Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 47
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,229

    Water leak in house wall/ceiling

    Woke up at 2 AM this morning to a smoke detector alarming in the basement, because water was dripping out of it. Removed detector, got bucket, towels, etc, shut off the water, drained lines in the house (opened faucets). I think we stopped it pretty quickly after it started - now to figure it out.

    Leak appeared in the ceiling of a finished basement (drywalled, painted). No obvious plumbing leaks at any connection to sinks, toilets, etc, in the house. Water that leaked appears clean, isn't smelly, guessing it's from a fresh line and not drain line. No rain for a long time, leak isn't from outside the house - definitely an interior pipe somewhere.

    Do I start with the insurance company, a plumber, or a leak detection company?
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    in a freezer in Italy
    Posts
    2,960
    I've never dealt with them so I have no idea if they're the right choice but I'd think about calling ServPro or somebody else who specializes in problem resolution like them. You've got a physical issue (the water) and a financial issue (dealing with insurance), it would seem wise to get somebody who's used to dealing with both sides of it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Udaho
    Posts
    206
    I had a flooded basement a few years back and hired ServPro. They were terrible. It was management & construction amateur hour every time they showed up, which was sporadic at best once the contract was signed, poorly communicated, and never the same crew or supervisor. Not once. And their ineptitude directly caused major delays in both the clean up process and insurance processing. I ultimately had to have my insurance agency pay them off to get them out of my house so I could hire a contractor to clean up their mess. Their staff and managers were friendly and pleasant and utterly incompetent. If you go that route, personally I’d look for a different company. /rant

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Retardbumville
    Posts
    746
    refrigerator supply line?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,229
    Thanks guys. Any reason to not just call a plumber?

    I'm going to check out the fridge water line connection, as it's the last connection in the house I haven't looked at. And then climb into the crawlspace and see if I see the leak source from inside there.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    in a freezer in Italy
    Posts
    2,960
    I think I'd at least call my insurance company. When the plumber gets there he might find the issue right off but if he has to start ripping into walls to track it down, who knows where that leads or what he finds when he rips in there.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    15,604
    Quote Originally Posted by senior researcher View Post
    refrigerator supply line?
    That fucked up a guy in my ski club on his 2nd home. Wasn't there for a few months in winter and all the water ended up freezing and breaking his foundation. Not to self, always turn the water off when gone.
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    26,080
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Thanks guys. Any reason to not just call a plumber?

    I'm going to check out the fridge water line connection, as it's the last connection in the house I haven't looked at. And then climb into the crawlspace and see if I see the leak source from inside there.
    I would have already called a plumber.

    Once you get a clue as to what happened and the damage caused, a call to insurance would be next.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,824
    Idk what kind of home repair skills you have but finding and fixing a water leak isn't rocket science. Start by cutting out the damaged drywall and turn on your water them see if you can see where the drip is them go up from there. I would hold off on starting a insurance claim to see if you can find the leak. Often times it's just a copper line or coupling that has failed. Great idea about the refrigerator water line. Try shutting off the supply valve to it with the water main on to eliminate it as the source.
    Repair usually is exposing the spot by removing some drywall, splice in a new section(copper or pex) then patch your wall.
    You don't want to call in ANY of those emergency remediation companies. They don't do shit other than shop vac water, spray enzyme then start calling real repair people. I had a renter freak out after flooding a basement with the washing machine then call one without talking to me. Those fuckers told her "don't worry it's all covered by insurance" then sent me a bill for $3k after literally shopvac some water spray enzyme and run a fan for few hours.
    I told them I didn't authorize shit and told them to pound sand and gave them a check for $1000.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Gallatin County
    Posts
    1,067
    Quote Originally Posted by fatnslow View Post
    Idk what kind of home repair skills you have but finding and fixing a water leak isn't rocket science. Start by cutting out the damaged drywall and turn on your water them see if you can see where the drip is them go up from there. I would hold off on starting a insurance claim to see if you can find the leak. Often times it's just a copper line or coupling that has failed. Great idea about the refrigerator water line. Try shutting off the supply valve to it with the water main on to eliminate it as the source.
    Repair usually is exposing the spot by removing some drywall, splice in a new section(copper or pex) then patch your wall.
    You don't want to call in ANY of those emergency remediation companies. They don't do shit other than shop vac water, spray enzyme then start calling real repair people. I had a renter freak out after flooding a basement with the washing machine then call one without talking to me. Those fuckers told her "don't worry it's all covered by insurance" then sent me a bill for $3k after literally shopvac some water spray enzyme and run a fan for few hours.
    I told them I didn't authorize shit and told them to pound sand and gave them a check for $1000.
    I agree that these repairs are easy to accomplish and cutting the wet drywall need to happen sooner versus later. The refrigerator water supply tubing got me once and it was just a scratch on the tubing that leaked years after installation.

    The advantage to calling a restoration company (not Service Pro or Service Master) is access to big dehumidifiers for drying out the space. "Black mold" Stachybotrus chartatrum is a condition you want to avoid and later on being able to tell future buyers about the restoration after a leak that "professionals" were used may be an advantage. In the old days we would bleach it, dry it and then repair the dry wall.

    Good luck.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,082
    You have central air in the house?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    24,172
    I v'e had 4 or 5 leaks and I've dealt with them myself, random disjointed all-wet thots

    - don't leave a hose on an outside tap at -30C it can back up & burst the fitting, even the valves that are way in the house behind the insulation

    - In my last house when the water heater went it fucked the carpets SO at the same time as the HE furnace instal in this house i had the guy proactively drain the water heater & instal a splash pan with a pipe to the floor drain, they are really cheap and anybody repalcing the water heater should put one in at the same time

    - if the carpets get saturated wet might you as well replace em in fact get rid of them all together go lino or whatever

    - I have never had an insurance claim but a GF had a sump pump failure/ flooded basement claim, insurance adjusters will play a back and forth game with you and the insurance company, be patient and good luck !

    -test yer sump pump before the flood season, to make sure the float mech works, also if its old enough to have a metal impeller its in danger of rusting off, if it does the pump just runs forever & the basement floods, latest design of the exact same pump now uses a plastic impeller only costs 100$ and will never rust off

    - I had a drain leaking for a long time ( tennants who never complain ) so I had to cut out all the DW & studs up to 2' , the black drain pipe was glued too close to the concrete to repair so I needed a plumber to jack hammer enough concrete to replace the fitting, he cost me 250$ but sometimes its worth it to pay the pro, true for plumbers and realestate agents IME,

    besides hating RE agents do we also hate plumbers ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,229
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Thanks guys. Any reason to not just call a plumber?

    I'm going to check out the fridge water line connection, as it's the last connection in the house I haven't looked at. And then climb into the crawlspace and see if I see the leak source from inside there.
    Fridge water line is bone dry, dusty. Braided hose of some kind - not metal, but not the skinny cheap clear plastic ones either.

    Crawlspace inspection: no sign of any leaks or wetness. A couple old crusty bits at connections.

    There are no water lines or sewer lines running near where the water leaked out of the ceiling, based on crawlspace inspection. So the water traveled there from somewhere else.

    House has central heat, but no air conditioning.

    I think next step is call plumber. I have no drywall repair skills, so cutting open walls and making them look good later is going to be somebody else's job.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,229
    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    I would have already called a plumber.

    Once you get a clue as to what happened and the damage caused, a call to insurance would be next.
    I'm going this route.

    Homeowner policy looks like going through insurance is going to cost over $5-6K after deductible and water damage claim surcharge for a couple of years - - if the insurer even covers it. Going to see what a plumber says first.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    On Vacation for the Duration
    Posts
    13,775
    No skill needed to cut a hole in the ceiling to take a look. Leak might be obvious. Signed Beenthere Dunthat. A couple of times. My money is on water feed to the fridge

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,258
    I like a good mystery.
    Keep us posted.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    your vacation
    Posts
    2,751
    Stop peeing in the closet at night.

    Do not call servpro or any nationwide type remediation co

    Water finds the lowest easiest point before it shows itself can lights are a big exit place research yourself call a plumber drywall removal maybe it's not hard to find but an idiot will fuck your house up for sure be leery of idiots but sometime s they guy who smell s the most like weed might be your best guy to solve the problem

    I'd suggest not dealing w insurance if it is a minor issue insurance companies are the scum if the earth and will hose you in the end

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,824
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    I'm going this route.

    Homeowner policy looks like going through insurance is going to cost over $5-6K after deductible and water damage claim surcharge for a couple of years - - if the insurer even covers it. Going to see what a plumber says first.
    Don't discount the fact if you have multiple claims your insurance company might drop you.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    The Goods Department
    Posts
    1,092
    Quote Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post
    No skill needed to cut a hole in the ceiling to take a look. Leak might be obvious. Signed Beenthere Dunthat. A couple of times. My money is on water feed to the fridge
    Sounds like he checked the fridge water line. No air handlers with condensate lines.

    My bet is now a pinhole leak in a copper line within 5 feet of your water recirc pump.
    Skiing in the rockies is like 70's porn

    Lots of bush

    Some wood

    No faceshots...

    -Mtnlion

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,617
    Quote Originally Posted by fatnslow View Post
    Don't discount the fact if you have multiple claims your insurance company might drop you.
    yep. Had an upstairs neighbor flood their place and cause water damage to mine, twice in a 3 year period. I filed claims both times, and both times my insurance recouped from their insurance. When i went to buy a house this past year my own insurance and another one refused to cover my new home because of the 2 recent water damage claims. Sick.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,229
    Quote Originally Posted by Asspen View Post
    Sounds like he checked the fridge water line. No air handlers with condensate lines.

    My bet is now a pinhole leak in a copper line within 5 feet of your water recirc pump.
    I don't have a recirculation pump - if you mean the sort of instant hot water at any faucet type of thing.

    FWIW, house is on its own well, with well pump. Pressure tank and piping where it comes into the house is lower than the location of the leak, and not anywhere near it, so I doubt that's involved.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,824
    If you want to save a few bucks make sure to save the cutout drywall for paint matching and paint the walls/ceilings yourself after the drywall repair is done.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    On Vacation for the Duration
    Posts
    13,775
    I had water on a ceiling three times. Each time I found the leak by cutting damaged ceiling away as a first move. Leaking 1st floor dining room was a roof leak traveling through the walls. Wet kitchen was condensation off the water supply to the shower above it when then the kids were into 30 minute snhowers. Wet kitchen #2 was my screwing up a toilet install that dripped once a minute for 3 months.

    Serrated carving knife works.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,229
    Waiting for call back from plumber who thinks they can get here today. Scheduled a different one for tomorrow, but as we have no running water inside, today would be better.

    Q on dehumidifier and professional drying out stuff: necessary given where I live? - - high desert, going to be about 93* outside today, humidity will be single digits. I can open the windows in the basement and dehumidify pretty quickly.

    There is one smallish section of carpet in basement that got wet. But it's not really any more wet than when the carpet cleaners do their work.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    24,172
    from what you say i would be tempted to cut a hole right where the water came trhu to take a look-see and follow it back since it might very likely need fixing anyhow

    no body looks up at a ceiling to see if its fixed purty, a wall at eye level is way more of a worry

    you could just turn the water on but put a big garbage can under the drip

    I have seen ceilings full of water balloon out big time !
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •