Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 172
  1. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NCW
    Posts
    3,541
    From the Wasatch thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by tBatt View Post
    Photos from the Gear Room's insta sent to UAC immediately before the accident.
    One article I read said it involved a party of 3 and a party of 5. Gear Room's first pic shows 4+photographer.

    Attachment 361664
    Attachment 361665
    Devastating, but this just screams hubris to me. To make such observations and then go ahead and ski avy terrain, way outside my acceptable risk. RIP
    Quote Originally Posted by mfcf13 View Post
    The world needs more Donnely and less Stainless.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    An Anheuser-Busch Barley Field
    Posts
    5,312
    Holy shit, this is literally nightmare-ish

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    YetiMan
    Posts
    12,864
    I’m so sorry you guys.

    Just a thought:
    If being safe means skiing moguls, giggle and think of this post and hot dog noodle some bumps just for me.
    If being safe means liftlines, remember ol’ yetiman: tell jokes, talk trash, tell stories....make it fun!

    Let’s all still be alive when the snowpack heals.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by abraham View Post
    I hadn't heard about the incident near Moab that was mentioned in the article. Snowy torrents link for that accident here for anyone who might be curious. https://www.snowytorrents.com/1990s/1992-2/92-5/
    A last observation to mention about this accident is that of a simple action that can have a profound impact on consequences has to do with ski pole straps. Yates, Loveridge, Hopkins, Turk all had ski pole straps around their wrists. All died. Biegler’s and Meleski’s straps were off, and they survived. Wrist straps on ski poles (and ice axes for climbers) turn poles into anchors. Hands that are anchored cannot be used to create an airspace or claw away snow to self-rescue.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    14,479
    first thing I do with a new set of poles is remove the straps. lots of folks just use them on the ups but it seems quite possible in yesterday's accident that one of the parties was on the up. plus they look stupid flapping around on the down if they're still attached.
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    10,111
    Quote Originally Posted by powdork View Post
    first thing I do with a new set of poles is remove the straps. lots of folks just use them on the ups but it seems quite possible in yesterday's accident that one of the parties was on the up. plus they look stupid flapping around on the down if they're still attached.
    Ditto on the straps.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  7. #32
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mt. Baker
    Posts
    1,528
    Quote Originally Posted by powdork View Post
    first thing I do with a new set of poles is remove the straps. lots of folks just use them on the ups but it seems quite possible in yesterday's accident that one of the parties was on the up. plus they look stupid flapping around on the down if they're still attached.
    Lots of the newer poles feature breakaway straps now. Or at least all the new Scott’s do.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    11,345
    I think that if you are relying on pole straps for the difference between life and death then you are really reaching. I agree that the straps keep you from swimming up hill, and act as an anchor as you are being buried, but you should never find yourself in that situation. Sorry. The most important thing is making decisions that place you far from harm's way. Don't travel up hill in a place where it is likely (or even possible) to slide above you. Stay near the tree line. If your ascent is out in the open and below a 35 degree N facing slope, go someplace else. Think of the potential consequences that your route presents before embarking. Don't ski on N, NE, NW facing 30 degree+ aspects when the avalanche center tells you to avoid these ares. This is what I mean by risk tolerance. I am espousing my own personal thoughts and people have different tolerances of risk. I would imagine that if 100 people die in slides in the intermountain west, people will still tour in hazardous conditions. It's human nature. Given the conditions, people are making hasty decisions to ride fresh pow. Many seasoned bc skiers are saying to dial it back. I say fuck the bc right now. I'm glad that I am happy staying inbounds and finding stashes in the trees. The Bird, Alta, PowMow, DV and even PC have been skiing great for the past week. Most of the tragedies are happening on weekend days. I will skin on mellow 25-28 degree slopes and for so many reasons, 99% of my skiing will be done M-F.
    “A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.”
    ― Milton Friedman

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    14,479
    It's weird you have a low tolerance for risk but scoff at something that obviously helps to reduce risk. By your line of thinking there's no reason to even beep.
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Where the sheets have no stains
    Posts
    16,913
    RE: Straps.

    I have 1 set of poles. I removed the straps for patrol work, I tour with those poles as well. Its just good practice to remove the straps or have good break-ways if you must have the straps. You are not wrong though, that should not be a margin between living and dying.

    Sorry for all the bad shit down there.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    The Shed of Incorruptible Veracity
    Posts
    8,172
    Having tried both ways at home, I can also say that it is clumsier to pull the trigger on an airbag while you have a pole strapped to your wrist. Anyway, pole straps in the backcountry is another discussion for a different thread.
    The truth doesn't care about your feelings.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Posts
    13,668

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    26,523
    How awful. RIP to those lost. Everyone else, please stay safe.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    3,511
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    I think that if you are relying on pole straps for the difference between life and death then you are really reaching. I agree that the straps keep you from swimming up hill, and act as an anchor as you are being buried, but you should never find yourself in that situation. Sorry. The most important thing is making decisions that place you far from harm's way. Don't travel up hill in a place where it is likely (or even possible) to slide above you. Stay near the tree line. If your ascent is out in the open and below a 35 degree N facing slope, go someplace else. Think of the potential consequences that your route presents before embarking. Don't ski on N, NE, NW facing 30 degree+ aspects when the avalanche center tells you to avoid these ares. This is what I mean by risk tolerance. I am espousing my own personal thoughts and people have different tolerances of risk. I would imagine that if 100 people die in slides in the intermountain west, people will still tour in hazardous conditions. It's human nature. Given the conditions, people are making hasty decisions to ride fresh pow. Many seasoned bc skiers are saying to dial it back. I say fuck the bc right now. I'm glad that I am happy staying inbounds and finding stashes in the trees. The Bird, Alta, PowMow, DV and even PC have been skiing great for the past week. Most of the tragedies are happening on weekend days. I will skin on mellow 25-28 degree slopes and for so many reasons, 99% of my skiing will be done M-F.
    Right

    Sent from my Redmi Note 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Funland
    Posts
    1,474
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    I think that if you are relying on pole straps for the difference between life and death then you are really reaching.
    Not that it would have likely changed the outcome, but the Squaretop fatality report mentioned that the victim was wearing a polestrap and that was the deepest buried part of his body. When his partner was trying to recover him, he exposed his face but was not able to pull the body out of the snow/begin CPR for a few minutes because he had to continue digging to get to the arm/pole strap removed.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    the Can-Utardia / LMCC VT
    Posts
    11,472
    I'd harp on my friends all the time about their straps in avy terrain, And tree skiing to a lesser extent, and they would roll their eyes about it, but its deadly serious.

    Sent from my SM-N986U using TGR Forums mobile app
    Quote Originally Posted by Hohes View Post
    I couldn't give a fuck, but today I am procrastinating so TGR is my filler.
    Quote Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
    faceshots are a powerful currency
    get paid

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Funland
    Posts
    1,474
    Names released.
    https://www.abc4.com/news/local-news...rush-to-scene/

    All in their 20s. Absolutely heartbreaking.

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    Lots of the newer poles feature breakaway straps now. Or at least all the new Scott’s do.
    Kerma has had breakaway straps for probably 50 years. Nobody else did so figured it was patented. Good to hear about Scott poles.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    10,111
    Quote Originally Posted by My Pet Powder Goat View Post
    I'd harp on my friends all the time about their straps in avy terrain, And tree skiing to a lesser extent, and they would roll their eyes about it, but its deadly serious.

    Sent from my SM-N986U using TGR Forums mobile app
    Yurt owner in the Wallowa in OR wouldn’t let you start a trip with straps on your poles


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    Posts
    3,487

    Millcreek Canyon UT - 4 fatalities

    I haven't talked to him or seen him post in a while, but it looks like straightlineorbust was one of the fatalities. Didn't know him well at all but we skied together at the Bird a few times. RIP.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3706.JPG 
Views:	494 
Size:	740.0 KB 
ID:	361727

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    8
    Condolences to everyone affected by this

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Cruzing
    Posts
    11,206
    Yeah. Condolences. Shitty news.

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
    Posts
    4,627
    That is just heartbreaking. Young men and women in the prime of life, out enjoying a day in the mountains. RIP

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    434
    Someone asked me after the first slide in the glade if I had ever seen it slide before. My response was "yes, many times and I doubt it's over, there".

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	wilson-panorama.jpg 
Views:	1761 
Size:	97.9 KB 
ID:	361750

    Not a prophet. Plenty left in the chutes, Alexander Basin pass, only pockets in Toot Suite and to boot. Soldier hasn't slid, the snow pack is hollow.
    What a tragedy, so young.
    BTW, the skin track is placed to the looker's right of the last piece of crown(learned after more than one close encounter).

  25. #50
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    west tetons
    Posts
    1,678
    Quote Originally Posted by wra View Post
    Someone asked me after the first slide in the glade if I had ever seen it slide before. My response was "yes, many times and I doubt it's over, there".

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	wilson-panorama.jpg 
Views:	1761 
Size:	97.9 KB 
ID:	361750

    Not a prophet. Plenty left in the chutes, Alexander Basin pass, only pockets in Toot Suite and to boot. Soldier hasn't slid, the snow pack is hollow.
    What a tragedy, so young.
    BTW, the skin track is placed to the looker's right of the last piece of crown(learned after more than one close encounter).
    Thanks @wra. Nice to hear from you. You of anyone should know about Alexander Basin. I have been devastated since I heard about this last night. It violates my mission statement of helping people not die in avalanches. So sorry, Wasatch folks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •