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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Santa Cruz, CA
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    490

    Mountain Flow Eco Wax

    Anyone else find their wax incredibly hard to scrape? Itís tough to the point where I have to use a metal scraper - my usual plastic one doesnít stand a chance at getting this stuff off.

    I thought maybe it was because I was waxing outside in cold-ish temps, but I did a pair today in about 60-degree sunshine. Same story. I guess itís still worth it to not be breathing in fluorocarbons, but damn.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    BC
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    That blows, I haven’t given their stuff a shot yet. Also a metal scraper is probably ruining your base bevel

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
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    490
    Quote Originally Posted by mr_pretzel View Post
    That blows, I haven’t given their stuff a shot yet. Also a metal scraper is probably ruining your base bevel
    Meh. I was worried about gouging my bases the first time I used the metal scraper, but it's all good. I've never been that picky about my tune, bevel, etc. anyway. It's just annoying and time consuming more than anything.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
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    1,495
    Itís a little sticky. A sharp plastic scrapper and shorter strokes work. In between a few scrapes I clean the edges of the plastic scrapper with the metal one. This wax is a little more work than conventional wax to get off, but i managed to do a few good tunes with it. Took an extra half beer for sure.
    24į 06į

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Canukistan
    Posts
    246

    Mountain Flow Eco Wax

    No experience with this wax but generally harder to scrap waxís are typically for colder temps and last better on abrasive refrozen snow. In the Swix line blue(~-6 to -10 degC) scraps harder than purple (~ -4 to -7) and then green ( -10 and colder )even harder than blue

    Maybe you got the extra cold temp version of their wax?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    490
    Itís their ďall season,Ē 8F-30F. Might be worth taking a belt sander to my plastic scraper to get a bit better edge on it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    The greatest N. New Mexico resort in Colorado
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    1,647
    Sharp scraper for sure. It's a little tough to work with but I think it's got the best range of any hippie wax I've used. Saving the planet is hard work, man.

    I do wish they'd give us an idea of what plant waxes they are using, I assume carnauba since it's hard but who knows.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    21,570
    I sharpen a pair of scrapers every single time I wax. It takes a few seconds and makes for great results. I have an old multi angle edger. 0 degrees with a panzar file.
    And then yeah. Some waxes are just harder to scrape then others. Purl's spring wax seems a little hard, but the store was out of One Ball Jay. Not the best slush wax I've ever had. Even with some graphite mixed in.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    ec molehills
    Posts
    78
    I stopped scraping this season since Iím living in a condo and didnít want the mess. Instead I iron on as little wax as possible, then remove it with a paper towel or fibertex under the iron at a high temp. The wax melts and the extra is absorbed by the towel. No scraping and no mess. I learned about the technique on that other ski forum.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by stevied View Post
    I stopped scraping this season since I’m living in a condo and didn’t want the mess. Instead I iron on as little wax as possible, then remove it with a paper towel or fibertex under the iron at a high temp. The wax melts and the extra is absorbed by the towel. No scraping and no mess. I learned about the technique on that other ski forum.
    This is interesting. I've tried a couple of times to use less - just enough to incorporate with the base but not enough to need to scrape - but I felt like I couldn't get it to spread thin enough to work. I'll give the paper towel strategy a shot next time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by burrito View Post
    This is interesting. I've tried a couple of times to use less - just enough to incorporate with the base but not enough to need to scrape - but I felt like I couldn't get it to spread thin enough to work. I'll give the paper towel strategy a shot next time.

    I dunno about paper towel method, but this method with Fibertex works really well.
    Actually, i do a quick rub on with a cold wax block and then do the quick "hot crayon" application and then fibertex it off immediately. Maybe a smidge of scraping and brushing afterwards.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by mr_pretzel View Post
    That blows, I haven’t given their stuff a shot yet. Also a metal scraper is probably ruining your base bevel
    Basic geometry does not support that you are changing the base edge bevel.
    Like others have said make sure your scraper is sharp. Just recently purchased a brand new scraper that was duller than a butter knife.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Where homo sapiens have outgrown their use.
    Posts
    8,078
    They somehow managed to come up with a name for their product that is even more irksome than One Ball Jay. Impressive work; won't be buying their stuff.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Among Greatness All Around
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    5,720
    A few tips that may work (have not used that, but cold waxes over the years are similar.)

    First if you have a new plastic scraper, try it and if it works, then the old one needs a good sharpening. Then instead of a heavy drip and having to iron and scrape a lot of wax off, try the crayon method (use the iron to touch the wax and then rub up the ski, cover or just a heavy and hard rub of the wax bar directly on the ski cold and then hit the bar on the iron a few times so you have hot wax on the iron to fill in. Other thing you can do is hot wax normally, then heat the wax up one more time just before scraping and wait until it becomes just white milky and not fully hardened again.

    Scraping angle- try different degrees to see if holding it a but higher or lower than the normal 45 degree. Metal scraper to get the higher areas off first couple of passes...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
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    21,570
    Quote Originally Posted by stevied View Post
    I stopped scraping this season since Iím living in a condo and didnít want the mess. Instead I iron on as little wax as possible, then remove it with a paper towel or fibertex under the iron at a high temp. The wax melts and the extra is absorbed by the towel. No scraping and no mess. I learned about the technique on that other ski forum.
    Rub on and cork.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    6,833
    Never even heard of it. The Swix CH wax I use is hard as a rock, the warmer temps a little better but you still basically have to brush them off. Scraper can only do so much. Buy a scraper sharpener.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    153
    ^ good tips

    With the ecowax I scrape, brush with a nylon roto brush, hit it with a hand held brass brush, wipe it down and usually repeat 1x. Sharp scraper is a must, the brass brush pulls out a lot of wax that the nylon misses. I like the idea of the product, but for now the trade off is it doesn't scrape nice like traditional waxes I've used & gunks up my tools. I think it skis nice enough as long as your scrape & brush it out enough.

    I bought a bar last season, once that's gone I don't know that I'd buy it again unless they make it easier to work with.
    Last edited by DSSK Jr. ; 04-04-2021 at 06:40 PM. Reason: after waxing a few pairs w/ it today...

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    178
    I didnít realize how dull my scrapers were until I bought a new one that had a edge.
    Running the scrapers through a guide with a Panzar underneath seemed like it was working, then I bought the Swix sharpener and realized it sucked.

    https://www.utahskigear.com/products...aper-sharpener

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by DSSK Jr. View Post
    ^ good tips

    With the ecowax I scrape, brush with a nylon roto brush, hit it with a hand held brass brush, wipe it down and usually repeat 1x. Sharp scraper is a must, the brass brush pulls out a lot of wax that the nylon misses. I like the idea of the product, but for now the trade off is it doesn't scrape nice like traditional waxes I've used & gunks up my tools. I think it skis nice enough. I'd buy it again...but I don't wax nearly as much as I used to so I'm ok with the extra attention needed in scraping.
    I feel pretty much the same. When you scrape it, instead of being completely dry and flaky like traditional waxes it comes off a bit sticky. Not quite surf wax sticky, but you definitely have to clean off your scraper from time to time. I don't wax all that often (usually once a year, maybe twice, per pair of skis), so at the end of the day it's not that big of a deal - more annoying than it is a dealbreaker. Case in point, I've been skiing all year on a pair that I waxed in the fall and have never once thought that they needed another coat.

    I'd be curious to know if any shops have started using it. I could see it really being a hassle if you had to use this stuff a couple times a day, every day.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
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    That's not worth $180 to me. A vice that actually holds your skis or their bindings well, and something to work as a block under the shovel (and tail if needed) sets you up for good wax removal.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    47
    I thought it was just me or my scraping style.

    I will say I used EcoWax for summer storage last year, and it seems like it really did a good job. But yeah couldnít get a clean scrape, so I just left some wax on there.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    That's not worth $180 to me. A vice that actually holds your skis or their bindings well, and something to work as a block under the shovel (and tail if needed) sets you up for good wax removal.
    I agree with you on that.

    I got it for less than half in a trade. Still overpriced but it makes a difference. I use a lasso clamp through the brake and my skis donít move.

    https://www.slidewright.com/tools4bo...asso-clamp.php

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BC
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    1,255
    Quote Originally Posted by Lostintime View Post
    Basic geometry does not support that you are changing the base edge bevel.
    Like others have said make sure your scraper is sharp. Just recently purchased a brand new scraper that was duller than a butter knife.
    Base bevel is convex. Using a metal scraper means you are removing base material making the ski flatter and loosing base bevel.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
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    9,066
    Quote Originally Posted by mr_pretzel View Post
    Base bevel is convex. Using a metal scraper means you are removing base material making the ski flatter and loosing base bevel.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Unless itís a sharp metal scraper with a freshly turned burr, youíre not removing base material scraping off wax. I use an old dull metal scraper to remove cold hard wax all the time. It would take a serious effort and a little stupidity to power right through the wax and start cutting base material


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
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    4,201
    I was using Eco Wax earlier this season, but didn't get great results from a glide standpoint. Switched to Hertzel Hot Sauce and I think it works much better. Also, I stopped doing the hot wax and just started using the crayon method, then buff it out with a ScotchBrite pad. It only lasts two or three days but it's really easy to remove whatever is left with lighter fluid, then a quick cloth with rubbing alcohol to clean off the fluid. Ready for another quick rub-on/buff-off. I feel like it glides pretty darn well considering how much easier it is than a hot wax and scrape. Anyway, I'm a noob at ski tuning so take this with a grain of salt.

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