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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    32,504
    Quote Originally Posted by old_newguy View Post
    Thanks, I got the Buffalo referral from TGR back in 2013/2014. From you if I recall.

    And thanks to the rest of you have offered your input. I'm down the rabbit hole.

    For the coax, if I have a cable modem sending and receiving data on that line can I use it with a MOCA adapter (i see it mentioned in the article, just not clear on the terminology yet)?

    At this point the biggest thing I am running up is my internal cheap bastard, curiosity, aesthetics and skepticism around what data these companies are collecting via their apps and software running these mesh networks. My wife would have just bought one 2 weeks ago and been done with it.

    I cannot believe how much money it costs to buy one of these mesh systems, I also just don't like how they look. I have a perfectly functional wireless/wired router in my Buffalo wifi router, can I just add a powered and ethernet (or coax) connected access point like "the_prof" did? If I am reading correctly it seems like it shouldn't be that hard to configure, but maybe I'm underestimating the complexity of getting it to be a seamless experience. Or better, just add a POE adapter downstream of my existing router, run some CAT5/6 and mount an AP.

    The big appeal of a POE access point is that I can mount it in an out of the way location so I don't have to use up a outlet, provide it somewhere to sit and look at it. I could do a single cable pull from my current router location via the attic to a central location in my house in the hallway where I could mount it on the upper wall like a fire alarm and never think about it again. Neighbor is a low voltage electrician who could help me with tool for cable terminations, but I'm definitely not an expert on configuring a network.
    Your wife was right.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    73
    Since you're a cheap bastard like me, I would run ethernet to the other side of the house and buy another cheap wireless router to set up as an access point. You can also forego the ethernet cable and get powerline adapters (ethernet through the power outlets) assuming the two outlets you want to use are on the same phase.

    Stop renting a shitting modem from comcast @$10/month and go buy a cheap $70 Arris surfboard or something from amazon.

    Once you get the wires in and the other router in place, make sure to give it a static IP address so that your main router and secondary router aren't tripping over each others toes. Best to google it, but the main router gets the signal from the modem and declares that router 2 is IP 192.167.0.5 or something like that. Then router 2 can distribute IPs 100 to 255 and router one can still distribute IPs 6-99. Then you can make them have the same wifi name and password and all will be good.

    Or buy a mesh network like EERO or google and be done with it.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    1,089
    I figured out I can drill 2 holes and run a 75ft CAT6 patchcord right to where I want via the attic. Planning to install a TP Link EAP225 POE access point wired back to my existing wireless router and modem which I am going to move into another space to get off my desk. Iíll see if I can get the new AP and old WiFi router to play nice on the SSID front, otherwise Iíll just run a separate SSID or turn off the wifi transmitters if the new coverage is better. I figure having the AP more centered in the house will help a bunch.

    This moves me from Wifi 4 to 5 so I figure that will help a little and I donít see the point of wifi6 for my scenario.

    EAP225 comes with a POE injector standard in the box so that solves that issue.

    I donít think Iíve ever rented a modem, owning pays for itself in like 10 months.

    I also figured out I have lathe and plaster ceilings and I assume walls. Never lived in a house without cracked lathe and plaster so assumed it was drywall.

    Maybe I will regret all this and by a mesh. To be seen.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    5,626
    I have a CAT5 running through the crawl space to the master bedroom at the back if the house. Had another WiFi router there as an extender for awhile. Everything on the other side of the kitchen was a dead zone with 2 fridges, a tall freezer, washer, and dryer blocking the signal. I move the big router to the doorway instead of on the wall in the living room when I upgraded that router. Now we only use the CAT5 in the bedroom to connect a work PC directly. TV, Joey, tablets, etc all work fine now with a better router and better placement.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Park City
    Posts
    4,135
    Orbi has been outstanding for our house with lots of weird corners and a mother in law. Blazing fast no dead spots.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I rip the groomed on tele gear

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Among Greatness All Around
    Posts
    5,821
    Quote Originally Posted by old_newguy View Post
    I figured out I can drill 2 holes and run a 75ft CAT6 patchcord right to where I want via the attic. Planning to install a TP Link EAP225 POE access point wired back to my existing wireless router and modem which I am going to move into another space to get off my desk. I’ll see if I can get the new AP and old WiFi router to play nice on the SSID front, otherwise I’ll just run a separate SSID or turn off the wifi transmitters if the new coverage is better. I figure having the AP more centered in the house will help a bunch.

    This moves me from Wifi 4 to 5 so I figure that will help a little and I don’t see the point of wifi6 for my scenario.

    EAP225 comes with a POE injector standard in the box so that solves that issue.

    I don’t think I’ve ever rented a modem, owning pays for itself in like 10 months.

    I also figured out I have lathe and plaster ceilings and I assume walls. Never lived in a house without cracked lathe and plaster so assumed it was drywall.

    Maybe I will regret all this and by a mesh. To be seen.
    If you are only replacing your equipment every 7 to 9 years, I'd go wifi6 now for anything you do. Also if you have lathe and plaster- that is one of the worst materials for killing wifi (but below a wall with a wire mesh and plaster or full metal building and getting any wifi outside of that building. )

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    1,089
    Quote Originally Posted by RShea View Post
    If you are only replacing your equipment every 7 to 9 years, I'd go wifi6 now for anything you do. Also if you have lathe and plaster- that is one of the worst materials for killing wifi (but below a wall with a wire mesh and plaster or full metal building and getting any wifi outside of that building. )
    Did you miss the part about me being cheap?

    Maybe you can make a compelling case, but it seems that the current argument for wifi6 is having a congested wifi environment, which I donít have. There are at most 8 wifi devices (which would mean my wife and I are on the phone, work computers, TV, tablet and personal computers all at the same time) in my house and I donít see it getting higher anytime soon. (Iím not a ďsmart houseĒ person).

  8. #33
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Beautiful BC
    Posts
    2,886
    I have an ASUS AC-1750 router connected to a cable modem and the WiFi didn't reach the other end of the house. I pulled some CAT5 through the attic, added a spare LinkSys router (with Tomato software), set it up in bridge mode, used the same SSID and password and changed the default radio channel. Works great. In bridge mode the second router acts like a switch and simple passes along packets. The Asus router handles all the processing.
    If you have a problem & think that someone else is going to solve it for you then you have two problems.

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