #64
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    Oct 2015
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    474
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    Top of the line mountain bike in 95 was a steel or aluminum frame with a front shock. Top of the line MTB now is exotic carbon fiber with a complex rear suspension and super light components all around. Of course, now, price is jacked up to the highest bidder because parts are so hard to come by.

    Oh, and, anybody and everybody bought a bike last year. Less people ski.
    OK, but so how does that explain why ski hardgoods are exempt from 25 years of inflation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    Yup. Patagonia sent me credit for almost a new jacket after my 25 year old parka failed. I didn't even ask them for it.
    They just knew you were skiing around in a clapped-out jacket and really wanted you representing them in something current?

  15. #65
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    Oct 2003
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    Big in Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by One (+) Sentence View Post
    OK, but so how does that explain why ski hardgoods are exempt from 25 years of inflation?


    For the same reason that televisions and washing machines and cars are exempt. Lower labor costs from offshoring, and much improved manufacturing techniques, including logistics. And they're not only cheaper, they're much better. And the price of goggles should be, maybe, 10 bucks by that logic, but, like I said, cool costs.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  16. #66
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    Oct 2015
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    474
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    Top of the line mountain bike in 95 was a steel or aluminum frame with a front shock. Top of the line MTB now is exotic carbon fiber with a complex rear suspension and super light components all around. Of course, now, price is jacked up to the highest bidder because parts are so hard to come by.

    Oh, and, anybody and everybody bought a bike last year. Less people ski.
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    For the same reason that televisions and washing machines and cars are exempt. Lower labor costs from offshoring, and much improved manufacturing techniques, including logistics. And they're not only cheaper, they're much better. And the price of goggles should be, maybe, 10 bucks by that logic, but, like I said, cool costs.
    I guess I never considered Western Europe (where the vast majority of alpine skis were made in 1995 and still are today) to be “offshore” labor. Bike brands are the ones who have moved their labor almost entirely to Asia.

    So bikes got so much better in this timeframe, so they’re more expensive. And skis have also gotten much better, but they cost the same?

    I know, I know, K2 and Line make some stuff in Asia now…

  17. #67
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeahman View Post
    Patagonia Snowshot pants are decent for about $200.

    Flylow always seems to have a half off sale in the late spring. I bought a pair of Chemical pants for $160 last year.
    FKNA. My goggles will be more expensive than my pants later this year.

    Thanks!

  18. #68
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    Oct 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by One (+) Sentence View Post
    I guess I never considered Western Europe (where the vast majority of alpine skis were made in 1995 and still are today) to be “offshore” labor. Bike brands are the ones who have moved their labor almost entirely to Asia.

    So bikes got so much better in this timeframe, so they’re more expensive. And skis have also gotten much better, but they cost the same?

    I know, I know, K2 and Line make some stuff in Asia now…
    It's complicated.

    https://www.newschoolers.com/news/read/Where-Skis-Whom

    (Eastern europe is cheap labor)


    Can't really say what specifically is going on in MTB world, especially now, with manufacturers leaving China and even Taiwan due to increasing wages, and then the disruptions from Trump's trade wars with China and now Corona lockdowns in Malaysia, but I highly suspect that the real high end stuff is made in different facilities than the mid to low market product being churned out by third worlders. Although they're trying to reduce costs, no doubt. Me, I'm old school. Custom built steel road bikes.

    As for goggles, it's amazing that something so easy to produce these days are so expensive. I bought full mats for my car a few years ago from Weather Tech that are awesome. Two front, one big rear seat area, and rear hatch area mat for a little over 300 bucks, really well made, and they fit like a glove. I assume they are the result of very modern 3D scanning and manufacturing tech. I think they are actually made in America, too. (Edit: Yes, they are:https://www.weathertech.com/behindtech/ ) If I can buy quality like that at that price, my sunglasses and goggles should cost 10 bucks.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  19. #69
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    Feb 2010
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    Portland by way of Bozeman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sessiøn View Post
    I see the poors are in to skiing.
    I about spit beer all over my monitor. Well played, sir. Well played.

    Also, new username? whodis

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    The CH
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    1,452
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Again, Costco. Cheaper in store whenever they arrive - probably within a month.

    https://www.costco.com/CatalogSearch...eyword=Goggles
    Are the spy goggle they sell any good?

  21. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Basalt
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    4,607
    Quote Originally Posted by Todds View Post
    Are the spy goggle they sell any good?
    Oh man…I forgot about Spy. My first goggle.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "We had nice 3 days in your autonomous mountain realm last weekend." - Tom from Austria (the Rax ski guy)

  22. #72
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    251
    I'm getting the Costco Spy Goggles, then I can always go skiing wherever I want with the permission lens:
    "Interchangeable Lenses, Includes Permission Lens"

  23. #73
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    Oct 2007
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    bucks county pa
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    Gonna check Out the spy’s Always thought of them as dirt bike goggles
    always forward but never straight

  24. #74
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    Aug 2008
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    Where the climate suits my clothes.
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    4,875
    I had a pair of Spy goggles bought cheap probably 8ish years ago. Fit was fine, but foam quickly fell off and the lens was too dark to be practical even in and out of shadows on bluebird sunny days.

  25. #75
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Sun Peaks Resort
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    563
    Quote Originally Posted by The Artist Formerly Known as Leavenworth Skier View Post
    Another vote for the squad, i just buy multiple pairs and don't screw around with lens swaps. For truly wet storm days that also means I can swap to dry goggles at lunch.
    I

    I have 3 pair of Smith Squad Chromapop goggles, Sunny day lens, Storm lens, and Everyday lens. They are cylindrical lenses and as such are a lot less expensive than spherical lenses. I got mine extra cheap on a pro deal when I worked at a ski shop.
    This is what I leaned about lenses:
    Lenses start out flat and for spherical lenses they are stretched evenly into a bulbous shape. Lenses get thinner when shaped and stretched and the more expensive spherical lens remain the same thickness throughout the process and as such they provide optical correctness by always looking thru the same thickness of lens.
    Cylindrical lenses are bent in 2 distinct spots to shape the lens creating a thin spot at the bend meaning you end up looking thru different thickness of lens.

    Smith does not buy lenses from off shore, they make they own lenses in their factory in Utah. For cylindrical lenses what Smith does is produce a lens that when it is still flat prior to bending, it is made thicker at the future bend points. So when they bend and shape the lens, the bend points stretch and get thinner at the bend points with the new thinness matching the thickness of the unbent portion, creating an optically correct lens of uniform thickness and thus no optical distortion with a inexpensive lens.
    Cylindrical lenses are best for those who rarely have lens fogging issues. The spherical lens offers more air space between lens and eyes and this helps those that have chronic lens fogging problems.

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