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Thread: Tool Time

  1. #276
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    Tool Time

    Any ratchet spinners in that collection?
    I’m in love with my Nepros 1/4” Quick Spinner Adapters.
    I have a 1/4” ratchet set up with:
    3mm
    4mm
    5mm
    6mm
    T25
    All setup with a Nepros quick ratchet.

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    For reducers I have theses KTC:
    1/4” female to 3/8” male
    3/8” female to 1/2” male.
    These live in my travel kit because I don’t carry a 1/2 in ratchet, and I have a few 1/2” bb tools in that kit.
    They also work as a thumb ratchet, but not as nice as the Nepros branded ones.

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  2. #277
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    some mechanic told me that there were certain places a snap-on tool would just fit where other tools would not, but they are expensive so I always went for Craftsman, except of course for the free snap-on from the mother corp

    I had a neighbor who sold Snap-on for a couple years a good guy, he said it was a tough gig and he almost made it but he had to go back to pulling wrenches, less stress & hassle
    Last edited by XXX-er; 06-28-2022 at 10:30 AM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  3. #278
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    OK, which of you f'ers do I send the bill for inspired tool purchases to? I wanted to get a set of hex wrenches to go in the bike toolbox, thought the Wera ones looked nice, and ended up also ordering the security torx L-wrenches that were on the same Amazon listing, because I didn't have any security torx bits in the toolbox when I wanted one last week.

  4. #279
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    Good stuff, thanks! I came across the Mac Tools one after posting but not the others. I think I'll give the Mac Tools a try since they have a couple different lengths.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    Anyways, I do have a full set of these and I think they pretty much do what your are trying to do, but as dedicated drivers:
    Attachment 420130
    I do like those, but don't want dedicated drivers for everything. I don't have the space or desire for a massive rack of drivers like you have (both a preference, and for portability).

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    For socket extensions, I like them to be as low profile as possible, as clearance is usually an issue when you need one.
    ...
    I like the Snapon ones as they have a dual engagement tip.
    So there are two reasons to use an extender. 1) you need the extra length because of clearance, in which case yes low profile is good. 2) for ergonomics. I very, very frequently use medium to long extensions just to get the tool to a more comfortable working position. It also gives me something to grab with my other hand to brace from when breaking loose or torqueing something down, and something to spin the screw off once broken loose (hence wanting a spinner handle). I rarely DON'T use an extension.

    I have some cheap Companion extensions just like those Snap Ons with the dual engagement wobble/rigid tip, but they also have knurling on the shaft which is nice. Surprisingly, they have held up fine to a LOT of use and abuse. My guess is that they are not quite as rigid as the expensive ones when in the "rigid" mode but I have a variety of standard ones laying around too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    I’m in love with my Nepros 1/4” Quick Spinner Adapters.
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    Hadn't seen these before, will have to try a couple!

  5. #280
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherVTskibum View Post
    OK, which of you f'ers do I send the bill for inspired tool purchases to?
    Duh, PM Rontel your invoice.

  6. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Duh, PM Rontel your invoice.
    Excellent.

    My mom just texted me a photo of my dads tool box. Terrible. So he’s getting some stuff for his birthday: wiha drivers, knipex, some hex keys, drill bits.

    Spread the love. PM Rontele the invoice.

    Even funnier, my phone correctly autocorrects to the right Rontele spelling.

  7. #282
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Any ratchet spinners in that collection?
    I’m in love with my Nepros 1/4” Quick Spinner Adapters.

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    Negative... I have been thinking about adding them, but waiting until I talk myself into ordering more Nerpor's stuff. How are their Torx and Hex sockets holding up? I really wish Nepro's made SAE Hex, as I'd probably pick a set of those up as I am not in love with the Snapon ones, at least compared to my PB Swiss sockets.

    You REALLY need to invest in the NEPROS ratchets the Long compact ¼ drive and the ⅜ in the long compact ¼ drive body are my absolute favorites. I always grab them over the Snapon ones. EVERYTHING about them is BETTER than Snapon.

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    L to R Snaoon Zero with the spraug clutch, Snapon Dual80 ¼ drive, Nepros compact ¼, Nepros Long compact ¼, Nepros Long compact ⅜, Snapon ⅜ Dual 80
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    The Nepros have way slimmer heads than the Snapon.
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    The Nepros are also significantly thinner. Not to mention the Nepros have higher engagement (90 tooth) Snapon Dual 80 are 80 tooth, but only 72 tooth in ¼ drive, Plus Nepros have better backdrag than Snapon as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    some mechanic told me that there were certain places a snap-on tool would just fit where other tools would not, but they are expensive so I always went for Craftsman, except of course for the free snap-on from the mother corp
    This is very true. They fit in a lot of places where nothing else will, both with their thin walls and compact size, but also in that they have better tolerances for a tighter fit on the fastners. For fasteners in good shape, nothing fits as well as their Flankdrive plus, but those tolerances are so tight, on old rusted crap, they wont fit, so I have their standard sockets in a mid length for those times.

    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    Good stuff, thanks! I came across the Mac Tools one after posting but not the others. I think I'll give the Mac Tools a try since they have a couple different lengths.



    I do like those, but don't want dedicated drivers for everything. I don't have the space or desire for a massive rack of drivers like you have (both a preference, and for portability).



    So there are two reasons to use an extender. 1) you need the extra length because of clearance, in which case yes low profile is good. 2) for ergonomics. I very, very frequently use medium to long extensions just to get the tool to a more comfortable working position. It also gives me something to grab with my other hand to brace from when breaking loose or torqueing something down, and something to spin the screw off once broken loose (hence wanting a spinner handle). I rarely DON'T use an extension.

    I have some cheap Companion extensions just like those Snap Ons with the dual engagement wobble/rigid tip, but they also have knurling on the shaft which is nice. Surprisingly, they have held up fine to a LOT of use and abuse. My guess is that they are not quite as rigid as the expensive ones when in the "rigid" mode but I have a variety of standard ones laying around too.
    MAC generally has good tools but, the majority of it is rebranded stuff, so its worth shopping around to see if their is an OEM for many of their tools.

    I like dedicated tools, as it saves me a bunch of time switching back and forth. Thats also why I own so many ratchets. Before I start a project, I tend to select all of the sockets I need for a project and set each one up on its own ratchet / Torque wrench. That saves a ton of time.

    I agree with using a extension, which is why I haver a full set of each size from very short to very long, and yes the knurling is quite nice too!

    What I have found with the Snapon extensions is that the sockets dont easily fall off when you are reaching into some hard to reach place. Have had that happen way too many times with the cheaper ones, and its always a huge time suck as its usually a pain in the ass to retrieve said socket and then start over.

  8. #283
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    I have a craftsmen ratchet found under the radiator of a 63 chev PU, it was a solid chunk of rust so I took it to sears and told the lady it had stopped working, i was hoping for a new one but instead she hands me a rebuild kit.

    I got all the rust off with naval jelly but the ends of the snap ring were rusted away so no way to get it apart for the rebuild but by turning that cover on the bottom with a hammer & chisel the snapring was exposed & I got the ratchet apart, after the rebuild it still works fine many yars later
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  9. #284
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    Oh shit, talking POE on ratchets. Does the sprag clutch have the "soft engagement" I love on my Onyx hubs?

  10. #285
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHerm View Post
    Oh shit, talking POE on ratchets. Does the sprag clutch have the "soft engagement" I love on my Onyx hubs?
    I wouldn't call it soft, but its also a ratchet that I dont use for high-torque applications either. It is great for confined spaces!

  11. #286
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    Tool Time

    One of the things I have found that helps keep my shop clean and organized is everything has its place. I have found that for certain tools, Systainers make a lot of sense. They are kind of like mini job specific tool boxes that stack together. They are especially great for bulky tools such as wood working power tools and the modular nature lets you take all the tools you need with you to the work task at hand.
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    I have been slowly transitioning everything that doesnt live in one of my tool chests to systainers.
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    At some point I plan to build new custom cabinets to fit all of the systainers, but at least they stack well.

    Today I ended up organizing a few more.
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    This is my Brady label maker. Unlike the P-touch and other brands you tell it exactly how long to make the labels so it waists little consumables. Plus you can even label heat shrink for wires, and they make waterproof labels that are ideal for suspension settings on bikes

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    This one is for my Iwata LPH80 spray gun. It does an amazing job and is efficient enough it will work off of my little makkita air compressor and works well on everything from bike frames to the large lathe I have been painting.

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    This one is for trimming cabinate trim.

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    This one is for my small trim router.

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    And this one is for my electrical meters.

    I’m thinking I might use a larger layered systainer as a portable tool box for bike trips. Just gotta figure out what size will be most ideal.

  12. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
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    This one is for my Iwata LPH80 spray gun. It does an amazing job and is efficient enough it will work off of my little makkita air compressor and works well on everything from bike frames to the large lathe I have been painting.
    What about when Iwata releases the LPH81?

    I'm impressed but also left a bit shellshocked. That's a very intricate system you've got.

  13. #288
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    What about when Iwata releases the LPH81?

    I'm impressed but also left a bit shellshocked. That's a very intricate system you've got.
    No desire or need to “upgrade” the LPH80 does everything I need out of it and it does it very well. Buy once Cry once doesn’t work if you constantly upgrade to each new version.

  14. #289
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    Tool Time

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    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  15. #290
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
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    Now that’s a cheater bar. The open end wrench is cute too.

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    Williams (Snapon industrial) ¾ drive breaker bar with interchangeable heads.

    Add a steel pipe in this case jack handle and you can break just about any bolt.

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    That being said with a proper impact gun, I haven’t had to use the big breaker bar in a while last time was a ⅝ hex bolt on the Kurt vise on my mill.

  16. #291
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    Thoughts on a set of Vessel megadora 900 or 980 impacta for JIS/phillips? I just received a single #2 900 to check out and it feels pretty nice in the hand. A little shorter and smoother grip than I was expecting.

    I’m considering those in #1, 2, and 3. And a set of the hollow tip PB for slotted.

    Alternative would be a PB set which includes a #1 and 2 phillips with the slotted drivers. Or a set of Wiha micro finish in both slotted and phillips.

    This will be for general everyday garage and house use. Examples: moto and small engine carburetors, door and drawer hardware, electronics, kids toys, etc.

  17. #292
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    Tool Time

    Personally, after all my research , I think wiha are arguably the best drivers and inarguably the best value of the 4 best drivers brands (pb swiss, wiha, wera, vessel - and Klein if you want to make it 5).

    Fwiw.

  18. #293
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    Quote Originally Posted by g_man80 View Post
    Thoughts on a set of Vessel megadora 900 or 980 impacta for JIS/phillips? I just received a single #2 900 to check out and it feels pretty nice in the hand. A little shorter and smoother grip than I was expecting.

    I’m considering those in #1, 2, and 3. And a set of the hollow tip PB for slotted.

    Alternative would be a PB set which includes a #1 and 2 phillips with the slotted drivers. Or a set of Wiha micro finish in both slotted and phillips.

    This will be for general everyday garage and house use. Examples: moto and small engine carburetors, door and drawer hardware, electronics, kids toys, etc.
    The 980 is a bit heavier than the 900 as it has a though shank and striking cap, making it a bit more heavy duty. They are very good for Phillips / JIS. Most people do not use a #3 Phillips at all. So you could get by with just a #1 and #2, a #3 pozidrive is what you want for ski bindings. Unless you work with a lot of euro furniture and its screws, chances are you dont need pozidrive in the rest of the sizes. The exception is some industrial electronics also use Posidrive, but its very rare. Especially in NA

    PBSwiss is by far the best for flats. The #1~#5 will cover 99% of what you will ever see in flat drive. I really like their "Swiss grip" handles, so I would really recommend that series over the multi craft and I would avoid the classic (I hate the feel of those)

    My advice, is order the PBSwiss flats first, and see how you like them. Then decide if you want to go with them, Vessel or Wiha for Philips.

    As I have said before, PBSwiss is also excellent for Hex and Torx as well... not to say that their Phillips are not extremely good, its just that the. Flat, hex and Torx is what sets them apart from the competition.

    Also, if you want an impact set, this set from PBSwiss covers the most used flats and Phillips. This standard Swissgrip set, is everything you need for 99% of what you will ever come across is flat and Phillips, and none of the stuff you will probably never use. For $68 its what I would do.

  19. #294
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    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    Personally, after all my research , I think wiha are arguably the best drivers and inarguably the best value of the 4 best drivers brands (pb swiss, wiha, wera, vessel - and Klein if you want to make it 5).

    Fwiw.
    I dont think you can go wrong with any of these after having owned versions of all of them, with the exception of Klien. They are garbage compared to the rest of those. In fact I'd put Klien as only slightly better than most generic hardware store brands. The exception is in Robertson drive, wich I think Klien is about the only option, but who uses that crap outside of Canuckistan and Electricians?

  20. #295
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    In the spirit of "buy something good to last a lifetime", what's a good brand for a small arbor press? It just needs to be big enough to press in/out bearings/bushings in suspension etc. I've always used my table top vise to do it so far, but the cloverleaf pattern of an arbor press is better in some scenarios. Looks like there's a few 1/2 ton ones for like $65-75 or so from Home Depot, McMaster-Carr, etc., and prices climb dramatically beyond that for way more capacity than I need.

  21. #296
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    I dont think you can go wrong with any of these after having owned versions of all of them, with the exception of Klien. They are garbage compared to the rest of those. In fact I'd put Klien as only slightly better than most generic hardware store brands. The exception is in Robertson drive, wich I think Klien is about the only option, but who uses that crap outside of Canuckistan and Electricians?
    I’m going to remember this when you are trapped in Canuckistan and my trusty Kleins get you out.

    I am higher on Kleins, and Canuckistan, than you. They make all other American brands look like junk.

    We will see how I like the Wihas when I get back from vacation.

  22. #297
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    In the spirit of "buy something good to last a lifetime", what's a good brand for a small arbor press? It just needs to be big enough to press in/out bearings/bushings in suspension etc. I've always used my table top vise to do it so far, but the cloverleaf pattern of an arbor press is better in some scenarios. Looks like there's a few 1/2 ton ones for like $65-75 or so from Home Depot, McMaster-Carr, etc., and prices climb dramatically beyond that for way more capacity than I need.
    Don’t waist your money on buying a new arbor press. Most are Chinese garbage and are not built anywhere near as good as the old USA iron. Dake , Famco and greenerd are the brands to get, you can probably add Atlas to that list too. Greenerd uses a round ram while the rest use a more preferable square ram.

    These can be found used for literally dollars per pound. So it’s worth keeping an eye out for them used. The same goes for quality vises. I picked up my 6.5” Wilton tradesman for only $75!

    I picked up my #3-½ R Famco for less than a buck per pound.
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    The problem with small arbor presses is they don’t always have adequate throat depth, not that you need one as large as mine. However I have machined an adapter for mine so that it does double duty in the winter as a ski boot punch.

    Things to look for is the throat should have a mechanism to adjust the shaft fit with adjustable shims on both axis. Having a replaceable head on the ram is a big plus. Not only does this combat wear, but it gives you options of making custom holders for bearing drifts, boot press attachments, etc, etc.
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    Also it’s nice to have a brake for safely positioning the work.

    Must haves in my mind are a ratcheting handle for providing optimum pressure. A wheel for fine positioning is also really nice.

    Also on many of the arbor presses, sellers often think the number on the side is equivalent to the tonnage they are capable of exerting. In my case tge 3-½ Famco is a 5 ton press and not a 3-½ ton, so it’s big enough for automotive/ machine shop tasks, but still precise enough to use on carbon fiber bikes, etc.

    Finally ideally as with a vice you want to mount these proud of the front of your bench for pressing out shafts / broaching. I didn’t have enough space to do that without walking into it all the time, but I have enough height in mine to do any bike tasks. I just have to unbolt and reposition for very large pressing jobs.
    Last edited by Gunder; 06-30-2022 at 11:58 PM.

  23. #298
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    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    I’m going to remember this when you are trapped in Canuckistan and my trusty Kleins get you out.

    I am higher on Kleins, and Canuckistan, than you. They make all other American brands look like junk.

    We will see how I like the Wihas when I get back from vacation.
    Living near canukistan, I like to poke fun at the third world country to our north with a bit of sarcastic humor ( hell most third world countries at least have a 4 lane high way across them these days).

    I bet you will enjoy the Wihas

    Sadly most “American” brands these days are just marketing shells for crap made of Chineseum.

  24. #299
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    All I read here is that Gunder has an abnormally large throat-depth. Which I imagine could make him popular.
    Forum Cross Pollinator, gratuitously strident

  25. #300
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    All I read here is that Gunder has an abnormally large throat-depth. Which I imagine could make him popular.
    That and a pair of “promotion pads” is the key to success in most industries. Or so I have been told.
    Last edited by Gunder; 07-01-2022 at 12:17 AM.

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