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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Do you know if there is a way to see if this is an aquifer used by anyone but me or my general neighborhood?

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    What an insufferable cunt.
    Relentlessly pursuing beauty in an irredeemably ugly world.

  2. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by glademaster View Post
    What an insufferable cunt.
    I'm just wondering man. Geez. I mean it could be a simple ground water well. I got no clue other than I don't pay the town for water or sewer.

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    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    I'm just wondering man. Geez. I mean it could be a simple ground water well. I got no clue other than I don't pay the town for water or sewer.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    Poison the water and see who dies?

  4. #129
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    Live Free or Die
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    I'm just wondering man. Geez. I mean it could be a simple ground water well. I got no clue other than I don't pay the town for water or sewer.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    The short answer is it is complicated in the Northeast. Likely you are in bedrock, so rather than a saturated layer of soil, water is traveling from the surface into a bunch of interconnected fractures in the bedrock. But generally speaking groundwater will follow surface water divides, so if you are on a hill or near a ridge, you are probably more in the source area. But it is all interconnected, and over pumping in one well can draw down water levels nearby from the cone of depression. Bottom line, it rains more in the northeast, but we also have built less storage, so sometimes you have to worry about drought.

  5. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by geomorph View Post
    The short answer is it is complicated in the Northeast. Likely you are in bedrock, so rather than a saturated layer of soil, water is traveling from the surface into a bunch of interconnected fractures in the bedrock. But generally speaking groundwater will follow surface water divides, so if you are on a hill or near a ridge, you are probably more in the source area. But it is all interconnected, and over pumping in one well can draw down water levels nearby from the cone of depression. Bottom line, it rains more in the northeast, but we also have built less storage, so sometimes you have to worry about drought.
    for sure on a hill. thanks for the info...never really thought about it too much. Our well is pretty shallow at 175ft...
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

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  6. #131
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    Dec 2003
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    Nhampshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by geomorph View Post
    The short answer is it is complicated in the Northeast. Likely you are in bedrock, so rather than a saturated layer of soil, water is traveling from the surface into a bunch of interconnected fractures in the bedrock. But generally speaking groundwater will follow surface water divides, so if you are on a hill or near a ridge, you are probably more in the source area. But it is all interconnected, and over pumping in one well can draw down water levels nearby from the cone of depression. Bottom line, it rains more in the northeast, but we also have built less storage, so sometimes you have to worry about drought.
    Yeah, other than weird bedrock formations sectioning off areas (which you'd probably know about from weird building patterns/rock formations), you can generally assume that everyone is pulling from common resources, as in the broader sense it's often the same watershed. You can look up some info here: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal...er/watersheds/
    If you want more detailed info, your town probably has a water board or a board that deals with water stuff, and you can usually get info from them. Water management is maturing, but in many cases is somewhat immature. My town does a decent job, but only because we're the municipal water source for roughly 50% of city demand in nearby towns/cities.

  7. #132
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    Oct 2003
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    Big in Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyCarter View Post
    Poison the water and see who dies?
    LSD and listen for Dead music.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  8. #133
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    May 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    LSD and listen for Dead music.
    see thats the problem...thats all i play out on the deck...
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  9. #134
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    Sep 2005
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    Fresh Lake City
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    Quote Originally Posted by glademaster View Post
    What an insufferable cunt.
    Are you talking about yourself again? Because "insufferable can't" sums you up perfectly.

  10. #135
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    Oct 2003
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    Big in Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    see thats the problem...thats all i play out on the deck...
    That explains it. Your water is spiked.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  11. #136
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    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Probably a tinfoil website. But interesting

    https://californiaglobe.com/section-...ined-by-state/

    Facing Dry Year, CA State Water Board is Draining California Reservoirs
    CA reservoirs were designed to provide a steady five year supply for all users, and were filled to the top in June 2019
    By Katy Grimes, May 21, 2021 2:20 am

    “In the last 14 days, 90% of Delta inflow went to sea. It’s equal to a year’s supply of water for 1 million people.
    #ManMadeDrought,” Central Valley farmer Kristi Diener said.

    Diener, a California water expert and farmer, has been warning steadily that water is unnecessarily being let out to sea as the state faces a normal dry year.

    “Are we having a dry year? Yes,” Diener says. “That is normal for us. Should we be having water shortages in the start of our second dry year? No. Our reservoirs were designed to provide a steady five year supply for all users, and were filled to the top in June 2019.”

    Even San Francisco is suing the State Water Board. Diener explains:

    The State Water Board’s 40% unimpaired flows plan is too radical. Requiring 40% of the Tuolumne River water to flow directly to the ocean without being used for anything else on its way, severely limits that river’s supply to Hetch Hetchy—the main water source for San Francisco.

    The State Water Board has become the Department of Fish and Wildlife?

    The Water Board has said they want to experimentally see if over time they can bring back about 1000 salmon, but it is such an extreme idea that some residents could be limited to as little as 7 gallons of water per person per day during back to back dry years, essentially making these regions uninhabitable. Doug Obegi of the NRDC, along with other well funded nonprofits, have unleashed a barrage of negative press harshly criticizing the city, and chiding them for what they call ”being on the same side as Valley farmers.” But S.F. is not backing down on opposing the plan which gained approval by the cheerleading of Felicia Marcus, former State Water Resources Control Board Chair and NRDC attorney.

    Deja vu: In 2018, we addressed the California Water Resources Control Board and lawmakers’ charges of its misplaced priorities:

    As chairwoman of the California Water Resources Control Board, Felicia Marcus oversees a massive state bureaucracy with a $1 billion annual budget.

    In a prescient op ed today (2018) in the Modesto Bee, Assemblyman Adam Gray (D-Merced) had some harsh words for Marcus and her radical environmental cohorts. “Despite her promises to the contrary, she and her board have used their immense authority to jeopardize – not protect – the economy and drinking water supplies of the Northern San Joaquin Valley.”

    Gray says, “The State Water Board claims it needs the water to help restore fish populations, but an earlier version of their own report suggested their plan would result in little more than an additional 1,000 fish per year.”
    "Tinfoil"? Yeah, maybe ..... https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/california-globe/

    I generally support Ag, but not the "all the waters are MINE" shit. If you can't share equitably, then you you don't deserve ANY water.

  12. #137
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    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    Dantheman--supposedly there's a small aquifer that sits under the upper part of Squaw Valley and only under Squaw property. Whether this is true or not I don't know.
    Totally plausible in that setting where you have glacial sediment sitting on bedrock in an alpine glacial valley.

    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    CA's regulation of groundwater is baffling to me. I know it is changing, but treating GW as, essentially, a riparian system separate from the prior appropriation surface system is fucking nuts.
    Yes, completely insane.

    Quote Originally Posted by brutah View Post
    Do Utards have to give their prayer water to the sinners downstream?

    Here's governor cox asking everyone to pray for rain to solve our dought that bunny linked above for those that don't have fb:

    Even by Utah standards this is bananas.

  13. #138
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    Sep 2005
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    Fresh Lake City
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Even by Utah standards this is bananas.
    Cox may be one of the most amazing gaslighters in modern-day politics and that's saying a lot. Good thing all the late night hosts have this week off cause they'd be having a field day over this clown.

    Name:  pray for rain.png
Views: 436
Size:  215.9 KB

    Maybe we can use our ouija boards next to combat air pollution?

  14. #139
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Montrose, CO
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    3,350
    To be fair...the only things I pray for these days are rain and snow.

    Things are dire here in western CO. Meanwhile my fucking neighbor waters his lawn every single day at 4pm, Trump sign still displayed proudly.

  15. #140
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Keep Tacoma Feared
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    2,107
    This article in the Atlantic suggests the federal government should start buying up ranchland in upper Klamath and give it to the Klamath tribe to restore as wetland and fish habitat. Makes the argument that this would actually be cheaper than the money feds spend right now paying farmers when they can't farm due to water restrictions.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...nflict/619109/

    $23 mill gets you this prime ranchland:

    https://www.wilksranchbrokers.com/pr...e-river-ranch/

  16. #141
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    Oct 2004
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    50 miles E of Paradise
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    11,289
    How prime will that ranch be when the rains/snows quit coming and the Sprague's flows crap out?
    Check Out Ullr's Mobile Avalanche Safety Tools for iOS and Android
    www.ullrlabs.com

  17. #142
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    Nov 2008
    Location
    Edge of the Great Basin
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    Amid mega-drought, rightwing militia stokes water rebellion in US west

    Fears of a confrontation between law enforcement and rightwing militia supporters over the control of water in the drought-stricken American west have been sparked by protests at Klamath Falls in Oregon.

    Protesters affiliated with rightwing anti-government activist Ammon Bundy’s People’s Rights Network are threatening to break a deadlock over water management in the area by unilaterally opening the headgates of a reservoir.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/..._b-aplnews_d-1

  18. #143
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    Nov 2008
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    Well hell; just like the sun rising in the East, Bundy's spirit arises to aid the myopic and religiously entitled.

    Edit: Fucking LUNDY?!?!? That's more common than BUNDY for crissake!!???!! Fuck you AI overlords!.
    Last edited by PB; 06-10-2021 at 07:00 PM.

  19. #144
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    Sep 2006
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    5,607
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Totally plausible in that setting where you have glacial sediment sitting on bedrock in an alpine glacial valley.



    Yes, completely insane.



    Even by Utah standards this is bananas.
    It's more than just b-a-n-a-n-a-s. It's a whole other level of incompetence. Oh, right. Almost forgot. Thoughts and prayers ++++
    "We don't beat the reaper by living longer, we beat the reaper by living well and living fully." - Randy Pausch

  20. #145
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    Jan 2005
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    Keep Tacoma Feared
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    From NYTimes. Years are not showing up but upper left is 2021 and bottom right is 2020. Darker the red, the drier. Some other interesting graphs in the article:



    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...gtype=Homepage

  21. #146
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    Jun 2007
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    Cruzing
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    11,153
    ^^^^2002 at the bottom.

  22. #147
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    Nov 2008
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    6,311
    2 and 0s ...... so confusing.

  23. #148
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    Aug 2006
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    6,463
    SPI is closing public access to their lands due to drought and wildfire potential: https://spi-ind.com/OurForests/RecreationAccess

  24. #149
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    Nov 2008
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    6,311
    A map of their closed lands would be nice. Can't blame them for closing though.

  25. #150
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    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
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    17,556
    All national forest lands in California closed last summer. I would expect the same this summer--nearly all the hiking and backpacking in the mountains.

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