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Thread: Tool Time

  1. #401
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    ^^^ Gunder twitches uncontrollably...

    I bought a giant channel lock type pliers from HF awhile ago. Rarely need it, but when I do need to hold something giant in place, it was worth every penny.

    https://www.harborfreight.com/16-in-...ers-64464.html
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  2. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesline View Post
    Added dry ice to my toolbox.

    Freed a stuck seatpost in a steel frame completely non-destructively by strapping a couple of chunks around the seat tube.

    I wonder why more people don't try this method before breaking out the torch or resorting to cutting/damaging the post. Worked like a charm after previous attempts failed.

    Of course the dry ice is no longer in my toolbox. Got to have fun playing with the fog-machine effect though.
    probably cuz no body ever heard of it, in all my internet wanking I have never heard of this ^^ one,

    do you mean you strapped dry ice to the seat post itself ( I assume) or the seat tube of the frame ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    I read that some Knipex patents ran out recently so the market is gonna be flooded with these things. For tools I don't use every day, these knockoffs are pretty good, surprisingly so IMO. No long term data yet though.
    Attachment 423156
    Yes - you can buy Husky / Dewalt / Milwaukee branded push button style pliers wrenches at HD / Lowes now.

    I loathe groove pliers and adjustable wrenches.



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  4. #404
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    ^^^ Gunder twitches uncontrollably...
    every time i post a tool link I know somebody is twitching

    uncontrolably
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Yes - you can buy Husky / Dewalt / Milwaukee branded push button style pliers wrenches at HD / Lowes now.

    I loathe groove pliers and adjustable wrenches.



    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I've been playing with both the regular and push button styles of Knipex recently, and I can't decide which I like more. I know the push button one is "better", but the regular is a lot faster to adjust.
    Last edited by EWG; 08-05-2022 at 05:01 PM.

  6. #406
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    Sorry to sound like a complete jong here, but what's the deal with Knipex? Is it just a high quality brand, or do they have some magical feature that makes them awesomer?
    I just ordered this for $7 for cutting zip ties. https://a.co/d/0wrlU9f I thought briefly about getting a $35 Knipex version before realizing I have no idea what they would do more betterer for me.
    Lots of Cream, Lots of Sugar

  7. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    probably cuz no body ever heard of it, in all my internet wanking I have never heard of this ^^ one,

    do you mean you strapped dry ice to the seat post itself ( I assume) or the seat tube of the frame ?
    First attempt was dry ice on the exposed seat post for a little bit and then a hair dryer on the frame. That didn't work. Cold probably just didn't travel far enough down the post to do anything.

    Second attempt was doing it on the seat tube and moving it around to chill everything. That did the trick, didn't even need to add heat (my original plan was to super chill everything and then quickly warm the outside). I think aluminum should have more thermal contraction than steel so it makes sense that it would come free at this point.

    "strapping" method was to just take two blocks of dry ice and hold them against the post until they melted (sublimated?) a bit of a groove in the middle. Then just wrap with a rag and hold with a ski strap and slide around until everything got good and frosty.

  8. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    I loathe groove pliers and adjustable wrenches.

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    As do I.

    But sometimes one or the other is in fact the best tool for the job.

  9. #409
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Sorry to sound like a complete jong here, but what's the deal with Knipex? Is it just a high quality brand, or do they have some magical feature that makes them awesomer?
    I just ordered this for $7 for cutting zip ties. https://a.co/d/0wrlU9f I thought briefly about getting a $35 Knipex version before realizing I have no idea what they would do more betterer for me.
    The Knipex Cobra tools in particular are a bit of both.

    They are high quality, but the design is also much nicer than something like a generic pair of channellocks. The way they grip works really well and the button adjust is convenient.

    The Pliers Wrench also falls into that category--clever design that's very similar to the Cobras, but with a wrench head instead.

    For something like your wire cutters, it is mostly just a quality issue. The Knipex version is just nicer, but functionally works the same.

  10. #410
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by grskier View Post
    even your I haven't used a hex that large is a brag on some gear... lol.

    EEwing cranks. I thought only Matt Jones put those on his dream builds.
    I got tired of snapping the XX1 carbon cranks so switched to EEwings... they are very nice. The price tag is the one drawback to them, but after snapping carbon cranks upon landing, they are worth it imop.

    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I've owned a bunch of different ones of the years.
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    The Snapon / CDI are by far the best that I have used. They are very reliable and have nice ratchets on the head end.
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    Snapon owns https://www.amazon.com/CDI-802MFRFMH...76734873&psc=1, but youClick image for larger version. 

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    The only difference is the Snapon has knurled AL and the CDI is knurled steel, so the snapon grip is slightly nicer. The Snapon also has a slightly smaller head, and the CDI's all use push lock heads.

    Quote Originally Posted by skizix View Post
    I wholeheartedly disagree. I've had brand new rotors in definite need of truing (mostly Avid - current Shimano's etc. seem much better, haven't had that in a while). I run Ice Tech's (which would seem to be more rigid) and they go out of true all the time (need truing multiple times a season). Same is true for the wife's SRAM rotors, and the kid's non-ice-tech shimanos. These are all mtb's, ridden hard. Are you talking about roadie rotors? Are you mtb-ing only on paved bike path? Crazy talk, vs my experience.

    EDIT: guess not roadie rotors - 203mm would kinda be overkill, LOL
    IF you are finding brand new rotors need truing, then you either have a defective rotor (rare) or you need to make sure you are properly calibrating you caliper to the rotor. If its a constant issue, than most likely your caliper mounts are not perfectly parallel and they need to be faced (I find this very rare as well these days).

    Quote Originally Posted by skizix View Post
    Occams razor tells me the standard, Park (or similar), no-moving-parts-or-batteries chain checker tool is the way to go.

    But that would be antithetical to this thread I suppose.
    I'm not a fan of cheaper measurement tools that require batteries as there accuracy tends to change based on the batteries charge. Tire pressure gauges are a good example of this as we previously disused. The other thing is how repeatable is the results? For example most $20 digital calipers wont give you consistent, accurate repeated measurements.... thats why the Mitituyo's are so much more. I suspect the digital chain checker isn't all that consistent or accurate.

    I really like the Park CC-2 chain checker. It's dead nuts simple and you can check a chain without it being on the bike.
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesline View Post
    Added dry ice to my toolbox.

    Freed a stuck seatpost in a steel frame completely non-destructively by strapping a couple of chunks around the seat tube.

    I wonder why more people don't try this method before breaking out the torch or resorting to cutting/damaging the post. Worked like a charm after previous attempts failed.
    .
    Temperature differentials can be a pretty powerful tool.
    I like to put bearings in the freezer for about an hour before I install them. Especially with hubs and frame pivots as it makes them way easier to press in. If its a bearing going onto a shaft, then I like to heat them before I press them on.


    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    I was at Harbor Freight getting harbor freight things (magnetic bowl for $1.50? Why not...) and noticed this 10" Knipex Cobra Pliers knock off, which I own a smaller Knipex version and really like. This knock-off was only $20 and it's replacing a husky wrench that has no button, no lock setting, has no room for fingers in certain positions, and is way heavier. Worth it IMO.

    Supposedly you can find Knipex Pliers wrench (I own two Knipex ones thanks to this thread) knockoffs under the Icon brand at Harbor Freight and they are getting really good reviews - apparently when restocked they sell out quickly. There were none in my store.

    I read that some Knipex patents ran out recently so the market is gonna be flooded with these things. For tools I don't use every day, these knockoffs are pretty good, surprisingly so IMO. No long term data yet though.

    Attachment 423156
    There has been a lot of companies make copies of the Knipex cobras, such as Gedore

    I'm not a fan of cheap adjustable pliers. They tend to deform / slip under pressure and that usually results in damage to whatever you are working on. Years ago I bought a Horror Freight soft blow mallet, thinking that even HF cant fuck up a hammer design. Well first time I sued it to pound off a rotor on a truck the damn thing exploded. Thats the last time I waisted time with any HF stuff.


    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    ^^^ Gunder twitches uncontrollably...
    Ha. but nope. I dont care what others decided is the best tool purchases for them. I just know form my personal experience that its worth it to me to only purchase quality tools that last.


    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Yes - you can buy Husky / Dewalt / Milwaukee branded push button style pliers wrenches at HD / Lowes now.

    I loathe groove pliers and adjustable wrenches.
    [/url]
    Nothing rounds fasteners faster than an adjustable wrench. At least the Knipex style takes most of the slop out so they tend to be almost as good as just using the proper sized wrench in the first place.


    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    I've been playing with both the regular and push button styles of Knipex recently, and I can't decide which I like more. I know the push button one is "better", but the regular is a lot faster to adjust.
    The advantage of the push button is it stays where you set it. Thats nice if you are using it for multiple fasteners of the same size.

    Quote Originally Posted by singlesline View Post
    The Knipex Cobra tools in particular are a bit of both.

    They are high quality, but the design is also much nicer than something like a generic pair of channellocks. The way they grip works really well and the button adjust is convenient.

    The Pliers Wrench also falls into that category--clever design that's very similar to the Cobras, but with a wrench head instead.

    For something like your wire cutters, it is mostly just a quality issue. The Knipex version is just nicer, but functionally works the same.
    Knipex has some innovative designs, but what really sets them apart, is all of their pliers are of good quality. They dont always make the. best, but there offerings are always top tier.
    Last edited by Gunder; 08-08-2022 at 03:30 PM.

  11. #411
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    Some new shit - battery powered hot saw Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #412
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    Suggestions for some kind of saddle or pad for a bottle jack? I need it for spare tire changing on a travel trailer, so it would be placed up under the axle at the leaf spring area.

    Thinking I may try drilling part way into a hockey puck using a hole saw, to create a recess for the bottle jack stub.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  13. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Thinking I may try drilling part way into a hockey puck using a hole saw, to create a recess for the bottle jack stub.
    Hole saws don't work for recesses - they're all or nothing. Forstner bit (kinda expensive at bigger sizes) is the best homeowner level tool for that type of job.

  14. #414
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    Quote Originally Posted by North View Post
    Hole saws don't work for recesses - they're all or nothing. Forstner bit (kinda expensive at bigger sizes) is the best homeowner level tool for that type of job.
    I have some wood boring drill bits that might be close in size. I was thinking just start the hole with the hole saw - use it to mark the outline of the hole, essentially.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  15. #415
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    "wood boring drill bit" isn't that just a Forstner bit? Or are you talking about a spade bit?

    Spade bit would probably work too but a Forstner bit will work betterer. I can't see any advantage of starting with a hole saw, at most just centerpunch your start location then have at it.

  16. #416
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Suggestions for some kind of saddle or pad for a bottle jack? I need it for spare tire changing on a travel trailer, so it would be placed up under the axle at the leaf spring area.

    Thinking I may try drilling part way into a hockey puck using a hole saw, to create a recess for the bottle jack stub.
    Are these what you are looking for? Might be cheaper than making them.

    Quote Originally Posted by North View Post
    Hole saws don't work for recesses - they're all or nothing. Forstner bit (kinda expensive at bigger sizes) is the best homeowner level tool for that type of job.
    Agreed 100%. Hole saws are only really good for metal, and even then, there are better options such as Annular cutters.


    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    "wood boring drill bit" isn't that just a Forstner bit? Or are you talking about a spade bit?

    Spade bit would probably work too but a Forstner bit will work betterer. I can't see any advantage of starting with a hole saw, at most just centerpunch your start location then have at it.
    I bet a spade bit would just tear it to shit.
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    Forstner's work really well for wood, plastics and other softer materials as they have a knife like ring around the edges that slice as it bores, then a center chisel that removes the material. They also work really well if you need to bore off center, or at an angle. Both of which a hole saw cant do.

    Only drawback to Forstner's is that you cant really resharpen them, so its probably best to go with a middle of the road set from a known brand.

    Speaking of hole saws, a good trick to know is that you can stack them inside of each other.
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    This is a really good way to enlarge an existing hole, as the smaller bit in the center will act as a guide in the existing hole for the larger bit.

  17. #417
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    Project done. Used a 1" wood drill bit (pictured, don't know what they are officially called), enlarged the hole using a metal rasp bit. Easy. Had a hockey puck in the bin already, so no cost.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  18. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Project done. Used a 1" wood drill bit (pictured, don't know what they are officially called), enlarged the hole using a metal rasp bit. Easy. Had a hockey puck in the bin already, so no cost.
    Well done. Thats a spade bit fyi.

  19. #419
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    Got a nice Bosch miter saw yesterday, currently building a miter table for it. The table is not worthy of the saw, but I'm learning.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  20. #420
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    Buddy of mine did a setup like that, but he made a dope flip shelf for the saw. Made the workbench full flat when flipped.


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  21. #421
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Project done. Used a 1" wood drill bit (pictured, don't know what they are officially called), enlarged the hole using a metal rasp bit. Easy. Had a hockey puck in the bin already, so no cost.
    Yep, hockey puck is perfect. Used to have a floor jack, and the puck fit perfectly in the cup that was the contact point.

    Unfortunately Id loaned it to a buddy and it was in his garage when his house was utterly consumed by the Marshal Fire. Bet the oil canister explode like a fkn grenade!

  22. #422
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    Got a nice Bosch miter saw yesterday, currently building a miter table for it. The table is not worthy of the saw, but I'm learning.

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    Nice.
    This is my setup.
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    I have a Festool Kapex, with an 8 foot bench on either side. If I was to do it over again, and had the space, Ideally I would have a 12 foot bench on either side, as I find the 8 footer too short a lot of the time, when working on home projects such as my deck, etc.
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    One of the best upgrades I did to the saw, was I removed the stock fence and replaced each side with a set of Incra track. This allows me to use there flip stops, wich are very precise. When not in use, its just two SHCS on each side to remove.

  23. #423
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    You must sell a lot of wedding photos!
    Forum Cross Pollinator, gratuitously strident

  24. #424
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    You must sell a lot of wedding photos!
    There is not enough money in the world to get me to shoot a wedding. Ill bought all of my festool stuff when we had some major home projects going on. After buying the tools and doing the work in my free time I saved over $30k off of the cheapest quote we got from the local contrators and ended up with better quality. At the end of the day I have nice tools because I dont pay someone else to by themselves nice tools to do what I am capable of doing myself.

  25. #425
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Buddy of mine did a setup like that, but he made a dope flip shelf for the saw. Made the workbench full flat when flipped.
    That's some good showmanship.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    Nice.
    This is my setup.

    I have a Festool Kapex.
    Of course you do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
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    One of the best upgrades I did to the saw, was I removed the stock fence and replaced each side with a set of Incra track. This allows me to use there flip stops, wich are very precise. When not in use, its just two SHCS on each side to remove.
    That's great. I was debating running wood the length of the table as a fence, or just using the Bosch miter fence and routing in length-wise T-Track stop. Maybe I'll go with your system instead, I can pick some up tomorrow at Woodcraft and give it a whirl - thanks Gunder!

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