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  1. #1
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    50/50 setup for a gal beginner..Questions

    Her: Girlfriend is getting into skiing. She she skied a few times when she was younger but hasn't skied in a long time. 5'7, 120lbs, decently athletic. She's most excited about touring but still needs to gain lots of ski skills. I expect us to go to the resort 3-4 times and walk around in the woods maybe twice this winter.

    I recommended spending money on boots so we went to a boot fitter and ended up with a Rossi Alltrack 70. It fit her foot well and has a walk mode. No holes for pin bindings.

    I'm thinking of a lightweight alpine ski with lightweight frame bindings, maybe like an Marker F12 for 50/50 use for her. Does a setup like this make sense?

    What's a good length of ski for her? Any idea on weights to aim for?

    Any other advice greatly appreciated. First time shopping for a gal so very out of my wheelhouse.

  2. #2
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    Q: What's worse than dating a girl that doesn't ski?
    A: Dating a girl that wants to learn how to ski.

    Jokes aside, you limited yourself to frame style binders with the boot you chose. I'd trust the Guardians over the F12s and they seem to have a lower stack height. Ski choice isn't really any different with women than men, probably want something lightish to make up for the weight of the frame binding and something shorter and more maneuverable (chin to nose height) with some sidecut, tip/tail rocker. A QST 99 or 106 type ski.

  3. #3
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    get a short & soft ski, the womens models are good cuz they make them for smaller people

    a few years back i got GF some Liberty Genisis which were I think 159cm long, soft tips n tails & 116 under foot

    with frame bindings and skins we can walk around on easy BC terrain
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #4
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    1. She won't really progress skiing like 5 times a season...
    2. Where are you located? It makes a difference in the ski recommendation.
    3. Friends don't let friends teach their SOs to ski. Find her a decent instructor.
    4. Overall, your idea of light alpine skis and lightish frame bindings is about as good as you can do here since her boots don't have tech fittings. I'd look for something about 165 in length (cuz she's 5'7"), fairly soft (cuz she's 120#), and around 100 underfoot with a high teens radius. I'd prioritize these things over weight. Many alpine skis these days are fairly light.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

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  5. #5
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    116 seems a bit wide for some one just learning to edge. Especially a light person.

    My wife is a solid intermediate plus skier but enjoys her easy to use Shiva 9.

    Not sure if it is great learning ski but it is super versatile. Will go plenty charger for her but also skis well on lazy days. Camber underfoot provide moderate grip on firm snow, as does the 90mm underfoot. Rise in tip/tail makes for easy float and pivot in 3D snow.

    Just does not comply in mank. Not really burly enough to crush through mixed crap.

    No input on frame bindings. Have you though of putting together a basic alpine set up and just renting a touring rig the two times you go for a hike in the woods.

    And then next year find a lighter more tour oriented ski and binding if it turns out she is into it? Shot will be cheaper in spring.

  6. #6
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    Nov 2016
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    Thanks everyone for the input!

    Quote Originally Posted by GoSlowGoFar View Post
    Q: What's worse than dating a girl that doesn't ski?
    A: Dating a girl that wants to learn how to ski.

    Jokes aside, you limited yourself to frame style binders with the boot you chose. I'd trust the Guardians over the F12s and they seem to have a lower stack height. Ski choice isn't really any different with women than men, probably want something lightish to make up for the weight of the frame binding and something shorter and more maneuverable (chin to nose height) with some sidecut, tip/tail rocker. A QST 99 or 106 type ski.
    Hah, yeah I've heard this before, going to be pretty aware of this. I didn't talk to my dad for a week when he tried to teach me stick.

    So we haven't bought the boot yet. Do you recommend going with something that is pin capable? I just think those boots are going to be way stiffer and more expensive. Skiing is an expensive sport to get into so trying to keep it reasonable (not a dentist).

    Quote Originally Posted by auvgeek View Post
    1. She won't really progress skiing like 5 times a season...
    2. Where are you located? It makes a difference in the ski recommendation.
    3. Friends don't let friends teach their SOs to ski. Find her a decent instructor.
    4. Overall, your idea of light alpine skis and lightish frame bindings is about as good as you can do here since her boots don't have tech fittings. I'd look for something about 165 in length (cuz she's 5'7"), fairly soft (cuz she's 120#), and around 100 underfoot with a high teens radius. I'd prioritize these things over weight. Many alpine skis these days are fairly light.
    We're starting with 5x a season but hoping to ramp up in the following years.
    2. northern idaho
    3. yep. keeping this very much in mind
    4. Are you suggesting a a boot that is pin binding capable? Like I said above, aren't boots that are pin capable going to be stiffer/more expensive and not geared towards beginners? Big thanks on the ski recommendations, I think that gives me a category to shop in

    Quote Originally Posted by Ottime View Post
    116 seems a bit wide for some one just learning to edge. Especially a light person.

    My wife is a solid intermediate plus skier but enjoys her easy to use Shiva 9.

    Not sure if it is great learning ski but it is super versatile. Will go plenty charger for her but also skis well on lazy days. Camber underfoot provide moderate grip on firm snow, as does the 90mm underfoot. Rise in tip/tail makes for easy float and pivot in 3D snow.

    Just does not comply in mank. Not really burly enough to crush through mixed crap.

    No input on frame bindings. Have you though of putting together a basic alpine set up and just renting a touring rig the two times you go for a hike in the woods.

    And then next year find a lighter more tour oriented ski and binding if it turns out she is into it? Shot will be cheaper in spring.
    I'll check out the Shiva. I'm not too worried about finding the perfect ski, just something that will help her learn easily. Yeah, I think the second pair will come later. I first want to see if she enjoys it and whether she likes the resort or BC more. So for now an all in one set up is ideal.

  7. #7
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    well she is an intermediate who skied a lot of years poorly so not a great skier but ok,

    Its usually soft conditions around here

    got some lessons', doing well

    demoed the Liberty and we also borrowed the neighbor's women's wailer 112's

    she liked the Liberty more than the wailer cuz it was easier to ski probably cuz it was short & soft
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  8. #8
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    i did this a few years ago and lived to tell the tale.

    We started her on super short skis, like 164s (she's 5'10). i think you should do the same. she skis a 170 now.

    We put her on Soul 7s and now she loves that ski unfortunately. but it's probably the perfect ski

    frame bindings, however, were a mixed bag. we did some touring but they're just so awful that there's a decent chance she hates backcountry because of them, especially if her boots no walk mode.

    this year, pin bindings and touring boots.
    single? always know what to say with Keys
    www.thekeysapp.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by brundo View Post
    So we haven't bought the boot yet. Do you recommend going with something that is pin capable? I just think those boots are going to be way stiffer and more expensive. Skiing is an expensive sport to get into so trying to keep it reasonable (not a dentist).

    We're starting with 5x a season but hoping to ramp up in the following years.
    2. northern idaho
    3. yep. keeping this very much in mind
    4. Are you suggesting a a boot that is pin binding capable? Like I said above, aren't boots that are pin capable going to be stiffer/more expensive and not geared towards beginners? Big thanks on the ski recommendations, I think that gives me a category to shop in
    Skiing is expensive and I hear that, but there are plenty of soft, tech compatible boots that don't break the bank. Finding one to fit her foot is a different story. It's hard because if she likes touring at all, she'll want tech binders. And then she'll potentially need a whole new dedicated touring setup ($$$). Plus an avy class and avy gear. So the difference between a $400 boot and a $600 boot is pretty minimal in the grand scheme of things if they last her more than one season. Maybe consider something like the Hawx XTD 95 or Tecnica Cochise W 95, Lange XT3 90 W, etc. I'm guessing because she's 5'7" that's her foot is a size 24 (or larger), which makes availability a bit easier than if she was a size 22 or size 23.

    I'm not too worried about finding the perfect ski, just something that will help her learn easily. Yeah, I think the second pair will come later.
    Smart. Somebody posted this link in gear swap: https://theskimonster.com/products/ski-outlet/ Seems like good deals on beginner skis if you can't find a used deal.

    Eg. https://theskimonster.com/products/armada-arw-96/

    Edit: I'm not suggesting a tech setup to start. I'd get something super cheap with inbounds bindings and rent a touring setup. Heck, you might be better off renting all the gear to start until she's convinced she likes it enough to buy her own gear.
    Last edited by auvgeek; 12-01-2020 at 04:35 PM.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  10. #10
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    Nov 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by brundo View Post
    Thanks everyone for the input!



    Hah, yeah I've heard this before, going to be pretty aware of this. I didn't talk to my dad for a week when he tried to teach me stick.

    So we haven't bought the boot yet. Do you recommend going with something that is pin capable? I just think those boots are going to be way stiffer and more expensive. Skiing is an expensive sport to get into so trying to keep it reasonable (not a dentist).



    We're starting with 5x a season but hoping to ramp up in the following years.
    2. northern idaho
    3. yep. keeping this very much in mind
    4. Are you suggesting a a boot that is pin binding capable? Like I said above, aren't boots that are pin capable going to be stiffer/more expensive and not geared towards beginners? Big thanks on the ski recommendations, I think that gives me a category to shop in



    I'll check out the Shiva. I'm not too worried about finding the perfect ski, just something that will help her learn easily. Yeah, I think the second pair will come later. I first want to see if she enjoys it and whether she likes the resort or BC more. So for now an all in one set up is ideal.
    In terms of boots, you could probably find good deals on entry level pin boots like the Women's MTN Explore for a good price. They're a little stiffer than the Alltrack which is probably a good thing to be honest. They'd also work with the Guardians and any pin binding. I think the ski recommendations and sizing (shorter at first) are good.

    I'd say save your money on skis, try to find a gently used tech compatible boot that fits well, and keep your eye out for a deal on Shifts and you'd be starting her off on a much better path.

  11. #11
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    My partner was in sort of the same boat a few years ago. Better to have a friend/real instructor teach for sure, but I also have no idea how to teach skiing.

    Would seriously advise against frame bindings. They are a lot to carry for a big dude, let alone a smaller person. We rented some skis with frame bindings a few times and she hated it, hardly had any energy to ski down after dragging those things uphill. The next year we got a real setup and I gave her my Vipecs and now she outpaces me on the up. Vipecs would be my choice for someone who is learning, light and supposedly safer. We had a pretty easy time finding clearance AT boots in her size on STP, but really got kind of lucky on the fit. I really think you'd be better off going full alpine until she learns some and maybe rent AT gear and see how she likes it. A 50/50 setup might just suck at both.

  12. #12
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    She probably needs a thorough physical examination to be certain she's up for the rigors of all that activity. We have a number of physicians and physical therapists here on the forum. They now have the technological abilities to conduct such tests on the forum. If she'd like to know she won't break a leg or, for heaven's sake, die pursuing these dangers, I can't over-emphasize the importance of this physical examination.

    Perhaps one of our esteemed colleagues can tell you what you'll need to do to safeguard your girl in these dangerous endeavors.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    607
    Really appreciate everyone's help again.

    In summary, buy skis short to start with, maybe 160ish in length. Get an AT boot and Shifts or rent for AT.

    Moar questions:

    - Any suggestions for a soft women's AT boot with a 102mm last, ideally similar fit to the rossi all track 70? How much of a gamble is it to buy boots online knowing her foot's last? The boots I'm seeing that are softer AT boots are still 90-95 flex. I'm worried this is going to be too stiff for her. She's pretty light (probably closer to 115) and she wants to get stronger but currently is not very strong. Are these boots going to be too stiff for a light, beginner, who isn't that strong?

    - Something else just occurred to me, would she be a good fit for the lundahl Shift binding (or whatever people are calling it? Seems like it might be cheaper than shifts. For someone who doesn't need performance but wants to prioritize safety. Are tectons or vipecs or kingpins good alternatives to the shift?

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    I'm suprised no body has asked for the nekid picts ?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #15
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    Oh, XXX, you are sooooo slow on the uptake. Read my post, foo.

  16. #16
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    Jan 2019
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    I've been through this man. A good option may be to just get a cheap resort setup and an even cheaper used nordic bc setup in the beginning. Keep it simple. No fucking w/ pins & skins, just the fundamentals of traveling the wild snow. We lived in ID for a bit too, plenty of forest to ski in and lots of places to pick up decent used gear.

    For the resort my wife started on some cheap used entry level boots and used soft beginner skis. After a successful 1st season on beginner gear she moved up to race boots/skis and hasn't looked back. She learned to tour on some old Tua's w/ Rivas and Asolo extremes for under $100 (Thrift store find).

    In the beginning it's all about her comfort...which as you have seen, your fellow mags have expressed an interest in providing.

    But seriously, gear that she's comfortable in and excited to use will make all the difference, the goldilocks setup doesn't exist so keep it cheap while she figures out what she wants.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by splat View Post
    Oh, XXX, you are sooooo slow on the uptake. Read my post, foo.
    I did notice your very suttle post, very different than the usual nekid pics or GTFO
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  18. #18
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    Dec 2003
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    Girlfriend is getting into skiing. She she skied a few times when she was younger but hasn't skied in a long time.
    Maybe you should just take her skiing on some rental gear before debating whether someone who can't ski needs tech bindings?
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  19. #19
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    You are giving her a false sense of hope/excitement/joy/whatever by enabling her to go backcountry skiing before she knows how to ski.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    Maybe you should just take her skiing on some rental gear before debating whether someone who can't ski needs tech bindings?
    In 2020 the boobed jongs go straight to the backcountry.




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  21. #21
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    Oct 2010
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    50/50 setup for a gal beginner..Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    In 2020 the boobed jongs go straight to the backcountry.
    ]
    +1
    Just make sure you’re comfortable with a jong skier making it through strainer trees and avy debris mank fast enough to dig your ass out.

    Maybe get her a plastic shovel while you’re buying stuff

    And in all seriousness, the M10 frame binding is more than enough for a “walk in the woods”. Shit, maybe concentrate on resort skills and get a set of Day Wreckers this season then reevaluate.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by brundo View Post
    Really appreciate everyone's help again.

    In summary, buy skis short to start with, maybe 160ish in length. Get an AT boot and Shifts or rent for AT.

    Moar questions:

    - Any suggestions for a soft women's AT boot with a 102mm last, ideally similar fit to the rossi all track 70? How much of a gamble is it to buy boots online knowing her foot's last? The boots I'm seeing that are softer AT boots are still 90-95 flex. I'm worried this is going to be too stiff for her. She's pretty light (probably closer to 115) and she wants to get stronger but currently is not very strong. Are these boots going to be too stiff for a light, beginner, who isn't that strong?

    - Something else just occurred to me, would she be a good fit for the lundahl Shift binding (or whatever people are calling it? Seems like it might be cheaper than shifts. For someone who doesn't need performance but wants to prioritize safety. Are tectons or vipecs or kingpins good alternatives to the shift?
    Man, she doesn't need a shift. Or a tecton or a vipec. They'd all work fine, but are WAY overkill. Just get her some regular alpine binders until she figures out if she even likes it. And if she likes it, she'll probably ski way more than 5 days a season. Rent a touring setup if she's super stoked on skiing and wants to tour. The only reason I mentioned tech compatible boots is looking forward -- feels dumb to drop coin on something that will become obsolete shortly after.

    Another option would be to find some old cheap boots and old cheap alpine gear to get her going until she skis well enough to warrant a better gear and/or a touring setup. If you can skin after hours at your local ski hill, I'd definitely start with that if possible before a real tour.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  23. #23
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    My wife skis most years. I got her a touring set up she uses some years to go ski some scenic, mostly flat terrain. She gives less than zero shits about ski about gear. I got her some old Scarpas (women's version of the Spirit 3), some beat old Dynafit Verticals and some skinny old K2 touring skis worth $0. It's perfect.

  24. #24
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    I'm in the same place as you, I think I'm taking her snowshoeing about a million times first. And some lessons at the resort.

  25. #25
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    Yeah, makes sense. I think I'm going to get her Pure 70 boot instead of the Alltrack boot. Looks like a similar boot. Same brand, same last, but no walk mode and half the price (on sale) and then get her a pair of snowshoes. If she loves skiing and loves snowshoeing then next year we can take a look at a good 50/50 boot like the MTN or Cochise.

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