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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    32,281
    Quote Originally Posted by teleee View Post
    Maybe dont take advice from a teenager in the Carolinas about touring.
    Daddy bought him his touring quiver.

    It's almost as funny as Bunny having a mentor.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Cackalacky
    Posts
    2,985
    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    Daddy bought him his touring quiver.
    could not be further from the truth. i busted my ass last summer working marine construction and saved up enough to build a quiver and have some spending money in college, as i should have.
    you don't want no smoke.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,799
    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    Daddy bought him his touring quiver.

    It's almost as funny as Bunny having a mentor.
    Jesus dude, you really are an asshole sometimes.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    24,177
    Quote Originally Posted by rfconroy View Post
    I would disagree with the statement that weight is the be-all-end-all.

    ROM in the walk mode is way more important than weight. The hoji free is significantly heavier than the mtn explore, but the ROM in walk mode is larger, allowing you to be more efficient on your strides. Also going to ski way better than the even the MTN Lab.
    I would disagree that ^^ is what I said,

    i said to get a boot that fits is the be all end all and get enough boot to drive BC skis, 1300-1500 is the category that will do that, maestrale/ hoji / ZGTP are in that category and BTW they walk OK

    Whom the fuck is talking about Mtn Lab ? I didnt say anything about mtn lab, probably THE last boot i would recommend anyone try
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Grandma's Basement
    Posts
    315
    Re-read my comment there, came off more harsh than I had intended - did not mean to offend there.
    "Poop is funny" - Frank Reynolds

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
    Posts
    12,521
    it was easier in the garmonts or scarpas ,day wreckers, silverattas dynas that only went to 10
    or tele
    or it was harder
    i cants members
    try not to overthinks it
    it all kinda works
    if your skiing does
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -ski on in eternal peace
    "I have posted in here but haven't read it carefully with my trusty PoliAsshat antenna on."-DipshitDanno

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    24,177
    I actualy out fitted a snow boarder/ newby skier who said he had no idea wtf, from 1000 kms away entirely by text messages, it was my youngest son and i had sent him a bunch of money so he had no choice

    told him to try on technica/maestrale/ another one i forget and buy the best fitting ... he got the technica

    Pointed him at a 2 yr old ski/skin/binding setup off MEC gear swap

    I thru some more money at him, we did a hut trip and he did awesume
    Last edited by XXX-er; 05-28-2021 at 09:51 AM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  8. #33
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    13,537
    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    You'll get a lot of differing opinions on what is "too heavy" or "too light." The correct answer is really to get on gear similar to the stuff the people you'll be touring with are using. Personally, I tour on heavy-ish skis, light-ish bindings, and medium-ish boots (ON3P BillyGoat 116 Tours or Woodsman 108 tours, G3 Ion LT/Zed or Salomon MTN Pin, Atomic Hawx XTD 130 or Dynafit TLT6P depending on the tour). The stuff you mentioned would be fine - on the heavy side, but fine.

    As mentioned above, you need to learn to ski first. In a resort. Nobody likes to hear this but it's the reality. If you can't ski competently, you are a liability to yourself and to your partners. Backcountry conditions are inherently variable, terrain is variable and unmanicured, even minor injuries can become very serious when in the winter backcountry, and winter nights are very long and very cold. Furthermore, it's just not a good environment to improve your skiing because you just don't get enough repetitions in a day. You can get more downhill skiing in one hour at the resort than you can in a full day in the backcountry. I'm not telling you that you can't go for mellow tours next year, but you NEED to spend time at the resort too. I generally recommend that you be at least an advanced downhill skier (comfortably able to ski black ungroomed runs) before seriously starting to tour.

    Avy classes - take a free awareness class first, use your touring gear to skin in a controlled environment first (like uphill at a resort), THEN take a Level 1 class. You will get much more out of it that way.
    Excellent advice. Variable conditions found in the Backcountry may never be seen at a resort. Not knowing how to handle a breakable crust could be painful.

    Good luck.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    9,322
    Quote Originally Posted by stealurface831 View Post
    could not be further from the truth. i busted my ass last summer working marine construction and saved up enough to build a quiver and have some spending money in college, as i should have.
    How many days touring in the bc did you get this season? Not skinning at the ski hill. Good on you for buying your own quiver but youíre 20 and live in the SE US, you donít exactly have a wealth of experience.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    9,090

    A bunch of dumb questions - first touring setup

    SFB and XXX back to back with the best advice.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    24,177
    Quote Originally Posted by rfconroy View Post
    Re-read my comment there, came off more harsh than I had intended - did not mean to offend there.
    well as opposed to Walter you are not an asshole, just wrong

    rl]
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Slightly off route
    Posts
    104
    I'd add that it was helpful for me to occasionally ski my touring set-up in the resort just to get some solid hours in.

    Preferably on marginal snow days and then intentionally picking steeper runs.

    It can suck going hours uphill and then ski down on a set-up you have barely skied.

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    388
    ^^^Very true, especially as you get into more climb-to-ski stuff where you're 3-5 hours in, tired, and your first 10 turns are going to be the hardest of the day!

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    24,177
    IME its not that unusual for someone to book a hut trip and not have skied yet that season, ad to that they are telewankers ... it will be a long week
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    10,706
    Everyone has their personal preferences about what gear works best. Different snowpacks, different terrain, different goals, and different physiques all affect this. You're going to have to figure out for yourself what works best for you. In the meantime, get a middle of the road setup, preferably used, and preferably reasonably priced. Like others said, it probably won't be perfect, but it'll give you a baseline to compare to. The Wildcats you have + whatever pin binding + whatever ~1300-1400g boot fits your foot would be a good place to start.

    Despite what many will say, moving around in the backcountry isn't rocket science. Be aware of your surroundings and keep it conservative. Go with a partner that hopefully knows what they're doing. You'll make mistakes. The goal is to keep those mistakes inconsequential. Classes are great but experience is greater.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,617
    Get a boot that fits. Get a ski that works in a variety of conditions and isnt noticably heavy. Get a binding that feels fairly sturdy and isnt minimalist. Understand that you will get into the shape neccessary to lug your equipment at the pace of your partners, no matter how heavy your equipment is... you will adapt to it. I havent had the granny gear on my MTB working in more than a year... i just adapted out of neccesity and dont need it anymore.

    Learn to ski. the fact is that the variable snow you will encounter in the BC is a wider range or variable, more difficult, and more often encountered than in a resort where the snow surface never stays unskied for more than a day or two. Being a strong skier will help keep you safer.

    Bring bacon. various types of bacon. and chocolate. lots if it to share. And as long as you arent a total anchor, those partners will keep inviting you back. The more you go, the more you will figure out what kind of equipment will suit your wants and needs.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,639
    When I was a teen venturing into the BC I didnít have gear. I sidestepped from Kirkwood to Round Top.

    Another trip I fell off a cliff.

    OP is fine. Get some friends. All your gear will suck. Then youíll replace it. Then that gear will be rad until it sucks.

    After a decade or so youíll know exactly what you want so well that youíll disagree with reviews before even trying gear. Itíll all suck. But youíll be strong, knowledgeable, scared, and skiing will be easy.

    Get dedicated boots and bindings.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    13,480
    ^ The last three posts are worth reading carefully.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Lake Wallenpaupack, PA
    Posts
    1,636
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinned View Post
    Lange XT Free and Tecnica Cochise both fit comfortably.
    Iíve got some Cochises that are in very good shape/no boot work......in a 27.5 if ur interested?

  20. #45
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Truckee & Sonoma
    Posts
    12,907
    On that note, I have some 26.5 Cochise 120ís that are well loved but theyíre just sitting here in my garage in Truckee.
    I ski 135 degree chutes switch to the road.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Shuswap Highlands
    Posts
    3,186
    Experiencing the backcountry for the first couple seasons is all about the suffrage. Take all the good advice posted above and file it away for at least 2yrs. Take your favourite alpine setup and get a pair of trekkers, some avy courses and equip, and a huge multi-day pack loaded for year-long multi-stage traverse. Don't forget about 40lbs of photog equipment. Get after it.

    If you survive your pilgrimage to the holy land, and then survive the hazing via the TR posted here of your experience, put out a wish list of the previously posted equipment. You will be suitably rewarded. Or you will realize that the ungroomed goods are a fool's errand and you will be both happier and richer sticking to the piste.

    Or just get a sled.

    You're welcome

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    96
    Thank you everyone for the thoughtful advice, I appreciate it. Have a lot to learn still, but am looking forward to it. If anyone wants to sell me their old gear... I wear a 26.5 boot and would be comfortable on skis in the 180ish range hah.

    BCMtnHound - I'll start the dumb questions about sleds thread in ~3 weeks.

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    9,645
    Get boots that fit and are comfortable to skin in. Then try skis, bindings, and skins until you find something that 1-is a setup you donít think about or fiddle with while skinning 2-you donít say fuck these things are heavy at the top of a climb and 3-you donít say man these ski like shit at the bottom of a run. Even skin inbounds for awhile to figure these things out. BC is all compromises and foot pain and blisters are at minimum a day wrecker and worse case a true hazard. Youíll spend 90-95% of your day climbing and transitioning and you should be observing terrain and conditions, not jacking with your gear and having that on your mind. You also donít want to be super tired and get hurt falling on the skin track or on the down. That last 5-10% should be fun because earning laps is work but I find the funnest skis are generally heavier and you always have to be thinking of the first two points first.

    Then have a real grasp of your abilities and be able to convey those to your BC buddies. In a perfect world, they know you ski because youíve all skied together. Downplaying your ability will have you miss some fun lines. Overstating will lose you some BC partners quickly. Ski lines that are a couple levels down from what youíre confident on inbounds. Conditions change quick and you may need those extra couple levels of ability to get home safely.

    Get safe. Learn the craft. Take some courses. Pick good partners. Know how to be honest and humble and be ready to speak up if something makes you uncomfortable. Take the tags off your gear before the trailhead because youíve practiced with it. Read and study. Check out your local avi forecast everyday even if you donít go skiing. And if your basic first aid isnít good, get gooder. And be in enough fitness to help not hinder your group. And buy dinner or beers for the guys showing you the ropes for the first while. Theyíre probably slowing their days down so you get to see cool stuff, ski pow, and come home safely.

    Someday youíll be proficient enough that you can pick out your gear and lines without taking advice from us nitwits.

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    96
    Thank you to everyone - was able to get the boots sorted out thanks to TahoeJ. Managed to pick up some Tectons at a mega deal from the Black Diamond warehouse sale.

    Need to sort out the skis and skins now.

    Planning to try all this out in the resort first and then sign up for some courses so I can learn a bit more.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Truckee & Sonoma
    Posts
    12,907

    A bunch of dumb questions - first touring setup

    and like I said, happy to take you out next winter and show you the ropes. Thatís the best way to learn by far instead of trying to figure it all out yourself. I started that way with a heavy ass setup (granted there were less options back then) and had some friends set me straight. Gotta pay it forward.
    I ski 135 degree chutes switch to the road.

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