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  1. #1
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    Riding With The Pup

    I have never ridden with my dog before, I have always figured it wasn't worth the hassle (I haven't had a dog in over 9 years). Now I have a new pup and live in an area where a quick lunchtime ride at Hartmans is always in play.
    I am looking for any and all advice about getting out with the pooch. What should I know? I am worried about her darting in front of me and killing us all!
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  2. #2
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    That is definitely a real concern. Mine got in front of me once and then had the wisdom to run across the landing of the jump as I was in the air. That was the end of my riding for a month or so, couple of cracked ribs. I guess the moral of the story is, don't let them get faster than you.

    I've gotten to the point where I have dog rides and non-dog rides, the dog rides I'm not usually riding aggressively at all, just cruising around and giving them plenty of space.

  3. #3
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    If you've already trained with a shock/beep collar, it can be super useful for the whole out in front thing. Both of my dogs more or less figured it out, but I've had a few mishaps. Once I was riding with my buddy and my dog cut a switchback from behind my buddy to in front of him. Came blasting around the turn to the dog just chilling and scared the shit out of him lol.

  4. #4
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    Subscribed. Got a dog a month ago after a lifetime without one. I've only been running with him so far. dfinn recommended this collar in another thread and I picked one up: https://www.amazon.com/Nite-Ize-Radd.../dp/B07MBHWT23 Haven't used it yet but it seems pretty slick for when you need a leash just for the parking lot and such.

  5. #5
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    Train your dog with hip leash then clip the leash to your seat rails until they learn to stay behind you.
    what's orange and looks good on hippies?
    fire

    rails are for trains
    If I had a dollar for every time capitalism was blamed for problems caused by the government I'd be a rich fat film maker in a baseball hat.

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  6. #6
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    I will be attempting this soon as well and looking for some pointers as well...

    2yo Cardi - Her recall is good but not great, training has been challenging because she has ZERO food motivation and much prefers the company of other pups to humans. She is great off leash on a hike, throwing the ball at the park... but I can see challenges at one of our busy trailheads...

    We've done some test rides through the neighborhood. She tracks me well enough. It helps that she is a natural herder.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by waxman View Post
    Train your dog with hip leash then clip the leash to your seat rails until they learn to stay behind you.
    Holy shit, seriously?!
    I love dogs, don't currently have one but used to occasionally ride with my dog, not a fan of seeing dogs on the trails, and the above comments seem to verify that. Seems like too many ways for dogs or people to get hurt. And it seems like a lot of people push their dogs too far, so the dog starts lagging behind, and dogs don't know how to yield, so now people (like me) that aren't riding with a dog gotta figure out how to dodge your mutt. As always, more of a people problem than a dog problem. Not saying don't do, but if you do, think about the dog's limits, and about which trails would be more appropriate with regards to other users. If/when I get another dog, I would probably avoid taking it on rides other than a quick local rides that are more like walks with a bike.
    ďI really lack the words to compliment myself today.Ē - Alberto Tomba

  8. #8
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    It ainít rocket surgery. Go on a few non-jump uncrowded rides, and see how it goes. Bring treats and water.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
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  9. #9
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    Dec 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm...pow! View Post
    Holy shit, seriously?!
    I love dogs, don't currently have one but used to occasionally ride with my dog, not a fan of seeing dogs on the trails, and the above comments seem to verify that. Seems like too many ways for dogs or people to get hurt. And it seems like a lot of people push their dogs too far, so the dog starts lagging behind, and dogs don't know how to yield, so now people (like me) that aren't riding with a dog gotta figure out how to dodge your mutt. As always, more of a people problem than a dog problem. Not saying don't do, but if you do, think about the dog's limits, and about which trails would be more appropriate with regards to other users. If/when I get another dog, I would probably avoid taking it on rides other than a quick local rides that are more like walks with a bike.
    Hey, it worked for us. Of course she is/was well trained and has excellent recall. Once on actual trails the leash came off and she was just another trail user. The seat rail trick works much better than the leash in the hand on the handlebar when the untrained dog sees a "SQUIRREL!" and flips you over the bars.
    what's orange and looks good on hippies?
    fire

    rails are for trains
    If I had a dollar for every time capitalism was blamed for problems caused by the government I'd be a rich fat film maker in a baseball hat.

    www.theguideshut.ca

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by teleee View Post
    I have never ridden with my dog before, I have always figured it wasn't worth the hassle (I haven't had a dog in over 9 years). Now I have a new pup and live in an area where a quick lunchtime ride at Hartmans is always in play.
    I am looking for any and all advice about getting out with the pooch. What should I know? I am worried about her darting in front of me and killing us all!
    I'd honestly be 1000x more worried about the dog getting bitten by a rattlesnake at Hartmans. You're talking about Hartman's Rocks in Gunnison, right? Dog - rattle snake bites suck. But I don't really know shit about where you are. CO Front Range has me skeert. One of my pups got bit in Ft Collins.
    Lots of Cream, Lots of Sugar

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    If you've already trained with a shock/beep collar, it can be super useful for the whole out in front thing. Both of my dogs more or less figured it out, but I've had a few mishaps. Once I was riding with my buddy and my dog cut a switchback from behind my buddy to in front of him. Came blasting around the turn to the dog just chilling and scared the shit out of him lol.
    You have a shock collar recommendation? I've used a $30 version from Amazon with minimal success. My guy is well behaved 99% of the time. The other 1% of the time he is 100% unresponsive and quickly gets out of range of the cheap collars.
    Lots of Cream, Lots of Sugar

  12. #12
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    Following this thread because I wanna do the same. If anyone has some backwater/less-frequented trail recommendations by me where I can stretch my pup's legs a bit, please DM me. Every trail I know and ride has way too many other riders on it.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    I'd honestly be 1000x more worried about the dog getting bitten by a rattlesnake at Hartmans. You're talking about Hartman's Rocks in Gunnison, right? Dog - rattle snake bites suck. But I don't really know shit about where you are. CO Front Range has me skeert. One of my pups got bit in Ft Collins.
    The only rattlesnake at Hartman's is a ripping piece of trail, have no fear.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    You have a shock collar recommendation? I've used a $30 version from Amazon with minimal success. My guy is well behaved 99% of the time. The other 1% of the time he is 100% unresponsive and quickly gets out of range of the cheap collars.
    Sorry, not much help, we have a cheap one. Neither of my dogs tend to stray too far so it does the job. The one in the post above though is a 1%er though like you mentioned so I get that. After a lot of trying unfortunately I just don't ride with him much anymore.

  15. #15
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    Used el cheapo x 3. Finally broke down and bought a sportdog - sport trainer 875.... hear good things and better than our old ones which had maybe a 100ft range.




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  16. #16
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    Our local trails have become too crowded to feel okay taking my dog out and heís too old anyway now. A few thoughts...if you can teach your dog a good heel, that is great for riding. Really watch temps and the dogs output. They can overheat really fast as they donít know when to rest and will do whatever they can to keep up with you. It can happen on mid 70s spring days. Start easy on softer trails. They need to build their pads up. Donít run them hard until theyíre a little older like 1 to 2. They can wreck their joints fast and it will cause problems down the road. Take some poo bags and a zip lock to put them in.

    Itís super fun but I found dog rides were more to hang with the dog and less about the ride. Iíve got a four month old pup who I thing is going to be a ripper and canít wait for next season to take him out.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    You have a shock collar recommendation? I've used a $30 version from Amazon with minimal success. My guy is well behaved 99% of the time. The other 1% of the time he is 100% unresponsive and quickly gets out of range of the cheap collars.
    I run the sportdog 425xs. It's in their field trainer line. Many settings that allow for customized use for your dogs specific needs. It has a 500 yard range and is waterproof and basically bombproof for dogs that beat up cheap collars. Can't recommend it enough.

  18. #18
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    Oct 2010
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    Dogtra also has a good e-collar. One with GPS capability might be nice too in case they run off after a deer or something.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    You have a shock collar recommendation? I've used a $30 version from Amazon with minimal success. My guy is well behaved 99% of the time. The other 1% of the time he is 100% unresponsive and quickly gets out of range of the cheap collars.
    We use ecollar branded "shock" collars and they are a total game changer. It's a totally different thing than the cheaper $30 shock collars - they're designed to produce an extremely low level stimulus that the dog learns to associate with your commands. Unlike cheaper shock collars, ecollar aren't designed or intended to cause pain, so when used properly (it takes ~a month of work with you and the dog to learn how to use them well), the dog associates the ecollar with GOOD things. Ecollars are so well thought of that they are used and recommended by most dog trainers, so finding an ecollar class is super easy - most trainers teach them. The real trick is in using the ecollar consistently to reinforce good behavior; we went pretty much a whole month where every interaction with our dogs was proceeded by an extremely low level reminder (following the protocol of first a command, then an ecollar nudge, then a reward/praise).

    They are expensive; the base model has 1/2 a mile range (other models go up to a mile) and costs $180, but they last forever and they're very well built. We've had ours for 4 years now and we've used them probably close to 250 times - they're great. We've definitely gotten our money's worth out of them.

    Just went on my first ride with my dog, I trust her 100% when she is on her ecollar. Her recall is perfect, which is incredible given how strong her prey drive is (she'll chase deer for miles, but the second I ask her to come back/buzz her, she runs back smiling)

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  20. #20
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    Here is a link to the thing itself:

    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B007RBDU...6GZK50YSE4G3B4

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conundrum View Post
    Our local trails have become too crowded to feel okay taking my dog out and heís too old anyway now. A few thoughts...if you can teach your dog a good heel, that is great for riding. Really watch temps and the dogs output. They can overheat really fast as they donít know when to rest and will do whatever they can to keep up with you. It can happen on mid 70s spring days. Start easy on softer trails. They need to build their pads up. Donít run them hard until theyíre a little older like 1 to 2. They can wreck their joints fast and it will cause problems down the road. Take some poo bags and a zip lock to put them in.

    Itís super fun but I found dog rides were more to hang with the dog and less about the ride. Iíve got a four month old pup who I thing is going to be a ripper and canít wait for next season to take him out.
    I'll echo this and add that if you are having trouble with the dog getting in front, a little gentle buzz from the front tire is an effective negative reinforcement. Obviously don't roll over the dog, just a little love tap.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    The only rattlesnake at Hartman's is a ripping piece of trail, have no fear.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yea, that is the only rattlesnake I fear at Hartmans, it bit me hard last fall! One of the best things about this area is no fricking rattlers!
    Tons of good advice on here keep it coming. As dfinn said there are dog rides and non dog rides, I am really just looking for the mellow kind where we can go burn off some of her energy on a quick ride. I like the ecollar idea, I am going to have to look into that.
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    You have a shock collar recommendation? I've used a $30 version from Amazon with minimal success. My guy is well behaved 99% of the time. The other 1% of the time he is 100% unresponsive and quickly gets out of range of the cheap collars.
    +1 sportdog 425 is a good one
    we have two dogs/collars on one radio unit

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by geomorph View Post
    I'll echo this and add that if you are having trouble with the dog getting in front, a little gentle buzz from the front tire is an effective negative reinforcement. Obviously don't roll over the dog, just a little love tap.
    And if you do roll over your dog, +6" of travel makes it safer for everyone.

  25. #25
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    Fuck all the beepers, collars, and leashes for training. Train your dog with a DHF. Put that tire squarely into his asshole a few times and he will very quickly learn to watch out for bikes and stay either behind you or well in front of you. Encourage your friends to do the same, so he knows it's everyone that he has to watch out for. I like to yell "heads up" just before the buzz - good to have audible cues.

    Aside from that, keep an eye on their paws. Lots of desert riding, especially when it's hot, is really hard on their pads. If he tears a pad off it'll suck for both you and him.

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