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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    50 miles E of Paradise
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    10,807
    Quote Originally Posted by new yabyum View Post
    Still getting it done on the original equipment @ 67, although braced. Still on 3 pins but don't Telly much, can still bend the knee, it's getting back up that's where the fun begins.
    Same chronological age, still about 16 emotionally
    Gave up tele seven years ago when my brain would say “initiate turn” and my quads would increasingly say “fuck you”

    Still ski 3-5 days a week inbounds depending on weather. Same with MTB as snow melts out in April-May until snowed out again.

    But with two plates, one rod, 15 screws, a bolt and some Kevlar mesh holding me together from six ortho repairs, plus a meniscus and AC problem, I’ve dialed it back quite a bit. Rehab is a cruel bitch I’d rather not hang out with again.

    Don’t need to puke, experience hypoxia or bleed to have an epic ride anymore. I try to avoid air >3” or >1sec, Type 2 fun and crashing.

    As far as being sore and aching all the time, yup. It’s your reward for living. Just keep moving, stretch, get after it in moderation and enjoy watching the youngsters huck till they’re hospitalized
    Check Out Ullr's Mobile Avalanche Safety Tools for iOS and Android
    www.ullrlabs.com

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6,121
    Quote Originally Posted by thefortrees View Post
    I think dantheman mentioned kelly starett somewhere in this thread too... The book “becoming a supple leopard” will only do good things for you. Buy some of the rehab devices like foam roller, lacrosse ball, voodoo band, etc. If you have trouble motivating yourself or planning out 10-20 mins of mobility work a day, flip to the back of the book and they’ve got multi-week programs targeted at pain or mobility issues specific to certain areas of the body. Also, lift more weights.

    https://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Supp.../dp/1628600837
    My physiatrist recommended “ready to run” if I was choosing between the two books.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    199
    I've noticed that when I crash skiing the surface is kind of slippery and I slide pretty well. It doesn't really hurt, usually. I can ski at 90% and not worry too much.

    Bike crashes almost always result in a sudden, abrupt, painful stop. Sometimes I have to pluck parts of the earth out of new holes in my skin. Sometimes the heavy bike strikes me and inflicts further trauma. It really sucks. I ride much more conservatively than I ski.
    "Holy Cow!" someone exclaimed from the back of the stationwagon.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    3,119

    Aches, Pains and being 45 years old.

    Train strength. I prefer weights. This is hugely impactful

    Stretch

    Stay thin. Less weight to carry is a big deal.

    More sleep

    Reduce stress

    Don’t crash huge.

    Figure out how to enjoy being out there without being right on your limit all the time.

    Find challenges that don’t result in large impacts if you fuck them up.

    Weights. Again. Do this. With age some of your muscles will start to atrophy, then your body figures out a way to live that doesn’t use them, then they atrophy even worse. That leaves you really vulnerable. Weights fix this if you have a good program.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,743
    I'm 47. I want to be doing this shit for as long as possible and I think about that all the time. Mentally, two things have helped me. Despite the desire and dedication, I'm OK with not being as good at skiing as I used to be...I'm still the best skier on the mountain however. Second is that you just have to work harder at it how.

    I'm gonna read back though some of ya'll's specific suggestions but I'll say start with trying to be generally pretty healthy. For me the biggest change when I hit about 40 was that I had to start working out. I was 165 and strong for my whole life then I woke up one day and I was 175 and not that strong. So stay hydrated, moderate alcholol, don't easy like an asshole, no soda, elevated heart rate 3-5 times per week etc.

    The last think is to find new challenges that you don't age out of. I have friends that are struggling mentally because they can't just skiing there faces off anymore. Flyfishing, dirtbiking, paragliding, sailing etc. It's a game you need to play with yourself to stay fresh and happy. I'm super surprised that I'm doing OK with this. Skiing has been therapy for me since a young age. Hate fucking some snow has kept me out of some dark places. I don't need to go skiing anymore in the same way and it has been super healthy for me.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Salida, CO
    Posts
    1,417
    ya get what ya get and ya don't pitch a fit

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Driggs
    Posts
    444
    There is a gentleman at Alta Utah who still gets after it at 100 yo, ( No, not Tele free) He is the first to say there're things you just can't do as well, After a certain point you get into the long haul groove. I thought 70 was a reasonable target, now' it's 75-80. The Targheegeezers and the >80 lunch bunch at Alta's Alf's cafe are great inspiration.
    Last edited by new yabyum; 01-16-2021 at 07:50 AM.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
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    13,920
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    Hate fucking some snow has kept me out of some dark places.
    Love that quote.
    For me, I took up climbing. I suck at it, which means I can continue to improve, or at least think I can improve, for quite some time.
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Planning an exit
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    5,488
    Quote Originally Posted by powdork View Post
    Love that quote.
    For me, I took up climbing. I suck at it, which means I can continue to improve, or at least think I can improve, for quite some time.
    There's also a group of old guys at Font that are like 70/80 and go out there and do their circuits all the time.


  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Alpental
    Posts
    6,031
    At 45, if you are still inclined to say "hold my beer..." then it's time to put the beer down.

    I was doing great with this aging thing but 2020 was a straight kick in the nuts.
    Move upside and let the man go through...

  11. #61
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    Apr 2007
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    Tahoe
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    13,920
    Quote Originally Posted by concretejungle View Post
    There's also a group of old guys at Font that are like 70/80 and go out there and do their circuits all the time.

    That was cool except for being in spanish. Also, I miss climbing gyms.
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  12. #62
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    Apr 2007
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    Tahoe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    At 45, if you are still inclined to say "hold my beer..." then it's time to put the beer down.
    To be fair, when I say 'Hold my beer', that's exactly what I'm trying to do.
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Park City
    Posts
    649
    My father in law is 82 and he still downhill and XC skis, plays hockey, and rows every morning it isn't freezing. I've noticed that he has slowed down a bit the last couple of years but he still gets out there. My dad is 76 and up until he broke his ankle trying to jump over a trailer hitch, he was still jumping over canals and putting in 10hr plus days on the farm. If I were to compare both of them, I would say the common thread is both are still working, both are still very active, both have kept their weight down at what works for them, and both watch what they eat and drink. Gives me hope that I can follow in their footsteps.
    The K-12 dude. You make a gnarly run like that and girls will get sterile just looking at you - Charles De Mar

  14. #64
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    Jan 2008
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    truckee
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    16,592
    Quote Originally Posted by TheK12 View Post
    My father in law is 82 and he still downhill and XC skis, plays hockey, and rows every morning it isn't freezing. I've noticed that he has slowed down a bit the last couple of years but he still gets out there. My dad is 76 and up until he broke his ankle trying to jump over a trailer hitch, he was still jumping over canals and putting in 10hr plus days on the farm. If I were to compare both of them, I would say the common thread is both are still working, both are still very active, both have kept their weight down at what works for them, and both watch what they eat and drink. Gives me hope that I can follow in their footsteps.
    That's the hard part--watching what you eat and drink.
    The realization hit me at 55--I was playing pond hockey. When you fall on your ass at 25 your ass hurts. When you fall on your ass at 55 every part of your body hurts--your ears, the hair on your head, your toes (if you can feel them).
    Two things happen sometime in your sixties more or less. Your reflexes slow down--stuff you used to be able to save you can't anymore, and things break a lot easier. Not a good combination. The whole mountain becomes no-fall terrain.

  15. #65
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    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,743
    That's the hard part--watching what you eat and drink.
    Or said a different way, you need to make that the easy part. It is a hard choice, but it is a choice. I feel like as you age, you don't have time for everything you did when you were younger. I'm consciously trying to be a 2 beers in bed by 9:30 type of guy. I'm a carpenter so I'm on the move all day. To me, waking up ready to go with a good attitude is so much more important than whatever beers 3-6 and a couple of whiskys used to mean.

  16. #66
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Big in Japan
    Posts
    46,412
    Everybody isn't the same. I read once that 73 or 4 is a real dividing line that determines how long and healthy one lives, and it may just be genetics. If you make it to that age with no serious chronic problems, and, yeah, eat smart and don't do anything stupid, you'll probably make it into the 90s fairly well. But, if you're starting to experience issues in your 60s, no matter how much you take care of yourself, you're no getting past mid 70s. Sorry. It's still pretty good, compared to even the early twentieth century, when the average life expectancy of an American male was 50. Vacciantions increased that number dramatically.

    I have a few questions. Is anybody indulging, or has indulged, in a lot of ibuprofen use? I have spoken to a few older ski patrollers and instructors who have warned me of problems when taking too much. Kidney issues. But, how much is too much? I'm careful, but, ain't nothing like three Advil gel caps even before skiing or exercising to hide the pains. Not every day, though.
    And, muscle pulls and strains. I stretch a lot, but still get nailed at moment's notice. Fuck, last week I just started walking in my ski boots and something happened in the front of my right knee that hung around for an hour. Is this a hydration issue? Diet solutions?

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Mostly the Elks, mostly.
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    913
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    The last think is to find new challenges that you don't age out of. I have friends that are struggling mentally because they can't just skiing there faces off anymore.
    This too.

    Great post Foggy.
    north bound horse.

  18. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    9,888
    When I started to get too old/fat/slow to go hard on the snowboard, I switched to skiing. That helped me slow down and dial back terrain choices. I also ski inbounds a lot more than I used to on the board, which is fun and less dangerous.

    Sciatica has been my battle. Had whole seasons where it took pain killers, muscle relaxers, weed, and booze just to go skiing. Lost a little weight and that has been kept in check, lately anyway. Stretching, rollers, balls, etc helped too.

    Crashing- I've always been very good at split second decision making and calculating risks while doing sports like skiing and biking. Knowing your abilities goes a long way towards not writing checks your ass can't cash. Also, knowing how to fall at low, medium, and high speed was something I learned early on as a kid. Skateboarding, BMX, and team sports like football really taught me how to absorb impacts without sustaining major injuries.

    I want to be that old guy who still gets out skiing off piste every day till happy hour. That's the goal. We'll see


    And of course: "knock on wood"

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
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    13,920
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    I have a few questions. Is anybody indulging, or has indulged, in a lot of ibuprofen use? I have spoken to a few older ski patrollers and instructors who have warned me of problems when taking too much. Kidney issues. But, how much is too much? I'm careful, but, ain't nothing like three Advil gel caps even before skiing or exercising to hide the pains. Not every day, though.
    Between Feb '14 and Aug '19, I took roughly 15,050 Ibuprofen (average of 7.5/day for 5.5 years). Who knows what it did to me but getting off of it was a big part of the decision to get the knee replaced.

    While I think it's bad, my opinion means about the same as old patrollers and instructors. Nothing
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    At the beach
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    14,947
    Quote Originally Posted by Kinnikinnick View Post
    Pfffffftt 45!!!

    Yeah, yoga. I’m convinced that I’d be a cripple without yoga.

    But dial it back. Which do you want more:

    -to launch big air on the bike today or be biking in 20 years

    -skiing the moguls or skiing in 20 years

    You are in the long game, but thought you were in a short game


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Pretty much all that and to add I will not do anything anymore where my inner voice tells me there is a possibility I could fuck myself up good. So all your hair on fire exploits are done for me.
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  21. #71
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Mostly the Elks, mostly.
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    913
    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    I have a few questions. Is anybody indulging, or has indulged, in a lot of ibuprofen use? I have spoken to a few older ski patrollers and instructors who have warned me of problems when taking too much.
    Limb Preservation Surgeon cut me off ibuprofen. Said some studies suggest it inhibits bone repair.
    Also, some people think the body heals based on the inflammatory response, so if you take anti-inflammatory pills too often .. no healing, only masking injury. I know some surgeons who try PRP insist on zero ibuprofen.

    My anecdotal study of 1 supports the theory, ymmv.
    north bound horse.

  22. #72
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    tahoe
    Posts
    3,296
    Walk your bike around the gnar sections
    Don’t ski so fast and avoid moguls......I ski so much faster at the resort and that’s when I get hurt. Sounds like you have no snowpack right now..... but touring for turns is much safer because of the speed difference

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Big in Japan
    Posts
    46,412
    My orthopedist in Colorado said, no moguls after my meniscus surgery. No intense landings too. Duh. So my ski instructor at Taos taught me how to ski moguls when I have to, correctly and safely. Gold.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  24. #74
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    231
    The older you get, the better you used to be! Except, a big part of succeeding in the age, wisdom, flexibility thing is between your ears. Listen to your body and don't take that last hard run when you know you are partially wiped out. Keep getting out there doing what you love but keep it fresh with different approaches to having fun at the resort, like seeing how smoothly you can ski as opposed to going large or mach loonie or only seeking the gnar. Do a new tour or explore someplace unkown and just be glad to get out there. Get a nice bike and try another acitivity to keep it varied and interesting. Find friends who will support you and also are committed to keeping it fresh and life affirming.

  25. #75
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    208
    Can't really add much...lots of good advice here. Dial back a bit, assess things, don't ski (or bike) at your high-end limits. Might miss some of the adrenalin but you'll greatly reduce consequences. Shit happens stuff is still in play but you can't do much about that. Nearing 67 now and still having great days in the mountains but conservative around moguls / tree's & wear a helmet. Other riders and their questionable skills & antics alarm me more than anything the slope throws at me.

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