Page 15 of 29 FirstFirst ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... LastLast
Results 351 to 375 of 711
  1. #351
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8,147
    Depends.

    Also, if more than 5 individuals sans residence, bet yer sweet, sweet ass they be latherin' up.

  2. #352
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post

    Existing infrastructure:

    This is the intransigence I’m talking about. Close down every tenth block and make them greenways except for pizza delivery traffic.

    You mean like the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto?
    "No no! We'll just ask them nicely to move off of our green space. And of course they'll happily go find someplace else to locate their homes and businesses, so that America can be more like Frisia."
    Even the bike shops?



    Watch as walking and biking explodes because people feel safer and there’s less noise.
    It won't be because they're unemployed and homeless after you closed their homes and businesses down to make room for your greenspaces?
    Oh that's right! They can just build new houses outside the cities and have their businesses online. Brilliant!



    Plowing can be done with a quad rather than a giant truck.
    Just like Canada!



    Bikes and pedals don’t tear up roads like cars and trucks so very limited ongoing maintenance costs. Save money on your existing roads because more people are walking and riding

    Incentivize businesses to offer bike lockers and showers for commuters.

    Can't we just decimate the part of the population that carries the genes for extreme stank? Kill 2 birds [and 10% of the population] with that move. Lots more room to explore the possibilities of those tall downhill gears...

  3. #353
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    5,242
    Van

    https://bikehub.ca/about-us/hub-cycling

    HUB Cycling

    HUB Cycling is a charitable not-for-profit organization that has spent over 20 years removing barriers to cycling in Metro Vancouver, while cultivating the health, environmental, and economic benefits that active transportation can bring. HUB has educated thousands of people, motivated thousands more, and championed improvements such as #UnGapTheMap to create a connected cycling networkÖ.

    More cycling means healthier, happier, more connected communities. Weíre leading the way in making cycling an attractive choice for everyone.

  4. #354
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    What a bunch of assholes

    While en route to help Bird, Todaro said his patrol vehicle’s emergency lights were on yet the sirens were off. Cyclists would not yield, the deputy said, making his trip more burdensome.“The public needs to know they need to get out of the way for emergency vehicles,” he said. “I shut the siren off because we don’t want to blow anybody’s ear out because we don’t want to cause a bike crash on the way to a bike crash.”
    One cyclist admonished him because she believed she had the right of way, he said. All told, about 100 cyclists on the road didn’t yield, he said.
    “Not a single bike pulled over,” he said.

    Par for the course for road bikers...
    And I love how road biking Mags jumped in to defend, diffuse, and minimize - 'How can they be expected to know there was an any one behind them as they wobble up the middle of the paved Colorado Route 13?'

    Name:  Maroon-Creek-Road-Aspen.jpg
Views: 208
Size:  200.5 KB

    ...'Oh it was obviously a tour group of newbs!' Oh yeah, a bunch of fat women paying $$ to ride road bikes 9 miles up a hill at 10,000' elevation... hahahaha I bet they were burnin' it on their way to run the 4 Pass Loop while they had a free afternoon...

    Nobody ever said it was one group of typical road bikers. What they did say was: Not One Road Biker Pulled Over To Let An Emergency Vehicle With Flashing Lights Pass


  5. #355
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    closer
    Posts
    4,610
    Highangle is on a roll today. He'll Show them gay Dutch transvestite roadbikers what a real frontier spirit is! They ain't gonna get his roads! And I like that you shouldn't build showering facilities because they attract homeless people. Remembering Anchorage: That's also his argument against public transportation..I guess.

    He reminds me of the bearded camouflage guy standing on his pickup truck, automatic rifle in hand ( sorry no idea about what it was as I'm a communist Euro without riflian knowledge) next to a bridge when we* drove up to hatchers pass guarding the real Alaska from the wimps and posers.

    *Not the actual we, but The Swiss guy we met up at hatchers pass whose Alaskan friends told him he doesn't have to stop because that " is just some random guy guarding Alaska..he's there quite often".
    It's a war of the mind and we're armed to the teeth.

  6. #356
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    It's Hatcher Pass, touron.

    Hope your Swiss confrere got some nice pics from the parking area.

    Name:  9167d24c8e51c222b0900cb9dcdbc7edd70c9662.png
Views: 178
Size:  348.7 KB

  7. #357
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    closer
    Posts
    4,610
    Hasn't it been renamed: happy road bikers recreational park?
    It's a war of the mind and we're armed to the teeth.

  8. #358
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    关你屁事
    Posts
    8,140
    Oh dear real Alaska has been californicated and the Sierra pedantry has reached Hatcher Pass

  9. #359
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by subtle plague View Post
    Hasn't it been renamed: happy road bikers recreational park?
    Way too much gravel for road bikers.

  10. #360
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Edge of the Great Basin
    Posts
    4,367
    Phew, fortunately gravel bikes aren't a thing!

  11. #361
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    Oh dear real Alaska has been californicated and the Sierra pedantry has reached Hatcher Pass
    Stood in line the other night to eat at The Goat Place. Our waiter had a gelled Macklemore undercut and a long combed beard, the combination of which prob takes him over an hour to do up every day before he leaves the house. I had the potato and leek pizza and a Snow Goose hefe. It felt too much like California, until the check arrived and it was under $100.
    Badoom tishhh

  12. #362
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by MultiVerse View Post
    Phew, fortunately gravel bikes aren't a thing!
    Neither are glacier bikes, thank fuck.

  13. #363
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    12,364
    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    Way too much gravel for road bikers.
    I ride my road bike all over gravel roads.

    Iím still waiting for your reply on your subsidized Last Frontier lifestyle. I mean youíre the one who brought up government subsidizing lifestyle. Iím waiting impatiently.

    Youíre like the mtu of this thread. Thereís no substance.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  14. #364
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    关你屁事
    Posts
    8,140
    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    Stood in line the other night to eat at The Goat Place. Our waiter had a gelled Macklemore undercut and a long combed beard, the combination of which prob takes him over an hour to do up every day before he leaves the house. I had the potato and leek pizza and a Snow Goose hefe. It felt too much like California, until the check arrived and it was under $100.
    Badoom tishhh
    that sounds like a joke a transplant local in Alaska/Idaho/Montana/Wyoming tells the newer transplant locals.

  15. #365
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    I ride my road bike all over gravel roads.
    But you're a well-known idiot, though.



    I’m still waiting for your reply on your subsidized Last Frontier lifestyle. I mean you’re the one who brought up government subsidizing lifestyle. I’m waiting impatiently.
    My lifestyle, such as it is, is subsidized by my various business enterprises. I'm currently taking a week off my fitness routine to fatten up and let my metatarsalgia and IT bands rest before I go a half hour up the road to hunt one of the full curl Dall rams I found back in May. They say Kenai Mountains sheep is the hardest hunt in Alaska, and if you count the last few weeks I've spent cutting secret trails up through the alders to the high country hellscape, it's already living up to the rep.

    Inre razing our cities to make bike paths and greenspaces road bikers won't use: Asinine. Who's going to handle the refugees? You know, all those people and businesses you'll gladly remove and use the iron boot of eminent domain on to make greenspaces for road bikers to sneer at? I think it's probably going to require a suspension of posse comitatus so the military can handle it.

    Moreover, those greenspaces need to be along major roads, so serious road bikers can get their miles in a minimum of time between their VO2 stress tests and testosterone supplementation. It will also dis-employ a bunch of people when you displace those prime business locations along major thoroughfares. What do you think about the government employing all those people to make road bikes for the masses? You know, mining the titanium and magnesium, formulating the polymers, tensioning spokes...Sure beats keeping them in camps under bridges on the government dole, amirite?



    You’re like the mtu of this thread. There’s no substance.

    Good thing you're here to add mass. This thread would likely have vanished in the breeze were it not for the sheer weight of your perfervid concupiscent perceptions.

  16. #366
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,041
    When I was commuting South Station -> Seaport/Dorchester in Boston, using a bike share (I guess it's Blue Bikes these days) to ride was just as fast as the Silver Line, and the path on the water around the city is a beautiful ride. It was definitely doable year round. Cold in the winter? Bring gloves. In the summer? Don't pedal wicked hard. I mean, I've sweated way more riding the Red Line than I have coasting past the ICA on a bike. The last time I was in NYC, I rode back from the bars to the hotel on a Citi Bike using the new(ish?) separated bike lane. I preferred it to the taxi/hot summer subway experience.

    I stopped riding on the road for exercise partially because mtb trails are more fun, and partially because I got tired of aggro drivers. I was sitting in my car waiting to turn right on red in MA, and got rear-ended by somebody looking left (not where they were going) so they could treat right on red as a merge, instead of a stop. There's a pedestrian crossing there, next to a school. Tried commuting by bike on the roads around Louisville, CO back in the 2000s, but it wasn't worth it. Took the left lane to turn left, only to have a car pass me on the right, then turn left into my lane and slam the brakes on to take the same left I was going to take. I locked up both wheels, almost ate trunk.

    We have a separated bike/ped path where live now. It's great, the kids can explore and got to the store on their own without being on a road. We just got bike boxes painted at intersections here now to provide a clear space where cyclists can move from the bike lane to the middle at a stop. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-...ts/bike-boxes/

    To me, the investment in bike/ped infrastructure is clearly worth it. It's like public transportation in that most communities will get there eventually, so why not have the vision to do it, as opposed to waiting until it should have been done 20yrs ago. Our town has 1k+ residential building permits in the process of being built, so let's get more residents on bikes and reduce traffic.

  17. #367
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Geopolis
    Posts
    14,002
    Quote Originally Posted by 365wp View Post
    When I was commuting South Station -> Seaport/Dorchester in Boston, using a bike share (I guess it's Blue Bikes these days) to ride was just as fast as the Silver Line, and the path on the water around the city is a beautiful ride. It was definitely doable year round. Cold in the winter? Bring gloves. In the summer? Don't pedal wicked hard. I mean, I've sweated way more riding the Red Line than I have coasting past the ICA on a bike. The last time I was in NYC, I rode back from the bars to the hotel on a Citi Bike using the new(ish?) separated bike lane. I preferred it to the taxi/hot summer subway experience.

    I stopped riding on the road for exercise partially because mtb trails are more fun, and partially because I got tired of aggro drivers. I was sitting in my car waiting to turn right on red in MA, and got rear-ended by somebody looking left (not where they were going) so they could treat right on red as a merge, instead of a stop. There's a pedestrian crossing there, next to a school. Tried commuting by bike on the roads around Louisville, CO back in the 2000s, but it wasn't worth it. Took the left lane to turn left, only to have a car pass me on the right, then turn left into my lane and slam the brakes on to take the same left I was going to take. I locked up both wheels, almost ate trunk.

    We have a separated bike/ped path where live now. It's great, the kids can explore and got to the store on their own without being on a road. We just got bike boxes painted at intersections here now to provide a clear space where cyclists can move from the bike lane to the middle at a stop. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-...ts/bike-boxes/

    To me, the investment in bike/ped infrastructure is clearly worth it. It's like public transportation in that most communities will get there eventually, so why not have the vision to do it, as opposed to waiting until it should have been done 20yrs ago. Our town has 1k+ residential building permits in the process of being built, so let's get more residents on bikes and reduce traffic.
    The only counterarguments are from people like Dexter who point out that some people will [spoiler alert] break the rules.

    But yeah, +1.
    j'ai des grands instants de lucididididididididi

  18. #368
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    5,242
    MassBike: https://www.massbike.org

    MassBike advocates for policies that encourage and support community wellness, equity, and inclusion, enable sustainable growth, drive economic vitality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    MassBikeís Vision for the Future

    Bicycling in Massachusetts is a safe, respected, convenient, and enjoyable way to get around. Roads throughout the state are safe and welcoming for cyclists, and all users interact in a courteous and legal manner. Car-free pathways connect our communities, bicycles are fully integrated into our public transportation system, and secure bike parking is located where people need it. People of all kinds and means choose to bicycle for life, work, and play.

  19. #369
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    closer
    Posts
    4,610
    Quote Originally Posted by 365wp View Post
    When I was commuting South Station -> Seaport/Dorchester in Boston, using a bike share (I guess it's Blue Bikes these days) to ride was just as fast as the Silver Line, and the path on the water around the city is a beautiful ride. It was definitely doable year round. Cold in the winter? Bring gloves. In the summer? Don't pedal wicked hard. I mean, I've sweated way more riding the Red Line than I have coasting past the ICA on a bike. The last time I was in NYC, I rode back from the bars to the hotel on a Citi Bike using the new(ish?) separated bike lane. I preferred it to the taxi/hot summer subway experience.

    I stopped riding on the road for exercise partially because mtb trails are more fun, and partially because I got tired of aggro drivers. I was sitting in my car waiting to turn right on red in MA, and got rear-ended by somebody looking left (not where they were going) so they could treat right on red as a merge, instead of a stop. There's a pedestrian crossing there, next to a school. Tried commuting by bike on the roads around Louisville, CO back in the 2000s, but it wasn't worth it. Took the left lane to turn left, only to have a car pass me on the right, then turn left into my lane and slam the brakes on to take the same left I was going to take. I locked up both wheels, almost ate trunk.

    We have a separated bike/ped path where live now. It's great, the kids can explore and got to the store on their own without being on a road. We just got bike boxes painted at intersections here now to provide a clear space where cyclists can move from the bike lane to the middle at a stop. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-...ts/bike-boxes/

    To me, the investment in bike/ped infrastructure is clearly worth it. It's like public transportation in that most communities will get there eventually, so why not have the vision to do it, as opposed to waiting until it should have been done 20yrs ago. Our town has 1k+ residential building permits in the process of being built, so let's get more residents on bikes and reduce traffic.
    Highangle hates you, City boy. When he comes back from his rugged mountain existence hunting Alaskan death snails on foot he'll run you over in his lifted truck because you displace businesses.
    It's a war of the mind and we're armed to the teeth.

  20. #370
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Access to Granlibakken
    Posts
    10,283
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    The BO thing is a red herring. Have you ever waited in a subway station in Manhattan in the summer? That's sweatier than I would get biking in to work in Portland, and I never heard that people thought it was necessary to grab a shower once you get off the subway train.
    I donít live in a city or commute, but my impression is that a shitload of ebikes are purchased to enable sweat-free commutes.

  21. #371
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    12,364
    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    But you're a well-known idiot, though.





    My lifestyle, such as it is, is subsidized by my various business enterprises. I'm currently taking a week off my fitness routine to fatten up and let my metatarsalgia and IT bands rest before I go a half hour up the road to hunt one of the full curl Dall rams I found back in May. They say Kenai Mountains sheep is the hardest hunt in Alaska, and if you count the last few weeks I've spent cutting secret trails up through the alders to the high country hellscape, it's already living up to the rep.

    Inre razing our cities to make bike paths and greenspaces road bikers won't use: Asinine. Who's going to handle the refugees? You know, all those people and businesses you'll gladly remove and use the iron boot of eminent domain on to make greenspaces for road bikers to sneer at? I think it's probably going to require a suspension of posse comitatus so the military can handle it.

    Moreover, those greenspaces need to be along major roads, so serious road bikers can get their miles in a minimum of time between their VO2 stress tests and testosterone supplementation. It will also dis-employ a bunch of people when you displace those prime business locations along major thoroughfares. What do you think about the government employing all those people to make road bikes for the masses? You know, mining the titanium and magnesium, formulating the polymers, tensioning spokes...Sure beats keeping them in camps under bridges on the government dole, amirite?






    Good thing you're here to add mass. This thread would likely have vanished in the breeze were it not for the sheer weight of your perfervid concupiscent perceptions.
    You would not be able to live in AK if there werenít government subsidies. Youíre railing about such things.

    Itís ironic isnít it? Such a rugged individual


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  22. #372
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Bellevue
    Posts
    7,366
    This thread is a shit show.
    Quote Originally Posted by dunfree View Post
    that sounds like a joke a transplant local in Alaska/Idaho/Montana/Wyoming tells the newer transplant locals.
    Ha. Was this too on the nose for an angry response?
    Quote Originally Posted by frorider View Post
    I donít live in a city or commute, but my impression is that a shitload of ebikes are purchased to enable sweat-free commutes.
    I've considered one for that purpose but haven't actually ridden one to see how they feel. A little hill assist would be nice

  23. #373
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    1,217
    Quote Originally Posted by 365wp View Post
    When I was commuting South Station -> Seaport/Dorchester in Boston, using a bike share (I guess it's Blue Bikes these days) to ride was just as fast as the Silver Line, and the path on the water around the city is a beautiful ride. It was definitely doable year round. Cold in the winter? Bring gloves. In the summer? Don't pedal wicked hard. I mean, I've sweated way more riding the Red Line than I have coasting past the ICA on a bike. The last time I was in NYC, I rode back from the bars to the hotel on a Citi Bike using the new(ish?) separated bike lane. I preferred it to the taxi/hot summer subway experience.

    I stopped riding on the road for exercise partially because mtb trails are more fun, and partially because I got tired of aggro drivers. I was sitting in my car waiting to turn right on red in MA, and got rear-ended by somebody looking left (not where they were going) so they could treat right on red as a merge, instead of a stop. There's a pedestrian crossing there, next to a school. Tried commuting by bike on the roads around Louisville, CO back in the 2000s, but it wasn't worth it. Took the left lane to turn left, only to have a car pass me on the right, then turn left into my lane and slam the brakes on to take the same left I was going to take. I locked up both wheels, almost ate trunk.

    We have a separated bike/ped path where live now. It's great, the kids can explore and got to the store on their own without being on a road. We just got bike boxes painted at intersections here now to provide a clear space where cyclists can move from the bike lane to the middle at a stop. https://nacto.org/publication/urban-...ts/bike-boxes/

    To me, the investment in bike/ped infrastructure is clearly worth it. It's like public transportation in that most communities will get there eventually, so why not have the vision to do it, as opposed to waiting until it should have been done 20yrs ago. Our town has 1k+ residential building permits in the process of being built, so let's get more residents on bikes and reduce traffic.
    How many firebombs did this take?

  24. #374
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,913
    Quote Originally Posted by frorider View Post
    I don’t live in a city or commute, but my impression is that a shitload of ebikes are purchased to enable sweat-free commutes.
    Around here, they are used by the elderly to enjoy the great outdoors. Or by the soccer moms to take the kids to the local veggie and fruit stand to get veggies and fruit. I regularly get passed by both types of ebike owners on steeper roads. Although, sometimes on rare occasions when I have good legs, it's the other way around.
    "We don't beat the reaper by living longer, we beat the reaper by living well and living fully." - Randy Pausch

  25. #375
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    907
    Posts
    14,832
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    You would not be able to live in AK if there weren’t government subsidies. You’re railing about such things.

    It’s ironic isn’t it? Such a rugged individual


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

    I suspect I would, since I built my home, fed and educated my family, and started my professional practice and real estate empire with the proceeds from my successful commercial fishing operation.
    I pay more taxes than a thousand of you, and if it ever came down to it, I could make it as a fucking seal hunter or street busker or novelist or goddamn bond trader or Fuller brush salesman.

    But that's not why I'm a leading citizen in a town full of amazing and awesome people. No, the real reason is because I ride on the fucking bike paths whenever possible.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •