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  1. #1
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    Nokian Rotiiva AT tires - anyone here used?

    Anyone here use (or used in the past) the Nokina Rotiiva AT truck tire? 3PMSF rated, Nokian describes as "all season" but it looks to me more like a mild/moderate A/T tread.

    https://www.nokiantires.com/all-weat...tiiva-at-plus/

    Curious how well it does in snow.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  2. #2
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    Really good. Drove the TransCanada from YYC to Rogers pass and QE2 a lot in these on a lighter truck (taco)

    Better icey road performance than a Toyo at2





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  3. #3
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    I had a different nokian AT tire, Vatiiva I think? It did ok but wore down pretty fast was my recollection.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
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  4. #4
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    It is labeled as a summer tire in my neck of the woods (Norway).

    I currently run them on my 87 VW T3 Syncro, but I have zero intentions of ever using them on snow/during winter if I can avoid it. No ABS brakes for my trusty old steed alas, so studded tires for winter and Disco M/S for the rest of the year might very well be where I end up.

    I know that tires are labeled way differently over yonder, but Rotiiva will get you by in a pinch (light snowfall), but not as primary tires in snow rich, consistently cold (during winter) conditions imho.

  5. #5
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    I'm casually browsing -- this tire popped up, and is fairly cheap in the size I'll need. Considering it for use as a winter tire on a 2nd set of wheels, even though it's not a true winter tire. I live between Tahoe and Reno, and a true winter tire is a bit of luxury overkill for my use. A 3PMSF rated tire, or even a good all-season with deep tread (like a Michelin LTX or Defender) works fine.

    I'm amused though at the first 3 responses....

    1) Canada: works great in winter!
    2) Colorado: it's OK.
    3) Norway: we call those "summer tires" around here.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  6. #6
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    snicker

    To be clear, Nokian flat out states that they are inappropriate for winter use in Scandinavia. I checked (and re-checked) as buying tires was pretty far down on the list of stuff I wanted to spend money on - owning a T3 is expensive enough as is

    I have never been to Tahoe/Reno, but Colorado is very different to my neck of the woods. From what I can recall from when I lived there the climate and the snow is a lot drier with big cycles dumping snow up high (overnight), but leaving the main roads and surrounding terrain for the most part passable - at least after being plowed (besides all the wrecks and out-of-staters on summer tires doing less than perfect).

    The snow where I live is usually a lot moister, stays on the ground for longer and generally makes for a pretty slushy, salty slippfest during the more challenging days - especially after a re-freeze. Or you get true pow, aka a shitload of dry snow that turns into mush through being driven on and/or being salted. So pretty challenging conditions, way more than four wheel / all wheel drive can negate, hence the need for dedicated snow tires. Hell, over here there are different tires that do well on the coast compared to in land - Continental vs Hakkapelita.

    So if you live in CO type climate they will prob be ok, as long as you ride the conditions, over here - not so much

  7. #7
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    I went ahead and bought a set. IDK about their pricing on other sizes, but Walmart's price on the size I need is ~ $90 less per tire than Discount Tire currently -- $158 ea in a 275/70/18 LR E.
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Nokian-Ro...sn_dis_ov_entp

    These will be my "winter tire" set on a Ford F350.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    I'm casually browsing -- this tire popped up, and is fairly cheap in the size I'll need. Considering it for use as a winter tire on a 2nd set of wheels, even though it's not a true winter tire. I live between Tahoe and Reno, and a true winter tire is a bit of luxury overkill for my use. A 3PMSF rated tire, or even a good all-season with deep tread (like a Michelin LTX or Defender) works fine.

    I'm amused though at the first 3 responses....

    1) Canada: works great in winter!
    2) Colorado: it's OK.
    3) Norway: we call those "summer tires" around here.
    To be fair, I was discussing a different Nokian AT tire with the snowflake.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    To be fair, I was discussing a different Nokian AT tire with the snowflake.
    I know. But the disparity in responses was too good to overlook...
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  10. #10
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    I have them on my work truck (crew cab short bed Tacoma), and they're quite good in slush, fresh snow, and packed snow that hasn't been too polished by traffic. On true ice and greasy packed snow, they reveal their AT bias: you really need to leave plenty of space for braking and slow down for turns. You won't confuse them with a Hakk, but they're also a hell of a lot better on dirt/gravel/mild off roading.
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  11. #11
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    That is pretty interesting Glade and good to know - thanks for chiming in

    Does anybody have any experiences with Cooper Discoverer A/T3 Sport 2s for the same use as described above?

    I am contemplating making the switch - primarily to get something that is a bit more narrower (205/80r16s instead of 235/70r16s) - so should look a bit worse/less beefy, but should perform better. They would be paired with a set of studded Hakka C3s of the same size for full on winter use as soon as I can source an extra set of rims.

  12. #12
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    I've those c00pers on my 94 Toyota pick up and have been pleased with the performance. They've done well in snow (not deep snow), icey conditions, and rain. The wear has also been good. Had them three winters, now.

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kid-kapow View Post
    That is pretty interesting Glade and good to know - thanks for chiming in

    Does anybody have any experiences with Cooper Discoverer A/T3 Sport 2s for the same use as described above?

    I am contemplating making the switch - primarily to get something that is a bit more narrower (205/80r16s instead of 235/70r16s) - so should look a bit worse/less beefy, but should perform better. They would be paired with a set of studded Hakka C3s of the same size for full on winter use as soon as I can source an extra set of rims.
    They're great. I run them year-round on a beater T100 that I use for hauling a snowmobile or driving in the woods. I also had a set on my last Suburban. Seemingly less road noise than the BFG ATs that are one my 3/4 ton pickup.

  14. #14
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    sweet - great new - thanks for chiming in CallMeAl and Viva, much appreciated!

  15. #15
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    Nokian Rotiiva AT tires - anyone here used?

    BFG ATs are the most over-rated tire in existence.

    They’re expensive as fuck.
    They suck at both extremes.

    Maybe it’s an okay dry land tire on gravel. Jack of all trades, master of none. And even Jack has a limp dick.

    I have no experience with Nokian.

    But for studless snow tires my ranking follows—

    Bridgestone
    Yokohama
    Michelin

    This is JP. I’ve been on studless tires for 15 years of winters.

    BFG do not deserve a spot in this conversation. I grew up with BFG ATs as a do-it-all solution for my Tahoe life in my K5 Blazer. And my Jeep.

    I hate that tire.

  16. #16
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    hehe, why don't you really tell us how you feel

    Agreed though - I too have found BFG ATs to be a bit of a liability on snow/ice. I had a pair on a LR 110 and they were slipperier than greased eal on snow. No good at all, even if they were ok for everything else. Everything else about that car kinda sucked though, even if it did look smashing and it was a ton of fun driving offroad. It was just needlessly outdated, underpowered and liable to have the engine or gearbox explode on you at the 100 - 150k mark. Yay.

    And just to be clear, the only reason I consider studded over unstudded winter tires is since the car they will go on is a 1987 VW T3 Syncro aka no ABS. As such the extra grip could be worth it in certain conditions, even if running them would add expenses (fees due to running them in certain areas). I might go for Hakka CR3 instead come to think on it, aka a similar tire without studs. Time will tell.

    I think the Coopers will be more than sufficient as an all year tire for most uses though and I have very good experiences with their (perhaps not directly ) predecessors - Discoverer M+Ss. Still, something even more dedicated to snow will be nice for those deep winter missions.

    I have exceedingly good experiences with various Nokian Hakka studless tires in interior/drier regions, while Continental winter tires are widely considered to be ahead of the pack for wetter, coastal climates during winter - at least by a lot of folks on the west coast.

  17. #17
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    Made a good Reno winter/at tire... probably a fine CO tire if you cannot maintain a separate set of snows. Not super impressed with ice performance... the winter tire thread said that they are good when they have a lot of tread but performance falls off.

    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    BFG ATs are the most over-rated tire in existence.

    They’re expensive as fuck.
    They suck at both extremes.

    Maybe it’s an okay dry land tire on gravel. Jack of all trades, master of none. And even Jack has a limp dick.

    I have no experience with Nokian.

    But for studless snow tires my ranking follows—

    Bridgestone
    Yokohama
    Michelin

    This is JP. I’ve been on studless tires for 15 years of winters.

    BFG do not deserve a spot in this conversation. I grew up with BFG ATs as a do-it-all solution for my Tahoe life in my K5 Blazer. And my Jeep.

    I hate that tire.
    SPOT ON!
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  18. #18
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    My experience with the cooper at-w was that winter performance dropped after the first winter (originally installed as a winter began), even with a good amount of thread left. I stopped using them during winter 2 seasons ago. Fwiw, my at-w are on their last leg and some blocks have torn off.

    People criticizing the bfg, is your experienced only based on the older model or also based on the newer T/A2 (I think that’s the model name)? I’ve never used bfg’s.

  19. #19
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    Nokian Rotiiva AT tires - anyone here used?

    The older one. The tread looks the same on the newer one. Is the sidewall thread the only improvement?

    I can’t win this argument with my dad. He still buys them for his trucks in Reno and has never tried anything else. He drives over the passes daily.

    “Dad, bite the bullet and invest in two sets of tires. In the long run, it’s the same price and the two will drastically out-perform the BFG.”

    “Yeah, I don’t believe you.”

    I might have daddy issues with that BFG, I guess. I grew up with that BFG on my rig for a solid ten years believing it was the one. Then life changed and I discovered a different approach to tires— Two seasons of rotation.

    I’ve been rotating winter and summer tires for fifteen years now and I stand by my daddy-issue claim that the BFG All Terrain T/A is a piece of shit. It sucks in the summer and it sucks in the winter. Maybe it doesn’t suck on gravel roads.

    So if you live in who-gives-a-fuck USA and the majority of your life is driving gravel or farmland then the BFG All Terrain is probably for you.

    If you drive on roads, over passes, and deal with seasons of either ice or dry (or rainy),then buy two sets and stop fucking around.
    Last edited by gaijin; 06-12-2021 at 04:53 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
    My experience with the cooper at-w was that winter performance dropped after the first winter...
    yeah, that Cooper tires' winter performance deteriorate faster than tires from other brands is a well known issue with Coopers - that is, I've heard/read it multiple times before. Oh well.

    Thanks for sharing your experiences with the tire regardless

  21. #21
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    KO2s in the summer, studded Hakks in the winter seems to work well for me. I will probably try a different AT tire when the KO2s wear out, but at this point, they have over 60,000 miles on them, and still have over half the tread depth remaining. I'll probably end up replacing them because of age and not because they're worn out. They would last 100,000 miles on my car. Hard to complain about a tire with that sort of treadlife.

    They've handled everything from 90mph highway blasts through Eastern Washington, Montana and Utah, to torrential rain in the Olympics, and some light off-roading in the San Juans (pro-tip: Black Bear and Imogene passes make for a nice route, but I recommend bringing a spotter or a vehicle with a very tight turning radius. I had neither).

    I also find them to be marginally quieter than the Nokian Rotiivas on my work truck.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post



    I might have daddy issues with that BFG, I guess. I grew up with that BFG on my rig for a solid ten years believing it was the one. Then life changed and I discovered a different approach to tires— Two seasons of rotation.

    I’ve been rotating winter and summer tires for fifteen years now and I stand by my daddy-issue claim that the BFG All Terrain T/A is a piece of shit. It sucks in the summer and it sucks in the winter. Maybe it doesn’t suck on gravel roads.

    So if you live in who-gives-a-fuck USA and the majority of your life is driving gravel or farmland then the BFG All Terrain is probably for you.

    If you drive on roads, over passes, and deal with seasons of either ice or dry (or rainy),then buy two sets and stop fucking around.
    5 months of snow up here, even in town you gotta run snows, most people go studded, shelling out for snow tires on steel rims is a lot of money up front but then you don't buy any tires for a long time and you don't pay for change over so its the cheapest way to run snows. You can sell or trade the rims and snows if you change vehicals often
    Last edited by XXX-er; 06-12-2021 at 10:12 AM.
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  23. #23
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    I ran the older Nakian Vativa e-rated tire on my Duramax. It looks like the Rotiiva is an updated version of the Vativa.
    They performed much better in the snow than the BFG A/T that I replaced them with. I get that they aren't a dedicated winter tire, but the winter performance was a lot better than most AT tires at the time.
    They weren't the greatest off road though. I wouldn't take them in the mud without a friend with a tow strap. Rocky/gravel driving was fine though. And surprisingly quiet for a e-rated 33" tire too.
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