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  1. #20051
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    Nothing says reputable like a full length copy pasta with misinfo and no source given.
    j'ai des grands instants de lucididididididididi

  2. #20052
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    ^I hope so. Really do.

    Maybe the doctor is a bit freewheeling and casual with his prediction tho? You can feel the institutions not wanting to be as bold in that claim and distancing:
    In response to a request for comment, Massachusetts General Hospital issued a statement acknowledging that Dr. Ryan’s remarks had been shared “from an individual’s personal notes.”

    “These notes lack context, details, and nuance,” the statement said, noting they fail to reflect “the role that vaccines play in mitigating severe disease or death,” or to note that at-risk people should “continue to take extra precautions.”
    Which I don't blame them. But let's hope, stay vigilant and track this accordingly.

    Here's a site - the article is based on a conversation. I have no idea if this site is reputable: https://trialsitenews.com/120773-2/

  3. #20053
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    I keep reading the title as -To-Vaginate-or-Not-...
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  4. #20054
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    95% of England has immunity either through infection or vaccination (72% fully vaccinated rate). They are dropping mandatory masks in public and vaccine passport rules, and no longer recommend people work from home. No more masks in secondary schools.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-60047438

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...hts/antibodies

  5. #20055
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post
    I knew that.
    more to clarify that i wasn't endorsing his joke

  6. #20056
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted reborn View Post
    It's been stated over and over - personal attacks are fine. Personal attacks that include violence are not OK.
    YOU SHUT YOUR WHORE MOUTH!
    Beneficent Oversight Committee Member.

  7. #20057
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tri-Ungulate View Post
    Remaining question is how much you guys worry about possible autoimmune off effects from epitopes generated by the modified constructs, or things like ADE. I know you guys take this into account, but how prevalent is it?
    Exceedingly rare.

    First off, while any amino acid sequence conformation may be an immune epitope, it's important to note that over-whelmingly most 8-15 mer amino acid sequences are not. Secondly, my understanding on autoimmune epitope generation as it relates to antibodies, is that it relies much more on functional molecular mimicry of the 3D shape of the region being recognized, than linear sequence conservation. Third, the deviations made to stabilize the prefusion Spike, namely alteration of the putative furin cleavage site at the boundery of S1/S2 and 2 rigid Proline-Proline mutations in the S2 heptad regions that prevent helix re-arrangment, were already introduced in V1 vaccines and now with ~1Billion+ doses given remain unlinked as hot spots for either antibody binding and induction of autoimmunity from the vaccines. All of the other changes in Omicron vaccine constructs mirror the actual changes in the Omicron virus and have been vetted by nature.

    My limited overlap with ADE is primarily with Dengue fever. Dengue viruses (4 serotypes) enter into human cells through a clatharin mediated endosomal pathway. Normally this involves a re-arrangement of the 90 Envelope dimers into 60 trimers on the viral surface, with a region called the "fusion loop" of each forming a triad that is inserted into the cell lipid bilayer to initiate endocytosis. This fusion loop is nearly 100% conserved across all flaviviruses (zika, dengue, JEV, WNV, YFV), and is a hot spot for antibodies to bind. However upon secondary infection with another Dengue strain, instead of blocking entry, these antibodies actually enhance endosomal uptake of the virus through antibody-FC receptor mediated interactions, and the viruses are then able to escape from endosomal/lysosomal degradation pathways back into the cytoplasm and therefore enhance disease by increasing the #'s of viruses infecting cells.

    Corona viruses on the other hand, only sparingly use endosomal pathways in vivo, and instead rely on Ace2 cell surface receptor-mediated uptake as their main pathway directly inside the cell to the cytoplasm. Because of this, these infections do not/have much less chance at generating ADE through antibody-FC uptake. It's also why Hydroxychloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, is of little to no value for treatment. There most certainly are other mechanisms for ADE generation, but none have so far been identified for coronaviruses.

    As an aside, in the early-mid 2000's I was involved with a protein-subunit vaccine approach for a T cell vaccine against Leishmaniaisis, a eukaryotic parasitic disease transmitted by biting sand flies around the world in the tropics, that made it into Phase1 trials in the US and phase 2/2B trials in Brazil. One of the proteins in the vax (identified by both T cell epitopes and serology in Leish patients) was 60% identical to it's human protein counterpart! And so we were quite keen to look for cross-reactivity that might be a sign of autoimmunity. Using both PBMC's and sera from phase I and II vaccinated individuals before and 4 weeks post 3rd shot to look at T cell and antibody responses, assays with the Leish protein gave robust responses post vax while there were virtually none to the human counterpart protein despite having plenty of regions containing amino stretches with complete identity across the 2 proteins. It was pretty striking to me really, how the major epitopes clustered in the regions of difference and were absent in the regions of high similarity.
    Move upside and let the man go through...

  8. #20058
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    I keep reading the title as -To-Vaginate-or-Not-...

    Vaginate. Always.
    Why is there any debate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mod Team View Post
    YOU SHUT YOUR WHORE MOUTH!
    Please consult the rage call generator. Unfortunately it’s broken.

    BUT FUCK YOU IN THE ASS WITH A RUSTY KÄSTLE COVERED IN COVID AND SANTORUM FOLLOWED BY A VIKING DUMPSTER FIRE FUNERAL YOU CUM GUZZLING TEXAS SKIER

    Ahem. Have a nice day.

  9. #20059
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    Exceedingly rare.

    First off, while any amino acid sequence conformation may be an immune epitope, it's important to note that over-whelmingly most 8-15 mer amino acid sequences are not. Secondly, my understanding on autoimmune epitope generation as it relates to antibodies, is that it relies much more on functional molecular mimicry of the 3D shape of the region being recognized, than linear sequence conservation. Third, the deviations made to stabilize the prefusion Spike, namely alteration of the putative furin cleavage site at the boundery of S1/S2 and 2 rigid Proline-Proline mutations in the S2 heptad regions that prevent helix re-arrangment, were already introduced in V1 vaccines and now with ~1Billion+ doses given remain unlinked as hot spots for either antibody binding and induction of autoimmunity from the vaccines. All of the other changes in Omicron vaccine constructs mirror the actual changes in the Omicron virus and have been vetted by nature.

    My limited overlap with ADE is primarily with Dengue fever. Dengue viruses (4 serotypes) enter into human cells through a clatharin mediated endosomal pathway. Normally this involves a re-arrangement of the 90 Envelope dimers into 60 trimers on the viral surface, with a region called the "fusion loop" of each forming a triad that is inserted into the cell lipid bilayer to initiate endocytosis. This fusion loop is nearly 100% conserved across all flaviviruses (zika, dengue, JEV, WNV, YFV), and is a hot spot for antibodies to bind. However upon secondary infection with another Dengue strain, instead of blocking entry, these antibodies actually enhance endosomal uptake of the virus through antibody-FC receptor mediated interactions, and the viruses are then able to escape from endosomal/lysosomal degradation pathways back into the cytoplasm and therefore enhance disease by increasing the #'s of viruses infecting cells.

    Corona viruses on the other hand, only sparingly use endosomal pathways in vivo, and instead rely on Ace2 cell surface receptor-mediated uptake as their main pathway directly inside the cell to the cytoplasm. Because of this, these infections do not/have much less chance at generating ADE through antibody-FC uptake. It's also why Hydroxychloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, is of little to no value for treatment. There most certainly are other mechanisms for ADE generation, but none have so far been identified for coronaviruses.

    As an aside, in the early-mid 2000's I was involved with a protein-subunit vaccine approach for a T cell vaccine against Leishmaniaisis, a eukaryotic parasitic disease transmitted by biting sand flies around the world in the tropics, that made it into Phase1 trials in the US and phase 2/2B trials in Brazil. One of the proteins in the vax (identified by both T cell epitopes and serology in Leish patients) was 60% identical to it's human protein counterpart! And so we were quite keen to look for cross-reactivity that might be a sign of autoimmunity. Using both PBMC's and sera from phase I and II vaccinated individuals before and 4 weeks post 3rd shot to look at T cell and antibody responses, assays with the Leish protein gave robust responses post vax while there were virtually none to the human counterpart protein despite having plenty of regions containing amino stretches with complete identity across the 2 proteins. It was pretty striking to me really, how the major epitopes clustered in the regions of difference and were absent in the regions of high similarity.
    Oh yeah? Where’d you hear all that…CNN?

  10. #20060
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    y'know often you can read something scientific and get a general Idea

    but i didn't get one bit of that ^^
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  11. #20061
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    Mar 2019
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    To Vaccinate or Not---The Rat Flu Odyssey Continues

    Quote Originally Posted by NakedShorts View Post
    Don't shoot the messanger. You do know that the Pharma companies are the biggest sponsors of TV, print, and our Political woes?
    In your case, the messenger should be shot(**METAPHORICALLY, this is a METAPHOR**)

  12. #20062
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    y'know often you can read something scientific and get a general Idea

    but i didn't get one bit of that ^^
    Something about Leishmaniasis

    I think that’s what happened after Gerry Garcia died.

    It’s related to Weirding.

  13. #20063
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    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Something about Leishmaniasis

    I think that’s what happened after Gerry Garcia died.

    It’s related to Weirding.
    Doxed!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  14. #20064
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    well my point would be that doing my own research is impossible
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #20065
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    anti-vax types are burning their carhartt since the company has decided to continue to require vaccination of its workers.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    j'ai des grands instants de lucididididididididi

  16. #20066
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    High school contact tracers called today. Kid had close contact to a student who tested positive in extracurricular activity Tuesday. They're not even recommending isolation. Everyone was masked so it's business as usual unless symptoms arise. Recommend testing 5 days after the close contact, but not required. I guess they're done trying. Keep your masks on and get back to work LOL!
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  17. #20067
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    When you lose the heavily tattoo'd finger crowd....

  18. #20068
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    AP level article speaking to the importance of using vaccines while they are still effective to curb risk of varients.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/med...nl8?li=BBnb7Kz

    Expect more worrisome variants after omicron, scientists say
    By LAURA UNGAR, AP Science Writer - Saturday


    Get ready to learn more Greek letters. Scientists warn that omicron’s whirlwind advance practically ensures it won’t be the last version of the coronavirus to worry the world.

    Every infection provides a chance for the virus to mutate, and omicron has an edge over its predecessors: It spreads way faster despite emerging on a planet with a stronger patchwork of immunity from vaccines and prior illness.

    That means more people in whom the virus can further evolve. Experts don’t know what the next variants will look like or how they might shape the pandemic, but they say there’s no guarantee the sequels of omicron will cause milder illness or that existing vaccines will work against them.

    They urge wider vaccination now, while today's shots still work.

    "The faster omicron spreads, the more opportunities there are for mutation, potentially leading to more variants,” Leonardo Martinez, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Boston University, said.

    Since it emerged in mid-November, omicron has raced across the globe like fire through dry grass. Research shows the variant is at least twice as contagious as delta and at least four times as contagious as the original version of the virus.

    Omicron is more likely than delta to reinfect individuals who previously had COVID-19 and to cause “breakthrough infections” in vaccinated people while also attacking the unvaccinated. The World Health Organization reported a record 15 million new COVID-19 cases for the week of Jan. 3-9, a 55% increase from the previous week.

    Along with keeping comparatively healthy people out of work and school, the ease with which the variant spreads increases the odds the virus will infect and linger inside people with weakened immune systems - giving it more time to develop potent mutations.

    “It’s the longer, persistent infections that seem to be the most likely breeding grounds for new variants,” said Dr. Stuart Campbell Ray, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins University. "It’s only when you have very widespread infection that you’re going to provide the opportunity for that to occur.”

    Because omicron appears to cause less severe disease than delta, its behavior has kindled hope that it could be the start of a trend that eventually makes the virus milder like a common cold.

    It's a possibility, experts say, given that viruses don’t spread well if they kill their hosts very quickly. But viruses don’t always get less deadly over time.

    A variant could also achieve its main goal - replicating - if infected people developed mild symptoms initially, spread the virus by interacting with others, then got very sick later, Ray explained by way of example.

    “People have wondered whether the virus will evolve to mildness. But there’s no particular reason for it to do so,” he said. “I don’t think we can be confident that the virus will become less lethal over time.”

    Getting progressively better at evading immunity helps a virus to survive over the long term. When SARS-CoV-2 first struck, no one was immune. But infections and vaccines have conferred at least some immunity to much of the world, so the virus must adapt.

    There are many possible avenues for evolution. Animals could potentially incubate and unleash new variants. Pet dogs and cats, deer and farm-raised mink are only a few of the animals vulnerable to the virus, which can potentially mutate within them and leap back to people.

    Another potential route: With both omicron and delta circulating, people may get double infections that could spawn what Ray calls “Frankenvariants,” hybrids with characteristics of both types.

    When new variants do develop, scientists said it’s still very difficult to know from genetic features which ones might take off. For example, omicron has many more mutations than previous variants, around 30 in the spike protein that lets it attach to human cells. But the so-called IHU variant identified in France and being monitored by the WHO has 46 mutations and doesn’t seem to have spread much at all.

    To curb the emergence of variants, scientists stress continuing with public health measures such as masking and getting vaccinated. While omicron is better able to evade immunity than delta, experts said, vaccines still offer protection and booster shots greatly reduce serious illness, hospitalizations and deaths.

    Anne Thomas, a 64-year-old IT analyst in Westerly, Rhode Island, said she's fully vaccinated and boosted and also tries to stay safe by mostly staying home while her state has one of the highest COVID-19 case rates in the U.S.

    “I have no doubt at all that these viruses are going to continue to mutate and we’re going to be dealing with this for a very long time," she said.

    Ray likened vaccines to armor for humanity that greatly hinders viral spread even if it doesn't completely stop it. For a virus that spreads exponentially, he said, "anything that curbs transmission can have a great effect.” Also, when vaccinated people get sick, Ray said their illness is usually milder and clears more quickly, leaving less time to spawn dangerous variants.

    Experts say the virus won't become endemic like the flu as long as global vaccination rates are so low. During a recent press conference, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that protecting people from future variants — including those that may be fully resistant to today's shots — depends on ending global vaccine inequity.

    Tedros said he’d like to see 70% of people in every country vaccinated by mid-year. Currently, there are dozens of countries where less than a quarter of the population is fully vaccinated, according to Johns Hopkins University statistics. And in the United States, many people continue to resist available vaccines.

    “These huge unvaccinated swaths in the U.S., Africa, Asia, Latin America and elsewhere are basically variant factories,” said Dr. Prabhat Jha of the Centre for Global Health Research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. “It's been a colossal failure in global leadership that we have not been able to do this.”

    In the meantime, new variants are inevitable, said Louis Mansky, director of the Institute for Molecular Virology at the University of Minnesota.

    With so many unvaccinated people, he said, “the virus is still kind of in control of what's going on.”

  19. #20069
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    I fucking hate sand flies

  20. #20070
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    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    High school contact tracers called today. Kid had close contact to a student who tested positive in extracurricular activity Tuesday. They're not even recommending isolation. Everyone was masked so it's business as usual unless symptoms arise. Recommend testing 5 days after the close contact, but not required. I guess they're done trying. Keep your masks on and get back to work LOL!
    HCW's who are exposed to covid patients every day--how often do you suppose they are tested?
    At this point it makes little sense to test everyone who is exposed unless they become symptomatic--especially when both parties are masked. (Yes I realize that N95's that HCW's wear are more effective than the cloth masks, flimsy "surgical" masks, and bandanas that most people are wearing or not wearing these days.)

  21. #20071
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    HCW's who are exposed to covid patients every day--how often do you suppose they are tested?
    At this point it makes little sense to test everyone who is exposed unless they become symptomatic--especially when both parties are masked. (Yes I realize that N95's that HCW's wear are more effective than the cloth masks, flimsy "surgical" masks, and bandanas that most people are wearing or not wearing these days.)
    Thanks. agreed.

    I'm surprisingly calm.. We're all fully boosted and the kid used her part time job money to buy a couple boxes of FDA approved KN95s for the entire crew to use. Use the tools we have to find a reasonable compromise between safety and sanity. I'm good with this for now. Masks suck, REALLY suck but so does dying and putting others at greater risk.. They also test (pool testing) them every Tuesday so there's that. But not everyone agreed to that testing.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  22. #20072
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    There has not been much if any testing up here far as I know and I don't se any reason to gett tested, wear masks, distance & vax,

    long as I can taste Coffee in the morning and Pinot grigio at night its all good
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  23. #20073
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    Jun 2020
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    in a freezer in Italy
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    Yeah right up until when can't it's all fun and games

  24. #20074
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    2,342
    Quote Originally Posted by CarlMega View Post
    AP level article speaking to the importance of using vaccines while they are still effective to curb risk of varients.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/med...nl8?li=BBnb7Kz

    Expect more worrisome variants after omicron, scientists say
    By LAURA UNGAR, AP Science Writer - Saturday


    Get ready to learn more Greek letters. Scientists warn that omicron’s whirlwind advance practically ensures it won’t be the last version of the coronavirus to worry the world.

    Every infection provides a chance for the virus to mutate, and omicron has an edge over its predecessors: It spreads way faster despite emerging on a planet with a stronger patchwork of immunity from vaccines and prior illness.

    That means more people in whom the virus can further evolve. Experts don’t know what the next variants will look like or how they might shape the pandemic, but they say there’s no guarantee the sequels of omicron will cause milder illness or that existing vaccines will work against them.

    They urge wider vaccination now, while today's shots still work.

    "The faster omicron spreads, the more opportunities there are for mutation, potentially leading to more variants,” Leonardo Martinez, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Boston University, said.

    Since it emerged in mid-November, omicron has raced across the globe like fire through dry grass. Research shows the variant is at least twice as contagious as delta and at least four times as contagious as the original version of the virus.

    Omicron is more likely than delta to reinfect individuals who previously had COVID-19 and to cause “breakthrough infections” in vaccinated people while also attacking the unvaccinated. The World Health Organization reported a record 15 million new COVID-19 cases for the week of Jan. 3-9, a 55% increase from the previous week.

    Along with keeping comparatively healthy people out of work and school, the ease with which the variant spreads increases the odds the virus will infect and linger inside people with weakened immune systems - giving it more time to develop potent mutations.

    “It’s the longer, persistent infections that seem to be the most likely breeding grounds for new variants,” said Dr. Stuart Campbell Ray, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins University. "It’s only when you have very widespread infection that you’re going to provide the opportunity for that to occur.”

    Because omicron appears to cause less severe disease than delta, its behavior has kindled hope that it could be the start of a trend that eventually makes the virus milder like a common cold.

    It's a possibility, experts say, given that viruses don’t spread well if they kill their hosts very quickly. But viruses don’t always get less deadly over time.

    A variant could also achieve its main goal - replicating - if infected people developed mild symptoms initially, spread the virus by interacting with others, then got very sick later, Ray explained by way of example.

    “People have wondered whether the virus will evolve to mildness. But there’s no particular reason for it to do so,” he said. “I don’t think we can be confident that the virus will become less lethal over time.”

    Getting progressively better at evading immunity helps a virus to survive over the long term. When SARS-CoV-2 first struck, no one was immune. But infections and vaccines have conferred at least some immunity to much of the world, so the virus must adapt.

    There are many possible avenues for evolution. Animals could potentially incubate and unleash new variants. Pet dogs and cats, deer and farm-raised mink are only a few of the animals vulnerable to the virus, which can potentially mutate within them and leap back to people.

    Another potential route: With both omicron and delta circulating, people may get double infections that could spawn what Ray calls “Frankenvariants,” hybrids with characteristics of both types.

    When new variants do develop, scientists said it’s still very difficult to know from genetic features which ones might take off. For example, omicron has many more mutations than previous variants, around 30 in the spike protein that lets it attach to human cells. But the so-called IHU variant identified in France and being monitored by the WHO has 46 mutations and doesn’t seem to have spread much at all.

    To curb the emergence of variants, scientists stress continuing with public health measures such as masking and getting vaccinated. While omicron is better able to evade immunity than delta, experts said, vaccines still offer protection and booster shots greatly reduce serious illness, hospitalizations and deaths.

    Anne Thomas, a 64-year-old IT analyst in Westerly, Rhode Island, said she's fully vaccinated and boosted and also tries to stay safe by mostly staying home while her state has one of the highest COVID-19 case rates in the U.S.

    “I have no doubt at all that these viruses are going to continue to mutate and we’re going to be dealing with this for a very long time," she said.

    Ray likened vaccines to armor for humanity that greatly hinders viral spread even if it doesn't completely stop it. For a virus that spreads exponentially, he said, "anything that curbs transmission can have a great effect.” Also, when vaccinated people get sick, Ray said their illness is usually milder and clears more quickly, leaving less time to spawn dangerous variants.

    Experts say the virus won't become endemic like the flu as long as global vaccination rates are so low. During a recent press conference, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that protecting people from future variants — including those that may be fully resistant to today's shots — depends on ending global vaccine inequity.

    Tedros said he’d like to see 70% of people in every country vaccinated by mid-year. Currently, there are dozens of countries where less than a quarter of the population is fully vaccinated, according to Johns Hopkins University statistics. And in the United States, many people continue to resist available vaccines.

    “These huge unvaccinated swaths in the U.S., Africa, Asia, Latin America and elsewhere are basically variant factories,” said Dr. Prabhat Jha of the Centre for Global Health Research at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. “It's been a colossal failure in global leadership that we have not been able to do this.”

    In the meantime, new variants are inevitable, said Louis Mansky, director of the Institute for Molecular Virology at the University of Minnesota.

    With so many unvaccinated people, he said, “the virus is still kind of in control of what's going on.”
    Thank you -
    valuable information.

    Thank you. skiJ

  25. #20075
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    Quote Originally Posted by ötzi View Post
    Yeah right up until when can't it's all fun and games
    I thought the game "WHO FARTED?!?!?!?!?" was great when I couldn't smell anything a year ago..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

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