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Thread: Tool Time

  1. #76
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    On a genuine ol' fashioned authentic steam powered aereoplane
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    15,333
    Bumping this up. Got me a pelican style box and some better Kaizen foam inserts on the way.

    Dee did you just cut your's with a snap knife or go all out with a hot knife?

  2. #77
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    Aug 2016
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    No longer Alexandria, VA
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    Wow my travel toolbox needs work, great ideas and inspiration. Thanks!

  3. #78
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    Jan 2008
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    BC to CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteroom_Guardian View Post
    Dee did you just cut your's with a snap knife or go all out with a hot knife?
    A little bit of both the regular knife and the hot knife. I found that the the hot knife works really well, but the foam melts back a bit, essentially creating a wide kerf of your cut, just take the extra width into consideration.
    Walmart has some "Wood burning tools" with knife attachments for cheap, its worth picking one up for under $20. I like the flat tips to smooth the rip-out layer below the tools.
    This is motivating me to redo some layers in my box, as I got some new lighter tools that I want to add to my travel case.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    196
    I got the long nose marker and long thin blades from here to do my tool box and they worked really well: https://kaizeninserts.com/t/tools-to-kaizen

    I also put marks on the blade using a sharpie to indicate depth so that I had an idea of how deep I was cutting.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    BC to CO
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    Tool Time

    I’ve been buying some new tools in the off season. I’ll be able to update some stories here soon.
    On my purchased list include:
    -Some fancy bits from a niche tool company out of Japan and Germany.
    -Some new bits for my travel case (which means new foam cuts)
    -Some new pieces for my garage wall set, mostly bearing presses, BB cup tools, and suspension tools.
    -a full set of tools to fill a new “Tool Roll” that will act as a every day carry set in the car, it will allow me perform almost any fix at a trail head, without having to bring my hard case.

    My fist new tool(s) I want to show off is the Bosch Easy Pump. (Freshly arriving from Germany, not distributed in USA).
    It’s a hand held battery operated pump. The battery is self contained, with a micro USB - USB charge cord. Features an automatic PSI (or BAR) shut off, max pressure of 150 PSI.
    I matched it with the Silca Hero Chuck, which is in my opinion the best presets air chuck/head in the industry.
    It weight 500g (1.1lbs) with the Hero Chuck attached, and the battery life is claimed to fill 8 bike tires. I’m sure it will last many “top ups”.

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  6. #81
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    Sep 2018
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    Well Dee you need to post purchase links for all that stuff for sure. I’m in.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by EWG View Post
    Well Dee you need to post purchase links for all that stuff for sure. I’m in.
    Quote Originally Posted by bennymac View Post
    For reals though - do we need a welfare check on Dee?
    A tool review is my response to the wellness check.

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    BC to CO
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    I have been putting together some tools to build a "tool roll" that can live in my car, and can be at the trail head when I drive to trails, or road trip to the desert.
    I want to be able to do most repairs without having to bring my travel box with me.
    Here's a look and a description what I have on the go:
    This is the tools out of their pockets
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Right to Left, bottom row then top row,
    -Wolftooth Tool Wrap
    -Wolftooth BB wrench with 1" bit holder, also inserted in the standard 16T 44mm BB size is an adapter for XTR BB 16/39 and XT BB 16/41
    -Abbey Tool Hanger Alignment Gauge (HAG)
    -Park Tool 15mm pedal wrench
    -Knipex Pliers Wrench 180mm (7-1/4") which opens to 35mm.
    -Felco cable cutters
    -12" toe/cam strap
    -General multi bit screwdriver
    -Park tool measuring tape metric (and imperial)
    -Wera Hex-Plus kit. 8,6,5,4,3,2.5,2mm, T25,T10 (in a nice velcro case)
    -Bosch Easy Pump with Silca Hero valve.
    -Lezyne Digital shock pump
    -Wera 1/4" mini ratchet drive set. It includes a Zyklop ratchet: an extension bit holder, bits are 8,6,5,4,3,2.5,2mm, T25,T10. Also in a nice velcro holder.

    Top Row:
    -Wolftooth 1" inserts. Cassette/lockring, Cinch/ISIS, 8mm hex with a 16mm adapter for Cinch cranks.
    -Shimano crank preload tool
    -Wolftooth Pack Pliers, to open quick links, plus 8 other uses. It has 2 extra quick links in side.
    -Leatherman, mostly for a needle nose plier
    -Spoke tools, Park Tool Black and Red, Shimano size, and bladed spoke holder
    -Valve core tool, valve cores, tubeless vables, Presta adapter
    -C02 20oz and 16 oz with a C02 head
    -Razor knife
    -Disc Brake bleed block, pad spacers, 7mm and 8mm wrench.
    -Sharpies and paint pens
    -Shimano syringe and syringe with M5 threads cut onto it to act as a funnel.
    -Shimano mineral oil
    -Chain lube, degreaser, grease pack, carbon paste.

    I'm still finalizing it, and I'm missing:
    -Zip ties and electrical tape
    -Tire boot and tube patch kit, I'll throw a Tubolito in there too.
    -Shifter cable, length of cable housing and some ferrels and ends.
    I'm trying to find the right torque bit/end/wrench for the kit. I'm leaning towards the Silca Torque stick.

    Here's what it looks like with tools in their pockets:
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    Here it is rolled up and it weighs just under 4.5kg (10lbs)
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    Thoughts, questions, what am I missing?

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    239
    That is beautiful. And slightly shame inducing .


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Great Falls
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    89
    Shit, that's nicer than my every day tool set by a mile.

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    2,100
    Dee I've always wondered what type of car you drive and where you typically park it? Any bumper stickers I should keep an eye out for while I'm on the hunt?

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumbest Known Time View Post
    Shit, that's nicer than my every day tool set by a mile.
    I’ll do a post with my wall tools soon.
    I got a shipping notification today for some niche tools shipping out of Japan.
    Hopefully I’ll get them by mid next week.

    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    Dee I've always wondered what type of car you drive and where you typically park it? Any bumper stickers I should keep an eye out for while I'm on the hunt?
    Look for the “Change for a nickel” sticker

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    5,087
    Floor pump. My daughter is off to Univ Utah and I’m sending a basic tool kit with her. We are down to one kinda crappy floor pump so it goes with her, and I’ll get a nicer one for my lovely wife. Considering a 2 stage high pressure/high volume (I think?)

    So, what floor pump do I want? I’ve never spent big on floor pumps as I consider them to be like rugby balls - disposable, nomadic items - but maybe it’s time to step up.

    Need to buy it soon …
    Last edited by EWG; 05-28-2022 at 08:24 AM.

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
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    Lezyne pumps punch above their weight for value. The new chuck is good, and as long as your valve stems aren't too loose you won't have any trouble like all of the dopes who leave negative reviews. https://ride.lezyne.com/collections/...el-floor-drive


    Or just go full Dentist with this one for $850. https://silca.cc/products/silca-cust...-richard-sachs

    But I pretty much stopped using floor pumps after I got one of these and put a Silca Hiro chuck on it. https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Produc...-Tools/2475-20
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    LV-426
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    19,628
    Blackburn pumps aren't the best quality, but they warranty them for life, and have great customer service. They just sent me a replacement pump head for free, on a 10 year old pump.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  16. #91
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    5,087
    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    Lezyne pumps punch above their weight for value. The new chuck is good, and as long as your valve stems aren't too loose you won't have any trouble like all of the dopes who leave negative reviews. https://ride.lezyne.com/collections/...el-floor-drive


    Or just go full Dentist with this one for $850. https://silca.cc/products/silca-cust...-richard-sachs

    But I pretty much stopped using floor pumps after I got one of these and put a Silca Hiro chuck on it. https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Produc...-Tools/2475-20
    That Milwaukee one can’t be accurate enough for bikes right? And it wouldn’t work with a road bike?

  17. #92
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The land of lot's of houses, CO
    Posts
    297
    I got this for my pool toys and such, but now it’s my floor pump.
    Digital gauge and will inflate a car tire to 80psi. Very slowly but it’ll get there eventually.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ON...P747/308746324



    Sent from my iPad using TGR Forums

  18. #93
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    Sep 2018
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    5,087
    Ok you guys are all using compressors for bike tires? Am I that far off the back? It was always beaten into my head by my wrenching mentors that they are inaccurate and not suitable for 110psi.

    Am I just going full dinosaur here?

  19. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BC to CO
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    Tool Time

    Lezyne or (can’t believe I’m saying this) Specialized. They actually build really good accessories.

    Let me check, I think I have a Lezyne Gravel Digital pump to sell for a good deal.

    Their “Gravel” pumps go to 100 psi, and still push enough volume to fill MTB tires efficiently.
    Unless your riding a track bike on a velodrome you shouldn’t need to pump over 100psi, Eliminating the need for a “high pressure, or high pressure” choice.

  20. #95
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
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    18,160

    Tool Time

    I have a joe blow floor pump
    Use it for road tires mostly
    It does what it’s supposed to
    And it’s 9yo

  21. #96
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Chamonix
    Posts
    999
    Bontrager Charger. Head works, gauge works, hasn't broken in the 15 years I've had it and only cost me €20. I've never used a fancy pump and thought "Damn this is nice". Just me?

  22. #97
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    Sep 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Lezyne or (can’t believe I’m saying this) Specialized. They actually build really good accessories.

    Let me check, I think I have a Lezyne Gravel Digital pump to sell for a good deal.

    Their “Gravel” pumps go to 100 psi, and still push enough volume to fill MTB tires efficiently.
    Unless your riding a track bike on a velodrome you shouldn’t need to pump over 100psi, Eliminating the need for a “high pressure, or high pressure” choice.
    Lemme know if you have an extra there. Might be great for her. Thanks for looking.

    Although I have to admit to inflating my personal road tires to at least 110 with regularity…

    But she never does.

  23. #98
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    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    Unless your riding a track bike on a velodrome you shouldn’t need to pump over 100psi, Eliminating the need for a “high pressure, or high pressure” choice.
    I’m road riding 95psi front, 105 rear at 700x25 clincher (no latex)[i’m 210#]
    Is that overkill?
    I used to ride 110front/back on 23 so I’m used to firm ride
    But i don’t get pinches so its been working

  24. #99
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Tahoe-ish
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    2,367
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    I’m road riding 95psi front, 105 rear at 700x25 clincher (no latex)[i’m 210#]
    Is that overkill?
    I used to ride 110front/back on 23 so I’m used to firm ride
    But i don’t get pinches so its been working
    I stopped pumping my tires over 100psi years ago. The world has moved on from that (and we're all faster and more comfortable for it). YMMV, but I use 75-80psi on my road bike with 25mm tubed tires (I'm 64kg) for comfort. Unless you're HUGE, 100psi is probably too much. https://silca.cc/pages/sppc-pro Recommends 90 ish for you... It really depends on surface though. I can't use the recommended pressures for MTB and rocky gravel because I'll get rim strikes, but it works well for anything that's not really rocky.

    The Milwaukee inflator works far better than I expected it to. Even with the tiny 1.5AH batteries it will pump at least 8 bike tires. The gauge is accurate at pressures from 16 to 80+psi in my experience. It is within a PSI or so of my analog Jaco gauge and the digital one on my Lezyne floor pump. My only complaint is that it sometimes overshoots the set pressure, and I'm not sure why but it seems to be related to exactly how I connect the chuck.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  25. #100
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    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    Tool Time

    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    I stopped pumping my tires over 100psi years ago. The world has moved on from that (and we're all faster and more comfortable for it). YMMV, but I use 75-80psi on my road bike with 25mm tubed tires (I'm 64kg) for comfort. Unless you're HUGE, 100psi is probably too much. https://silca.cc/pages/sppc-pro Recommends 90 ish for you... It really depends on surface though. I can't use the recommended pressures for MTB and rocky gravel because I'll get rim strikes, but it works well for anything that's not really rocky.
    Can’t hurt to test it a bit
    (The ratio for road seems tight fore/aft 48/52 so that too will be an adjustment for me also [45/55]…maybe it shakes out all ok)

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