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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
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    19

    Need some info on base repai

    Hey mags, like the title says i need some advice on base repair on my skis. The base material of the skis is starting to delaminate. What do you think would be the best way to fix this? Maybe use some epoxy in the gap and clamp the crap out of it? Any info would be greatly appreciated.

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    Last edited by m1b8ac; 09-11-2021 at 05:52 PM. Reason: Need advice for base repair

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    6,635
    Root canal??

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Your instinct toward epoxy and clamp is correct. What you wanna do is get pre-cut base material, a stencil to match, and the appropriate cutting tool. You cut out the semicircle part of the stencil while it's clamped to the ski, then epoxy in the semicircle of the precut stuff. Might wanna cut away and screw in new edge too. Finish with a base grind if you think it's necessary (gets everything smoove).
    Check somewhere like tognar.com for supplies and instructions.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Dystopia
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    You’ve got a cracked edge, compression, and base delam.
    Good luck. Skis are toast.

    But have at it. Might as well enjoy learning repair.
    “I’m a subhuman jizz monkey”

    Thx mods. It’s an awesome signature.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2021
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    45
    And what looks like rust and rot to boot. I can see daylight through the sidewall (or what's left of it!).

    This is why you dry your skis and don't wait on the epoxy and ptex.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    2,484
    All the info you need to fix this is already here. Google 'Fix your own fucking edge compression' thread. It's a good place to start.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2010
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    Don't waste your time. Broken edge, trashed sidewall, rotten core.

  8. #8
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    Personally, I think it can be fixed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    1,368
    with the broken edge, it is going to be tough - that ski always will allow moisture in -

    but also as a couple of the other guys state, you can work on it, and see how long you can extend the life of the ski
    ( you will have a better idea the extent of the damage when you cut-out that bubble of damaged base. If there is extensive core rot, you may want to retire the skis... )

    Good luck ! skiJ

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Plenty of broken/cracked edges have been repaired(used to be able to buy 'cracked' edges as a feature).
    Yes, the crack in the edge is the one area you will never be able to seal. Which is why you should always try to preserve the damaged edge first. Edge replacement will leave you with 2 'cracked' edges.
    It's really hard to tell damage from a pic. It's going to look a lot different when filleted open. Could be simple, might be a bitch, might plain and simple not be worth fixing, whether through damage or the skis themselves aren't worth it.
    Examples of repaired blown edgesClick image for larger version. 

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  11. #11
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    Spend those 5 hours clocking some overtime and buy another pair of the same skis . . .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Well you buy those disposocore skis from Blizzard, so you're used to buying new skis every year

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    819
    Quote Originally Posted by gregL View Post
    Spend those 5 hours clocking some overtime and buy another pair of the same skis . . .
    Not withstanding Tuco's dig at GregL - I agree with GregL.

    I've repaired that kind of stuff myself - though the edges were intact. (I used a ptex iron, base and metal-grip, instead of pre-cut base material, and kept the cut-out as minimal as possible.)

    Plusses for doing the repair:
    I learned a lot, was a lot less afraid of getting my hands dirty fixing something too. (I probably ski more recklessly around rocks etc as a result. I'm not sure if that's a good thing or not, though.) It was interesting. Good learning.

    Minuses:
    It sucks up a ton of time. And you still have potentially damaged skis. (If the repair wasn't adequate, or the damage to the core is worse than you know etc.)

    So, if learning, and doing something interesting is your goal, then it's probably worth it. You might end up with some sound skis, additional knowledge and a good story. But you might end up with nothing, after having spent the time and effort, and costs in tools etc. (And a sucky story to boot.) But your goal was to learn, so at least you got that.

    But if you're just hoping to save $200-300 by not having to buy another pair of skis? Well, I think it's a really bad investment, unless money is super tight. (Besides you're going to end up buying tools and supplies.) I'll take on those projects now too, but way more sparingly. From a financial and time perspective, I've got better ways to spend those resources.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for all the responses. I'm usually the type to try to fix things on my own and enjoy the process of learning. However, I realize that in the process I generally spend too much money on tools and supplies to "get the job done right", so my time and money are better spent on other projects. Thanks again for the info mags, and also giving me a more realistic view of the situation.

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  15. #15
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    Mar 2009
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    No special tools needed(most specialized being a Dremel, which I also use for other shit)
    Might take a beginner that's working through the process 5 hrs.
    5 hrs ain't gonna buy a pair of skis(unless you're greg)
    2-300 dollar skis don't replace $800 or custom type skis.
    Each person can decide on circumstances for themselves.
    If it's a pair of skis that aren't worth the effort, then yeah, fuck 'em

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    819
    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    No special tools needed(most specialized being a Dremel, which I also use for other shit)
    Might take a beginner that's working through the process 5 hrs.
    5 hrs ain't gonna buy a pair of skis(unless you're greg)
    2-300 dollar skis don't replace $800 or custom type skis.
    Each person can decide on circumstances for themselves.
    If it's a pair of skis that aren't worth the effort, then yeah, fuck 'em
    Yeah, but think about what you probably do need.

    Epoxy. (Some people have it on hand, but not that many.)
    Pre-cut PTex base (If you're using pre-cut material, you'll also need a cut template, so you can cut out the place your patch goes; +cut-template) or 'tex iron, with melt-able base/metal-grip
    Perhaps those edges are salvageable without any replacement, but if not, edge material.
    Clamps
    Files/metal scraper, sandpaper/etc.
    Dremel+bits/etc,
    Perhaps tiny screws to anchor edge, if needed.

    So, yeah, it's not like those are all big bucks, but if you didn't have many/any of them, and you're just buying for this project, and perhaps not doing it again - well, it adds up. (I'd guess you could be in $100-200 if you didn't have any of that stuff, pretty easily.)
    I had a ton of that stuff already, the first time I did it.
    And what I didn't, and bought, I have continued to use. (e.g. ptex iron) So it had utility to me outside the repair.

    While I enjoyed the experience, it didn't save me any money. And I'd avoid doing it again, unless it was a pair of skis I really wanted that I couldn't find/replace some other cheaper way.

    And dude. I never claimed all skis were $2-300. I'm just saying - that if you thought you'd "fix" a pair of skis to skimp on $300, with damaged/cracked/broken edges, sidewall compression, unknown core-damage - well, that's a pretty risky gamble with a pretty substantial investment in time. If your time is nearly worthless, you already have all the tools, and are willing to gamble, then have at it. (Or if you realize you may end up with *nothing* but some learning and that's ok. then also, go for it.)

  17. #17
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    Park City
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    I’ve fixed a lot of really fucked up skis and I think this would be worth it.

    People under estimate the worth of a good pair of rick skis. A pair of skis you can just say “ fuck it” and straight line through the slag pile to go ski some fun stuff beyond.

    That’s what you’ll be makig here. And the experience and tools to fix your skis on the future.

    Totally worth it.

    Some of my favorite rock skis came from the dumpster. Talk about opening up terrain options at the great divide back in the day


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    I rip the groomed on tele gear

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregorys View Post
    Yeah, but think about what you probably do need.

    Epoxy. (Some people have it on hand, but not that many.)
    Pre-cut PTex base (If you're using pre-cut material, you'll also need a cut template, so you can cut out the place your patch goes; +cut-template) or 'tex iron, with melt-able base/metal-grip
    Perhaps those edges are salvageable without any replacement, but if not, edge material.
    Clamps
    Files/metal scraper, sandpaper/etc.
    Dremel+bits/etc,
    Perhaps tiny screws to anchor edge, if needed.

    So, yeah, it's not like those are all big bucks, but if you didn't have many/any of them, and you're just buying for this project, and perhaps not doing it again - well, it adds up. (I'd guess you could be in $100-200 if you didn't have any of that stuff, pretty easily.)
    I had a ton of that stuff already, the first time I did it.
    And what I didn't, and bought, I have continued to use. (e.g. ptex iron) So it had utility to me outside the repair.

    While I enjoyed the experience, it didn't save me any money. And I'd avoid doing it again, unless it was a pair of skis I really wanted that I couldn't find/replace some other cheaper way.

    And dude. I never claimed all skis were $2-300. I'm just saying - that if you thought you'd "fix" a pair of skis to skimp on $300, with damaged/cracked/broken edges, sidewall compression, unknown core-damage - well, that's a pretty risky gamble with a pretty substantial investment in time. If your time is nearly worthless, you already have all the tools, and are willing to gamble, then have at it. (Or if you realize you may end up with *nothing* but some learning and that's ok. then also, go for it.)
    I mean I get it but
    Epoxy is a multi use item. I'd personally still have some on hand even if I didn't ski
    Just buy some damn base material and don't screw w/ precut shit. I know I will continue to hit ricks as long as I ski
    No template needed man straight edge, sharpie and a combination square(shit I'd already have)- boom, ready to cut shit
    A weld will not work here(if you were familiar w/ these kind of repairs, you'd already know this)
    No need for edge material in this instance. Can pretty much guarantee you that from pics.
    The stuff you mentioned after is multi purpose and I'd personally own anyway
    Those edge screws are ridiculous. Never used 'em
    Never claimed you said "all" skis were 2-3hundo. And yeah, if the dude has 0 tools n shit and will never use again probably not worth it. That's up to each user and should really just be common sense. But reality is, none of the tools required are ski repair specific, meaning you do not have to buy 'special' tools.
    Just clarifying circumstances may indicate your course of action(like that pair of Spats Plat it Leo raised from the dead). I mean, I'm not advocating he repair a pair of Dynastar 6th sense ffs. I think I stated pretty early on that the kind of skis is a determinate.
    And I think you're wrong on the last part(except the learning part)
    Last edited by tuco; 09-15-2021 at 05:58 AM.

  19. #19
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    Jan 2008
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    Any serious skier should have the tools to do this kind of base repair--the money spent on purchasing them will be spread out of multiple repairs.

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