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Thread: Garden 2021

  1. #101
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    @skidog - It looks like I might have missed on the no significant winter weather ahead, Thursday night/Friday I could get 4-5 inches. At least it looks like no hard freeze, temps might not even get below freezing.

    I'm gonna try to lay out a bed for corn tomorrow while the ground is good and wet from the inch of rain yesterday then let the snow settle it. I was only sorta successful with corn last year because my patches were too small and the wind beat up the stalks when they got to about 5 feet tall. I'm hoping to get about 10x20 but my yard is pretty rocky. How many cubic yards of soil would I need to cover that 6" thick?
    10x20=200 x .5 = 100 ft 3. A cubic yard is 3x3 =9. 9 into 100 = 11 cubic yards.

  2. #102
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Mike View Post
    10x20=200 x .5 = 100 ft 3. A cubic yard is 3x3 =9. 9 into 100 = 11 cubic yards.
    Missing a dimension on that cubic calculation. 3X3X3=27cubic ft per cubic yard. 100/27 is 3.7cubic yards

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    My front and side yard have no fence and get direct sun, would I be crazy to plant a few rows of corn as an interesting fence line? I know I would need to reinforce them somehow.

    In the back, in the 'new last year' raised beds I've got garlic coming up from last fall. Planted onions too but only a couple out of ~60 sprouted.

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    Added a bit of space by making the two raised rows into an H.

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    This is the bulk of the back. Pretty decent but too large raspberry section, then will have tomatoes and peppers at the front. Bush beans too, pole beans and cucumbers at the back. On the left is the new 'salad bowl' lol. I think it's getting a bit weird when you start naming your gardens but yeah.

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    Soil for the season.

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    Let's go!

  4. #104
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    Nov 2017
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    What a nice raised bed you got there, though I think you could have save a decent amount of wood if you cut those up.

  5. #105
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    I was guessing at about 4 yards, thanks BCM. Nice try Mike lol.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHarmon View Post
    What a nice raised bed you got there, though I think you could have save a decent amount of wood if you cut those up.
    Yeah fair comment. This came up in last years thread too. I have way too much wood than I'll ever need on site so it's a good way to use some of it, but I'd have more gardening space if I used a thinner material. I'm ok with the compromise.

  7. #107
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Yeah fair comment. This came up in last years thread too. I have way too much wood than I'll ever need on site so it's a good way to use some of it, but I'd have more gardening space if I used a thinner material. I'm ok with the compromise.
    How do you like those black fabric "basket" things? Ms Boissal got a bunch of them and she wants to use them for potatoes as our soil is so hard that they don't grow well and mounding constantly gets to be a problem.
    I'm a bit worried about how fast the soil with dry when surrounded by dark breathable fabric.
    "Your wife being mad is temporary, but pow turns do not get unmade" - mallwalker the wise

  8. #108
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    Jan 2016
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    I like their price and the convenience they offer. The first ones I bought last year seem to be in good shape still but I doubt they'll last much more than a few years. For the price not a big deal. I've had no issues with moisture loss, but some of them are on an automated irrigation system and I'm pretty hands on with water the other ones.

    That said I'm in a different climate then you are. And yeah, we're on clay soil which is pretty awful to deal with.

    Have you considered the potato grow bags? I started using those last year, they're taller than these fabric pots which seems to work well with taters.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    I like their price and the convenience they offer. The first ones I bought last year seem to be in good shape still but I doubt they'll last much more than a few years. For the price not a big deal. I've had no issues with moisture loss, but some of them are on an automated irrigation system and I'm pretty hands on with water the other ones.

    That said I'm in a different climate then you are. And yeah, we're on clay soil which is pretty awful to deal with.

    Have you considered the potato grow bags? I started using those last year, they're taller than these fabric pots which seems to work well with taters.
    Good info, thanks! We have a partial shade cloth thing over the baskets and they'll get their own watering system as I think the July August temps and lack of humidity would immediately cook any plant growing inside. I'll look into the potato bags. I texted Ms Boissal about it but she replied that she couldn't be bothered as she was in the middle of a photoshoot for the new babies. Which I found very confusing until she sent this:

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    Apparently the greenhouse doubles as a brooder to raise chicks. Those peppers aren't going to last long around the hungry little fuzzballs.
    "Your wife being mad is temporary, but pow turns do not get unmade" - mallwalker the wise

  10. #110
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    Jan 2016
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    Chickies!! Nice.

    See you in the 'I love my Wife and all' thread lol

  11. #111
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    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCMtnHound View Post
    Missing a dimension on that cubic calculation. 3X3X3=27cubic ft per cubic yard. 100/27 is 3.7cubic yards
    Thanks. Using my calculation the garden would have done great but he would have wasted a lot of money.

  12. #112
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    Sep 2010
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    Shuswap Highlands
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    4 yards is a tough number though. A nice tandem axle dump truck holds approx 10yards. 1/2 ton pickup about 1.5 yards. Moving earth isn't cheap.

    With the past few days in the mid 20's and nights above freezing, I couldn't resist digging in some dirt. Still a chunk of ice to melt however. Click image for larger version. 

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  13. #113
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    Apr 2004
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    That's why I usually buy bags. Well, that and if I go bulk it would get delivered 20 feet below where it's needed. If I have it in the back of our suv and I drive up the front lawn it's only 7 feet. 4 yards is too expensive in bags to make it worth it. Looks like it's time to upgrade the hoopty wheelbarrow.

  14. #114
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    Nov 2002
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    Behind the Zion Curtain
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    Been slowly working at it, carried a lot of bags of steer manure. Have peas, beets, lettuce, in the dirt a week ago. Put in 91 KQ and 40 red onions today. Been harvesting carrots from last year, as well as green onions that made it over the winter.

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    Part of the onion patch.

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    We planted a gang of potatoes, put them in a box that needs soil, should work well for mounding them.

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    My hops are doing well, thanks Dibs.

  15. #115
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    Mar 2017
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    ^^^your space is really beautiful, BobMC. well done man.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk

  16. #116
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    Feb 2005
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    15,863
    I onion laughed.

  17. #117
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    Nov 2002
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    Behind the Zion Curtain
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    Quote Originally Posted by MakersTeleMark View Post
    I onion laughed.
    I’m going to dehydrate the ever living shit out of those things. I hold forth on a lot of square footage, I’ve been working on growing shit I’ll use, onions being one of the the biggest usage.

    I propose a Wasatch garden tour. I’d like to see your gardens, I’ll bring the beer. Once we’re all vaxxed it’d be fun to see everyone’s spread. A revolving back yard tour, have a few drinks and get some ideas on how to garden.

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    1,666
    Quote Originally Posted by BCMtnHound View Post
    4 yards is a tough number though. A nice tandem axle dump truck holds approx 10yards. 1/2 ton pickup about 1.5 yards. Moving earth isn't cheap.

    With the past few days in the mid 20's and nights above freezing, I couldn't resist digging in some dirt. Still a chunk of ice to melt however. Click image for larger version. 

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    Oofh. My lower back can testify that 4 yards is a lot of shovelling in a day. Beds are just about turned in and ready to go. Broccoli should head out next week.

  19. #119
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    May 2007
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    Sandy, Utah
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    14,411
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    That's why I usually buy bags. Well, that and if I go bulk it would get delivered 20 feet below where it's needed. If I have it in the back of our suv and I drive up the front lawn it's only 7 feet. 4 yards is too expensive in bags to make it worth it. Looks like it's time to upgrade the hoopty wheelbarrow.
    5cu yards delivered about 60 min after ordered. Under $300. Don't know if that's good or not but it's what I paid.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app

  20. #120
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    Apr 2004
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    Southeast New York
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    Yeah bags are way too expensive for this project, they're usually 1.5 or 2 cu ft for $6-10. I need to do something though, I realized this morning that I need at least 100 sq ft more space for all of the seeds I still have plus a bed for corn.

  21. #121
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    Jan 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    5cu yards delivered about 60 min after ordered. Under $300. Don't know if that's good or not but it's what I paid.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    I'll play - I payed ~275 CAD for 4 yards of 'premium' garden soil delivered. Had the option of their 50/50 mix which would have been ~ 200 CAD.

  22. #122
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    Jul 2005
    Location
    Verdi NV
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    9,435
    Quote Originally Posted by BobMc View Post
    Been slowly working at it, carried a lot of bags of steer manure. Have peas, beets, lettuce, in the dirt a week ago. Put in 91 KQ and 40 red onions today. Been harvesting carrots from last year, as well as green onions that made it over the winter.

    Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	68 
Size:	1.03 MB 
ID:	371898

    Part of the onion patch.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	3D2A36BA-7204-4785-B038-C29E2E7B2BBB.jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	1.34 MB 
ID:	371899Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	61 
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ID:	371900

    We planted a gang of potatoes, put them in a box that needs soil, should work well for mounding them.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	C878F927-471D-4E39-B84D-06244E71D05E.jpg 
Views:	56 
Size:	1.30 MB 
ID:	371902

    My hops are doing well, thanks Dibs.
    That's impressive I suspect some of your neighbors hate you
    Own your fail. ~Jer~

  23. #123
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    86
    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Yeah fair comment. This came up in last years thread too. I have way too much wood than I'll ever need on site so it's a good way to use some of it, but I'd have more gardening space if I used a thinner material. I'm ok with the compromise.
    I see, well it looked good in your garden, planning to make two or three of those, with one spiral raised bed, just gonna have to plan them better first though.

  24. #124
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    Jan 2016
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    Is there any vegatable worth growing in smaller pots? I've got tons of ~ 1 or 2 gallon pots from previous hanging baskets at my disposal.

  25. #125
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    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Is there any vegatable worth growing in smaller pots? I've got tons of ~ 1 or 2 gallon pots from previous hanging baskets at my disposal.
    in the 2 gallon, maybe potatoes. Fill the container about halfway, add seed potato, cover with a couple of inches and then add to the top over time as you mound up the potato.

    Also, I think a hot pepper could be grown in that size container. Probably reduced yield, but that's not the worst result with those things. Sometimes production is a bit overwhelming IME.

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