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  1. #126
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    Sep 2001
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    I'm going to try to be down there sometime February, then for unguided late March/early April.
    I've got a lot of family stuff going on, so at this point, t's going to have to be an audible.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  2. #127
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Portland by way of Bozeman
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    4,048
    I'm making the pilgrimage to Silverton in early February as part of a trip to Telluride. I'm going to dive into their website. While I do that; what else do I need to know?

  3. #128
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    Sep 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat Sig View Post
    I'm making the pilgrimage to Silverton in early February as part of a trip to Telluride. I'm going to dive into their website. While I do that; what else do I need to know?
    Get there early, it's super nice to have a parking spot close to the lift in order to get food and water from your car.
    Bring at least a gallon of water, there is no drinking water sources at the hill, hydrate extensively. Carry snacks to fuel up on lift or while waiting. The lift base if 10,300, so it's high and altitude plays a role. Be equipped for a bc day with a good pack that can carry avie stuff, water and snacks with good ski/board carrying capabilities.

    The tent (across the bridge from the lift and up a little hill) usually opens at 8:00. Go up there and sign in first, get lift ticket (and possibly heli pass). Follow instructions on where to group up, usually near the lift base marshalling area. Ask questions, it's OK.

    Tell guides how fast you want to go and get grouped up. Usually there's fast, medium and slow groups. Normally, the slow groups are more relaxed and sometimes the uber alpha types can wreck the vibe of the "fast" groups. Be sure you know how to use your transceiver and probe.

    It's not like the usual rush at a conventional ski area, you're guided and so just be more relaxed.
    Listen to your guide. Listen to your guide. Listen to your guide.
    Once they know the group is good and paying attention, they'll take you to more exciting terrain. Bozos in the group who don't listen or are rampy will fuck this up.

    Tip at least $20, more if you can afford it.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  4. #129
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Portland by way of Bozeman
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    4,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    Get there early, it's super nice to have a parking spot close to the lift in order to get food and water from your car.
    Bring at least a gallon of water, there is no drinking water sources at the hill, hydrate extensively. Carry snacks to fuel up on lift or while waiting. The lift base if 10,300, so it's high and altitude plays a role. Be equipped for a bc day with a good pack that can carry avie stuff, water and snacks with good ski/board carrying capabilities.

    The tent (across the bridge from the lift and up a little hill) usually opens at 8:00. Go up there and sign in first, get lift ticket (and possibly heli pass). Follow instructions on where to group up, usually near the lift base marshalling area. Ask questions, it's OK.

    Tell guides how fast you want to go and get grouped up. Usually there's fast, medium and slow groups. Normally, the slow groups are more relaxed and sometimes the uber alpha types can wreck the vibe of the "fast" groups. Be sure you know how to use your transceiver and probe.

    It's not like the usual rush at a conventional ski area, you're guided and so just be more relaxed.
    Listen to your guide. Listen to your guide. Listen to your guide.
    Once they know the group is good and paying attention, they'll take you to more exciting terrain. Bozos in the group who don't listen or are rampy will fuck this up.

    Tip at least $20, more if you can afford it.
    Much appreciated on the beta.

    I'm pretty savvy with the backcountry gear, so the rest of that info is a big help. I need to get my brother - who is coming with me - savvied up on the avy gear, but he's an otherwise excellent skier.

    It looks like some seriously awesome terrain. I'm stoked!

  5. #130
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    GNARvada
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    3,971
    There has been much said, for better or worse, about their operation, but the terrain really is undisputedly fantastic. Consistently steep, challenging, minimal traversing and lots of variety. It's my favorite place to ride in CO.
    Listening, bringing your A-game, supporting your group, patience, tip well...all good advice. Other bits....don't dunk your boots in the creek, always ski/ride fall line, keep expectations in check and stay for the apres.
    You'll have a great time. Enjoy.

  6. #131
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Portland by way of Bozeman
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    4,048
    Quote Originally Posted by hatchgreenchile View Post
    There has been much said, for better or worse, about their operation, but the terrain really is undisputedly fantastic. Consistently steep, challenging, minimal traversing and lots of variety. It's my favorite place to ride in CO.
    Listening, bringing your A-game, supporting your group, patience, tip well...all good advice. Other bits....don't dunk your boots in the creek, always ski/ride fall line, keep expectations in check and stay for the apres.
    You'll have a great time. Enjoy.
    Oooh, Apres! The second best part of skiing. Tell me more about that. Is there something at the base? Or is dirtbag style out of the back of trucks? Or something in Silverton proper?

  7. #132
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Gaperville, CO
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    5,129
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat Sig View Post
    Oooh, Apres! The second best part of skiing. Tell me more about that. Is there something at the base? Or is dirtbag style out of the back of trucks? Or something in Silverton proper?
    All of the above. Beers in the main tent with the guide first -- good time to tip them and pick up any merch you need to show others you're rad. Tailgating popular when it's nice. Then down to the Avalanche brewery for pizza and beer.

  8. #133
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    Sep 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by doebedoe View Post
    All of the above. Beers in the main tent with the guide first -- good time to tip them and pick up any merch you need to show others you're rad. Tailgating popular when it's nice. Then down to the Avalanche brewery for pizza and beer.
    Tent being open depends on their covid management decisions. Last year, it wasn't open.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  9. #134
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    1,814
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat Sig View Post
    I'm making the pilgrimage to Silverton in early February as part of a trip to Telluride. I'm going to dive into their website. While I do that; what else do I need to know?
    Make sure you can get your skis strapped to your pack and be ready to hike quickly. Same goes for transition from hike to ski. Some people took forever to do this.
    Be in good physical shape. Or at least be honest about it.
    Bring a sandwich.

    Unguided season: if anyone gets a house and has an extra room I can pitch in.
    I <heart> hot tele-moms

  10. #135
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    86
    Bring an extra puffy to start the guided day. Lots of waiting around in the shade at 10k to start the day. My trusty down vest goes in the pack at the transition to the first boot pack and makes me so much more comfortable in that first hour.

  11. #136
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    SW, CO
    Posts
    923
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    Tent being open depends on their covid management decisions. Last year, it wasn't open.
    From what I've heard the apres in the tent is likely back for the season.

    Lots of good advice in here. But to reiterate, be honest with your guides about your abilities/health and being in the "fast" group isn't always the best call. Groups that listen well and are quick on transitions ski the best stuff. Tip well, drink more water than you think you need and enjoy the ride.

  12. #137
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,058
    If your game is to try and have the most fun, listen to me and Buster. If your game is to try and be the hardest motherfucker on the mountain, disregard and make sure to constantly bitch that you could run the place better.

    You, will be playing by their rules. It is a test. The below assuming you are not a proven entity from the guides perspective. First is to say, in the AM "hurry up and wait" is the right strategy. This is to avoid the tent cluster fuck, get checked in and get back on your own time.

    During this "wait period", the groups start forming organically. Start sizing people up, looking around chatting etc., these will be the people you will be spending your day with. Your guide will be making terrain choices based your performance. So just try to eye up folks who look like they are on the same wavelength. People that are renting equipment, I'll stay away from them. People that spray, act like a fuckin' highball and have that excessive 'faux rad thing, I avoid that also.

    Second is the pace of the day. There are always a bunch of groups really frothing by the time they get off this lift the first time (this can be as late as 10am). Often, the fast hiking guides will take them on a bit of a walk to nowhere just on principal. For every group that can hike hard all day, there are 10 groups that blow there wad and are done by lunch.

    Unless you spend your winter BC skiing on the regular above 11K, you should be in a slow or medium group. Even is you are reasonably fit and qualified, you make enjoy a medium group. This is me. My goal is to ski until the lift closes. On any giving day, I'd estimate 10% of the skiers do this. Don't get frustrated with the guided terrain choices or your groups performance. Even you keep a good attitude, your day will keep getting better. Groups spread out, tired skiers drop out and more terrain is "open". Remember your guides choses what you ski from a list of options. This options change based on your performance as a group.

    So if your first run will be pretty basic terrain with pretty basic instructions like, "one and a time, stack your tracks, ski to me". If you've got one rouge Chachi that want to freelance, that is gonna effect your whole day going forward. If you, as a group, can efficiently and safely move through the terrain this will unlock this rest of the day.

  13. #138
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    16,363
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If your game is to try and have the most fun, listen to me and Buster. If your game is to try and be the hardest motherfucker on the mountain, disregard and make sure to constantly bitch that you could run the place better.

    You, will be playing by their rules. It is a test. The below assuming you are not a proven entity from the guides perspective. First is to say, in the AM "hurry up and wait" is the right strategy. This is to avoid the tent cluster fuck, get checked in and get back on your own time.

    During this "wait period", the groups start forming organically. Start sizing people up, looking around chatting etc., these will be the people you will be spending your day with. Your guide will be making terrain choices based your performance. So just try to eye up folks who look like they are on the same wavelength. People that are renting equipment, I'll stay away from them. People that spray, act like a fuckin' highball and have that excessive 'faux rad thing, I avoid that also.

    Second is the pace of the day. There are always a bunch of groups really frothing by the time they get off this lift the first time (this can be as late as 10am). Often, the fast hiking guides will take them on a bit of a walk to nowhere just on principal. For every group that can hike hard all day, there are 10 groups that blow there wad and are done by lunch.

    Unless you spend your winter BC skiing on the regular above 11K, you should be in a slow or medium group. Even is you are reasonably fit and qualified, you make enjoy a medium group. This is me. My goal is to ski until the lift closes. On any giving day, I'd estimate 10% of the skiers do this. Don't get frustrated with the guided terrain choices or your groups performance. Even you keep a good attitude, your day will keep getting better. Groups spread out, tired skiers drop out and more terrain is "open". Remember your guides choses what you ski from a list of options. This options change based on your performance as a group.

    So if your first run will be pretty basic terrain with pretty basic instructions like, "one and a time, stack your tracks, ski to me". If you've got one rouge Chachi that want to freelance, that is gonna effect your whole day going forward. If you, as a group, can efficiently and safely move through the terrain this will unlock this rest of the day.
    This should be printed in the tent.
    Is it radix panax notoginseng? - splat

  14. #139
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Gaperville, CO
    Posts
    5,129
    Quote Originally Posted by MakersTeleMark View Post
    This should be printed in the tent.
    I second this motion.

  15. #140
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Dreamland
    Posts
    1,026

    Altitude tends to be the major factor

    Quote Originally Posted by doebedoe View Post
    I second this motion.
    Regardless of how fit you think you are and how you ski, hiking from 11,000 up to possibly over 13,000 feet separates the skiers pretty quickly. If you are not used to hiking up high in ski boots and a pack on your back things can start to slow down fast. SM is a visual mind fuck of spectacular skiing terrain but if you bite off more than you can chew it can be a rough day. Like the parable goes, often times slow and steady wins the race.
    Last edited by Mudfoot; 11-07-2021 at 04:59 PM.
    Gravity Junkie

  16. #141
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,814
    The rogue Chachi! Love it. We had one of those. All he talked about was how this was nothing compared to XYZ places that he had skied. Euro.

    Tip your guide. Cash or ask for his/her Venmo.

    Don't fall in the peehole.
    I <heart> hot tele-moms

  17. #142
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    GNARvada
    Posts
    3,971
    How have we not mentioned the chopper yet?

    Bobcat - a bluebird day with good snow, get in the bird. It does not suck. 1-2 drops takes you across the valley, 3+ drops get you out of Velocity Basin to some nearby zones. If storming, stick with the lift.

    Some other advice on terrain...Silverton is never 100% open. Some runs require the snowpack stars to align and rarely open. Even then, they require a group firing on all cylinders to score (ex. Mandatory T->B, Billboard #s). The terrain is rotated daily, so some runs just aren't on the menu.

  18. #143
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    10,686
    Quote Originally Posted by hatchgreenchile View Post
    Some other advice on terrain...Silverton never is 100% open. Some runs require the snowpack stars to align and rarely open. Even then, they require a group firing on all cylinders to score (ex. Mandatory T->B, Billboard #s). The terrain is rotated daily, so some runs just aren't an on the menu..
    To expand on that, the sun can be a very big factor in determining when things are open/closed not to mention when they are in good condition for skiing. Of course, most of my experience has been unguided, early and late season when the sun is stronger than Jan/Feb.

  19. #144
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    7,369
    Everything Foggy said.

    I'll also add, a longer hike does not necessarily equal better terrain/better skiing at Silverton. Some of my favorite runs are right off the lift. Some of the big hikes lead to relatively mediocre runs. (Of course there are also mediocre runs off the lift and great runs farther out). There's no need to be in the fast group/beg to hike a lot unless you just like hiking more than you like skiing.

  20. #145
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,814
    THIS. Last year for my buddy's birthday we had a 6 run heli day, and 3 regular guided days. We had planned the heli day for day 2, but day 1 was bluebird, and then stormy conditions were planned. They offered to move it up a day and it was the best move.
    The heli day is stupid expensive (including tip) but ZERO hiking. We had a great group and skied awesome terrain. That day cost more than the rest of my season combined.

    Quote Originally Posted by hatchgreenchile View Post
    How have we not mentioned the chopper yet?

    Bobcat - a bluebird day with good snow, get in the bird. It does not suck. 1-2 drops takes you across the valley, 3+ drops get you out of Velocity Basin to some nearby zones. If storming, stick with the lift.
    I <heart> hot tele-moms

  21. #146
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
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    From Silverton Mountain:


    Ski Three Consecutive Days & Get Sunday Guided Free!
    Buy 3 consecutive days of guided skiing & get Sunday for Free!
    Special deal must be purchased prior to Thanksgiving when the promo will end.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  22. #147
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
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    FYI:

    FINAL DAY for $59 HELI, with earlybird deal!! Only way to grab a $59 heli is with unguided season pass and price increases from $229 to $599 Dec 1.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  23. #148
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SLCizzy
    Posts
    3,028
    Anybody gonna be up there for Guided opening weekend? Toying with the idea of a day on 12/30 or 12/31.

  24. #149
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Aspen
    Posts
    1,878
    Bump.

    A birdy told me that Shocklee has departed the Silverton crew and the general vibe there is slipping hard.

    What say those in the know?

  25. #150
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,058
    Shocklee has not been guiding there for a while. The last time I was there, the vibe was great. I think the place is great but its not for everyone. Maybe that has changed? They have been open for what 2 weeks so far this year?

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