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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Paradise
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    3,939

    Aches, Pains and being 45 years old.

    Disclaimer: I may have posted something similar before but I can't say for sure. This has been an ongoing theme for me over the last 7 years so I apologize if I sound like a broken record to anyone with a much better memory than mine.

    Last year I had a crash going really fast in very firm moguls. I cracked/bruised my ribs and did some funky ligament tearing where the ribs connect to my spine (or that's what I think anyways). It put me out for a while and when I got back to work I quickly re-injured it and that set me back a few more weeks. Then I gots the Covid that January. Anyways, half my ski season was shot and then I had a hard time getting my confidence back.

    The season before last year was a banner one for me with no injuries and epic conditions. I hadn't skied that strong in many years.

    Now this year, we haven't had any snow yet so I'm cruising groomers and riding in Sedona. I have been mountain biking pretty strongly this year as my job puts me into constantly riding and checking out others projects. It's been an awesome year and for the first time in my life I like going to work. Two weeks ago though I had an extremely violent crash in Sedona on the Ground control trail. I was going really fast and got rodeo clowned for 40 feet after my foot came off my right pedal while doubling up a roller section before getting completely crumpled. It fucked me up real good. Getting up after sitting hurts like hell and I've got a 14 inch long purple and yellow old man bruise that runs down my right inner thigh from a lemon sized lump on my hip. It was a full inventory sort of crash, you know, like where you do a full scan for broken bones or dislocations.

    This shit has me rethinking my whole program. My body aches like a mf-er these days. I have a constant warm, slightly burning sensation in my knees, wrists, hands, fingers that I have routinely dislocated and my shoulders. I don't like pain anymore.

    the thing is is I'm 45 years old but have lived the life of a truly dedicated ski and bike bum. It's what I know and how I live. So how do you make the transition to reeling it back a little and putting in the effort to stay injury free?

    Does anyone relate on here and how has or is the transition from being a young charger into becoming middle aged gone or been going for you?
    dirtbag, not a dentist

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    The Goods Department
    Posts
    871
    What's your stretch routine? Stretch + rolling out daily has helped me stay limber.
    Skiing in the rockies is like 70's porn

    Lots of bush

    Some wood

    No faceshots...

    -Mtnlion

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Paradise
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    3,939
    Quote Originally Posted by Asspen View Post
    What's your stretch routine? Stretch + rolling out daily has helped me stay limber.
    Stretching? What's that?

    I guess we have found a problem
    dirtbag, not a dentist

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Inside the Circle
    Posts
    2,345
    CBD oil 2X per day and tumeric supplements.

    Changed my life.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    1,435
    yoga, daily. I'm the broken record now, but yeah it works.

    Also, some buds have tried to convince me to get into mountain biking, and i'm like fuuuuuck that. Seems like a good way to get hurt really bad.
    I'll stick to using my bike for transpo. Skateboarding isn't much smarter, but I just feel like i can bail a lot easier than getting all tangled up in a bike.

    Good luck!
    24į 06į

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    10,717
    Wait a few years. You will long for the pain of being 45
    ďA society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.Ē
    ― Milton Friedman

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,266
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    Wait a few years. You will long for the pain of being 45
    Pfffffftt 45!!!

    Yeah, yoga. Iím convinced that Iíd be a cripple without yoga.

    But dial it back. Which do you want more:

    -to launch big air on the bike today or be biking in 20 years

    -skiing the moguls or skiing in 20 years

    You are in the long game, but thought you were in a short game


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    Keystone is fucking lame. But, deadly.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    6,703
    Get with a good program and stick to it. All the idiots I know my age who ski all twisted up don't have a good system in place or aren't committed to the routine.

    I start every day like this. Never let up!

    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    208 State
    Posts
    2,280
    Weed helps along with stretching and eating healthy and mixing up activities and not overdoing it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Joisey
    Posts
    2,130
    Oh to be 45 again

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    6,703
    Isn't your wife a doctor? Does that make it harder to practice denialism?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Not Brooklyn
    Posts
    7,199
    I can relate to this, but my story is a bit different. My last year coaching wrestling was 5 years ago at age 39. I was pretty good at it. I coached (and taught) at a small high school where all the students were recent immigrants. I never had a kid with prior wrestling experience. I never had a full time assistant coach. We didn't even have a facility for home matches. But in 9 years I coached more State place winners than any other coach in NYC history (NYC wrestling typically sucks compared to Long Island and parts of Upstate). I coached the first State finalist from NYC in over 20 years. I had Greco and Freestyle State Champions and one All-American, and a bunch of kids who went on to wrestle in college. It was great fun, even if it took over my life- we trained all year, I taught kids how to lift weights, ran hill sprints with them in the park in the summer, drove them all over for the State tournaments, often paying out of my own pocket to make sure they faced the best possible competition. Frankly, it was all pretty awesome. The program was completely unconventional and pretty damn successful. I'm proud of it all.

    The toll on my health, however, was significant. By my last year I was in constant pain. My spine was a mess. My fingers were gnarled. My toes were arthritic. And my shoulders were fucked. In order for my best wrestlers to get better they had to wrestle me on close to a daily basis and my body just couldn't handle it during the last years. But I kept it up because it had been working and their was no real alternative. I'd get injured but never took more than a day or two off. While I was wrestling I didn't feel pain much. Riding the subway home I was in agony.

    When I finally stopped, and moved to CO, I wasn't sure to what degree I'd be able to put my body back together. Frankly, it's gone pretty damn well. I need to take good care of by back (the PT will never end), but I mostly feel good these days. I run/ski/lift weights 5-6 days a week, and only deal with nagging injuries. But the way I approach all those things is different. I ski carefully. This is my fifth year in CO and I recently had a ski release for the second time in that span. I still ski fast, even jump off stuff now and then but I stay under my limit and the landings are soft. Lifting weights is about taking care of my body more than getting stronger. Even my running is conservative. I've run a couple 50k's (not competitively), but mostly I keep the mileage/stress moderate. I've just learned that the because my age, and because of the abuse I've put my body through, if I overdo it I will crumble. One little problem will lead to another, and another and another. And it takes a long time to put the pieces back together.

    Having kids also pushed me toward this way of doing things. If I feel like shit, I still need to get up early and feed them and change diapers and everything else. Hangovers and injuries aren't worth it any more. And if I can't exercise my mental health suffers. So I'm just not rad anymore. I wouldn't say I made some bold choice. I had to change and make the best of what was left of me. But I still do long days in the mountains now and then, and ski something steep when I'm damn sure it's safe. Consistency and caution make it possible.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    24,952
    I definitely have dialed my mt biking back, crashes hurt too much. I still ride the same trails, and still ride fast, but I no longer try to ride as fast as I can, or try to clean something just because I want to be able to say I cleaned it. Would rather walk something, or ride a little slower, and be able to ride tomorrow.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Planning an exit
    Posts
    5,415
    Strength training. Push, pull, hinge, squat and loaded carry. Keep the reps low (3x3, 2x5, 5x2). Shouldnít take that long to do it twice a week. Lift heavy and be in and out quickly. Stretch (loaded to help mobility) on the off days.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    22,634
    if you can remember 45 you weren't there

    regular yoga practise is a really good idea even if you only do a beginner once a week, skiing 75+ days a season the Yoga kept me from being injured and it wasnt about the hollywood moves its just about the relaxing of body parts, in fact my Yogini told me when people do the tougher moves they don't fully relax the muscles which is what Yoga was about in the 1st place

    Unfortunately Yoga did nothing for a blown ACL
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    13,798
    If you can push through this to 55, then they start replacing parts and yer good ass new
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,109
    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    I can relate to this, but my story is a bit different. My last year coaching wrestling was 5 years ago at age 39. I was pretty good at it. I coached (and taught) at a small high school where all the students were recent immigrants. I never had a kid with prior wrestling experience. I never had a full time assistant coach. We didn't even have a facility for home matches. But in 9 years I coached more State place winners than any other coach in NYC history (NYC wrestling typically sucks compared to Long Island and parts of Upstate). I coached the first State finalist from NYC in over 20 years. I had Greco and Freestyle State Champions and one All-American, and a bunch of kids who went on to wrestle in college. It was great fun, even if it took over my life- we trained all year, I taught kids how to lift weights, ran hill sprints with them in the park in the summer, drove them all over for the State tournaments, often paying out of my own pocket to make sure they faced the best possible competition. Frankly, it was all pretty awesome. The program was completely unconventional and pretty damn successful. I'm proud of it all.

    The toll on my health, however, was significant. By my last year I was in constant pain. My spine was a mess. My fingers were gnarled. My toes were arthritic. And my shoulders were fucked. In order for my best wrestlers to get better they had to wrestle me on close to a daily basis and my body just couldn't handle it during the last years. But I kept it up because it had been working and their was no real alternative. I'd get injured but never took more than a day or two off. While I was wrestling I didn't feel pain much. Riding the subway home I was in agony.

    When I finally stopped, and moved to CO, I wasn't sure to what degree I'd be able to put my body back together. Frankly, it's gone pretty damn well. I need to take good care of by back (the PT will never end), but I mostly feel good these days. I run/ski/lift weights 5-6 days a week, and only deal with nagging injuries. But the way I approach all those things is different. I ski carefully. This is my fifth year in CO and I recently had a ski release for the second time in that span. I still ski fast, even jump off stuff now and then but I stay under my limit and the landings are soft. Lifting weights is about taking care of my body more than getting stronger. Even my running is conservative. I've run a couple 50k's (not competitively), but mostly I keep the mileage/stress moderate. I've just learned that the because my age, and because of the abuse I've put my body through, if I overdo it I will crumble. One little problem will lead to another, and another and another. And it takes a long time to put the pieces back together.

    Having kids also pushed me toward this way of doing things. If I feel like shit, I still need to get up early and feed them and change diapers and everything else. Hangovers and injuries aren't worth it any more. And if I can't exercise my mental health suffers. So I'm just not rad anymore. I wouldn't say I made some bold choice. I had to change and make the best of what was left of me. But I still do long days in the mountains now and then, and ski something steep when I'm damn sure it's safe. Consistency and caution make it possible.
    This is an excellent post on several levels -

    keep on, keeping on diamonds ! ! skiJ
    " ... I will do anything to go Skiing ... There Is no pride ... " (Miriam , 2005-2006 epic)

    Dec21, 2016. LittleBigLost :
    " I think about it everyday. It is my reminder to live life to the fullest. I get up early, go to bed late, 'cuz I got shit to do. Like I said, I'm 61. Not going to wait till I'm 81 to do stuff, ...

    Get out there and do stuff!

    Enjoy life to the fullest!!

    See you on the slopes! "

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    66
    OP needs to stop going so fast. Itís ok to fall if you arenít going fast.

    Iíll catch shit for this, but I telemark. Cause I can have a ton of fun, work really hard and i canít go fast. MTB is a Karate Monkey with a rigid fork. It is the funnest bike Iíve ever riden. But it is soooo slow. My body feels so much better since installing governor switches.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Šguila
    Posts
    1,050
    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    I can relate to this, but my story is a bit different. My last year coaching wrestling was 5 years ago at age 39. I was pretty good at it. I coached (and taught) at a small high school where all the students were recent immigrants. I never had a kid with prior wrestling experience. I never had a full time assistant coach. We didn't even have a facility for home matches. But in 9 years I coached more State place winners than any other coach in NYC history (NYC wrestling typically sucks compared to Long Island and parts of Upstate). I coached the first State finalist from NYC in over 20 years. I had Greco and Freestyle State Champions and one All-American, and a bunch of kids who went on to wrestle in college. It was great fun, even if it took over my life- we trained all year, I taught kids how to lift weights, ran hill sprints with them in the park in the summer, drove them all over for the State tournaments, often paying out of my own pocket to make sure they faced the best possible competition. Frankly, it was all pretty awesome. The program was completely unconventional and pretty damn successful. I'm proud of it all.

    The toll on my health, however, was significant. By my last year I was in constant pain. My spine was a mess. My fingers were gnarled. My toes were arthritic. And my shoulders were fucked. In order for my best wrestlers to get better they had to wrestle me on close to a daily basis and my body just couldn't handle it during the last years. But I kept it up because it had been working and their was no real alternative. I'd get injured but never took more than a day or two off. While I was wrestling I didn't feel pain much. Riding the subway home I was in agony.

    When I finally stopped, and moved to CO, I wasn't sure to what degree I'd be able to put my body back together. Frankly, it's gone pretty damn well. I need to take good care of by back (the PT will never end), but I mostly feel good these days. I run/ski/lift weights 5-6 days a week, and only deal with nagging injuries. But the way I approach all those things is different. I ski carefully. This is my fifth year in CO and I recently had a ski release for the second time in that span. I still ski fast, even jump off stuff now and then but I stay under my limit and the landings are soft. Lifting weights is about taking care of my body more than getting stronger. Even my running is conservative. I've run a couple 50k's (not competitively), but mostly I keep the mileage/stress moderate. I've just learned that the because my age, and because of the abuse I've put my body through, if I overdo it I will crumble. One little problem will lead to another, and another and another. And it takes a long time to put the pieces back together.

    Having kids also pushed me toward this way of doing things. If I feel like shit, I still need to get up early and feed them and change diapers and everything else. Hangovers and injuries aren't worth it any more. And if I can't exercise my mental health suffers. So I'm just not rad anymore. I wouldn't say I made some bold choice. I had to change and make the best of what was left of me. But I still do long days in the mountains now and then, and ski something steep when I'm damn sure it's safe. Consistency and caution make it possible.
    This is interesting. My brother is 2 years older than I, so he's 38. We both wrestled in high school, he had a little more success than I and went on to dabble in D3 for a few years. He's been a HS head coach in Iowa now for at least 10 years. He's pretty fit and would for sure whoop my ass, but I worry about the long-term physical demands. He looked skinny strong last time I saw him, probably about 180 (maybe 20 pounds more than I). His best kids are 215 and heavyweight, so he's gotta take a beating.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Alpental
    Posts
    6,000
    Quote Originally Posted by timackie View Post
    OP needs to stop going so fast. Itís ok to fall if you arenít going fast.
    Power of positive thinking: It's OK to go fast if you aren't going to fall.

    Dial it back until you stop falling, then figure it out. You're not going to fall, are you?
    Move upside and let the man go through...

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    13,404
    Me: 38, can still ski like I did at 28, though I get a lot fewer days/runs in due to the normal middle-aged family- and career-related reasons. I've had to dial it back on the bike due a bad crash and head injury in October 2019. Taking about 10% off on the bike will reduce your crash frequency considerably, and don't get your wheels too far off the ground. I'm probably done doing big air on the bike, sadly, too much cranial risk now.

    Sleep is the foundation upon which all other healthy habits are built upon, so get that dialed in. Then, stay strong and fit, stay limber, minimize stress, and eat as healthy as you possibly can (see the nutrition science thread for my thoughts on this subject and to discuss further: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...Science-thread).

    Check out Kelly Starrett's Youtube channel for how to fix broken shit: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnn...ZHhQ4uLTAX8eYA

    On the importance of sleep, read this: https://www.amazon.com/Why-We-Sleep-.../dp/1501144316
    On stress, read this: https://www.amazon.com/Why-Zebras-Do.../dp/0805073698
    On general longevity, read this: https://www.amazon.com/Lifespan-Why-.../dp/1501191977

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Ten Mile Vistas
    Posts
    3,797
    Dial it back on the bike. Still give 'er hell on skis. That's my formula @ 48. I'm not a great biker, so that makes it easy.

    Oh yeah, and stretch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Me: 38, can still ski like I did at 28
    Looking back, I feel like peak ski shape for me was around 37-38. Sorry for the bad news.
    Old's Cool.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,109
    There are some interesting examples of the demands of coaching at high levels -

    Dan Gable was an active participant in Hawkeye practices for decades
    ( I don't know how many hip replacements he had but it is at least three and the certainty of additional Surgery contributed to his retirement ) ;
    And
    videos of Tim Krumrie working with professional football players into Krumrie's fifties was amazing...

    my offering for this thread is an idea that adjusting expectations IS a necessary part of the aging process... And
    If you can avoid the life altering injuries, Some of that can be delayed -

    Good luck ! skiJ

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Cackalacky
    Posts
    1,757
    you guys are scaring the fuck out of me. getting old sounds terrible.
    In the room the women come and go
    Talking of Michelangelo

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Donner Summit
    Posts
    884
    When you're young you can take a bad crash and bounce back in a couple of days. When you're old it might take 6 months (or 2 years). So while you may be able to send as hard as you could in your 20s, the consequences of a mistake go up substantially. Your body is telling you to dial it back - listen to it. At least if you want to keep skiing and riding into your 50s (and 60s).

    I'll also suggest core work - Pilates or exercises on your own (planks, bridges, etc.).

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