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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Nelson, BC
    Posts
    33

    Winter camping tents??

    Hey I want to get into winter camping and multi-day ski tours and I'm looking for tent recommendations.
    I live in interior BC. I'm looking for a 2-3 person tent to use as a base camp. I've read pros/cons of single vs double wall construction but I was wondering if anybody had any personal feedback. Ease of setup is a priority.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Evergreen Co
    Posts
    437
    Iíve been really impressed with Hilleberg tents.

    Single wall tents are good for fast and light... but Iíve always been willing to bring an extra few pounds to make sure Iím comfortable and have some space for winter pursuits. There are a lot of dark cold tentbound hours in the winter. But Iím not trying to cover big stretches of ground in the winter.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Cackalacky
    Posts
    1,066
    I have an old sierra designs mountaineering tent. single wall, kinda heavy but absolutely bomber construction. it is at least 15 years old and has been completely recoated with PU once but is still going strong. i got it for like $50. it is very easy to set up. i'll see if i can find the model name.
    In the room the women come and go
    Talking of Michelangelo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Cackalacky
    Posts
    1,066
    Quote Originally Posted by Tailwind View Post
    Iíve been really impressed with Hilleberg tents.
    this is what you want, though. if you can afford to go this route, do so.
    In the room the women come and go
    Talking of Michelangelo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    3,135
    Look at tarptent.

    I have a double wall, 2.5 lbs, bomber.
    The inner and the fly set up at the same time, a few minutes. Just like hilleberg tents, but much lighter and cheaper.

    Sent from my Redmi Note 8 Pro using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    cordova,AK
    Posts
    2,905
    north face ve25. there is a reason they are still making this tent. heavy but if you have 2 or 3 people it is worth it. I would not bother with the footprint to save weight. Two doors, vestibule large enough to cook in and keep gear. another thing is compression sack for stuffing in winter.
    off your knees Louie

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Kootenays
    Posts
    1,382
    HIlleberg - cry once. I've spent many stormy nights as well as week long winter trips happy and cozy. Have to travel to the USA to get them though, or find a re-shipper? Not going to be easy to acquire one these days.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    13,818
    A bibler, a hilleberg, and/or a mid. I don't think MH makes the Kiva anymore, maybe. Those are your basecamp choices. I'm sure more modern manufacturers have come to their senses, but, those are what I've always used for when the shit really matters.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,557

    Winter camping tents??

    I have a double-wall Sierra Designs Tiros Convertible from 20 years ago that I still frequently use. It's the shit. It's also heavy. So if you value sleep and comfort over speed it's highly worth considering. Newer 2020 versions are going to be lighter. But... the lifetime of this tent is mind-blowing to me.

    That external vestibule for cooking and changing clothes out of the weather, and out of the tent, is a feature that should never be overlooked.

    With large vestibules you can build snow kitchens (meters) deep into the snowpack below your tent. It's like a whole other room with standing and sitting space.

    Heavy... but it's like a house. And if you're ever stuck in weather, you'll appreciate the living space.

    Most of my camping has been 2-3 nights in Montana & Wyoming ranges. I have never wished for a smaller/lighter set up. I have always valued a comfortable living quarters. YMMV.
    Last edited by gaijin; 11-19-2020 at 05:39 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    whistler
    Posts
    1,092
    Has anyone ever used a hot tent?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,967
    Many single wall tents are exceptional for winter but dismal in the rain. The advantage of a double wall is they can be used year round if wanted. Can't go wrong with Hilleberg. I would avoid all the old school designs if you are hauling it very far, but if weight isn't an issue definitely some good options there. Agree with the older Sierra Designs comments, I have a Nightwatch CD around 25 years old that has had numerous seasons of hard use, so well made., only had the zippers repaired once, no cost after owning it for years. Check ebay for lightly used North Face, Sierra Designs, Moss, etc. if you don't mind the weight. Expect to pay big bucks for a lightly used original design Moss though. I was going to recommend looking at Big Sky International tents, but probably on the smallish size for what you want. For a base camp in winter a large vestibule can be invaluable for bad weather cooking, etc.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Rossland BC
    Posts
    1,274
    How far are you going to be carrying it, if at all? For endless slogs Iíll make do with my Megamid, but Iíll use myHilleberg Nammatj 2 most of the time, and bring both for base camping(with the Mid for cooking and socializing). The Hilleberg is highly rated, and it works fine, but even with all its fancy design and ventilation features, I donít think it gets any less cold and wet as any other comparable (and less expensive) winter rated tents. Other than the long setup time(digging out a custom platform with benches), the Mid is actually the superior (no colder or wetter, more spacious, and you can cook and pee from your sleeping bag) winter camping experience. If I didnít have to carry it, I fantasize about one of those Alaskan Oven tents with a wood stove. Luxury.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by kootenayskier View Post
    I fantasize about one of those Alaskan Oven tents with a wood stove. Luxury.
    For sure!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Bay Area
    Posts
    156
    Quote Originally Posted by nickel View Post
    Has anyone ever used a hot tent?
    I think you can install a stove jack in a lot of tents DIY and then try to find a lightweight stove. TI goat used to make a little one but I think they are gone now. Pic of this sort of setup at end of this review: https://intocascadia.com/2015/11/30/...stratospire-2/

    Would probably work well with a mid.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using TGR Forums mobile app

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    6,319
    Not the setup for camping up on a ridge in a storm, but these intrigue me: https://seekoutside.com/6-person-tip...-liner-bundle/

    It's dark and cold for 16 hours a day mid-winter, and a space big enough to cook, hang out and be warm would be key for me staying more than a night or so. The tipi tent with stove gives you all of that for a reasonable weight.

    I bought one of these this fall on a closeout deal: https://slumberjack.com/outpost-4-tipi-tarp/
    I'm going to sew in a stove jack this winter: https://www.liteoutdoors.com/product/stove-jack/
    And I think I'll pick up one of these: https://www.liteoutdoors.com/product...itanium-stove/

    Gives me a heated shelter for 3 for around $400 and 6 pounds. I figure it's worth a try.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Fresh Lake City
    Posts
    3,632
    Quote Originally Posted by BFD View Post
    north face ve25. there is a reason they are still making this tent. heavy but if you have 2 or 3 people it is worth it. I would not bother with the footprint to save weight. Two doors, vestibule large enough to cook in and keep gear. another thing is compression sack for stuffing in winter.
    TNF Mountain 25 tent

    This is what I've used to winter camp and it's a solid choice. Not light, but managable especially if you pull a sled into camp. and half the cost of the hilleberg's.

    No matter what tent choice you go with I would highly recommend getting a "tent floor" from 40below.com. They're like $20-30 and is basically a piece of foam you can cut to fit the floor of your tent. Gives you insulation from the snow through your entire tent instead of just where your sleeping pad lies.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    1,042
    i took a sierra designs mountain guide tarp and put a stove jack in it. i carry a small 18x8" titanium cylinder stove and a foldable wood saw.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    the night this photo was taken the (measured) outside temp was -5 degrees, but we were inside, in our short sleeves, playing cards and getting drunk, warm as can be.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    the zipper on the side is where we pile up wood, making it easy to grab without needing a stack of sticks in your living room.

    the whole setup weighs like 7.5 lbs, which it totally packable. sleeps 3 super easily with the stove.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,967
    Marmot Thor 2P for a good price on ebay, used but new fly and looks in good shape (always ask about mildew if buying used)

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Marmot-Thor...Condition=3000

    Less than $100 more for a brand new Thor here: https://www.everestgear.com/math2pte...&kw=math2ptebl

    You might also PM thejongiest on the forums. I sold him a Walrus Rapeede XV (with a third support pole vs the original). It's a 2 person but on the smaller side but a bomber built tent and super cheap for the condition. It's probably long gone, but can't hurt to check. https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...-4-Season-Tent

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,057
    Quote Originally Posted by 3PinGrin View Post
    Marmot Thor 2P for a good price on ebay, used but new fly and looks in good shape (always ask about mildew if buying used)

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Marmot-Thor...Condition=3000

    Less than $100 more for a brand new Thor here: https://www.everestgear.com/math2pte...&kw=math2ptebl

    You might also PM thejongiest on the forums. I sold him a Walrus Rapeede XV (with a third support pole vs the original). It's a 2 person but on the smaller side but a bomber built tent and super cheap for the condition. It's probably long gone, but can't hurt to check. https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...-4-Season-Tent
    It's long gone...I sold it to someone else on here, though I can't remember who.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by thejongiest View Post
    It's long gone...I sold it to someone else on here, though I can't remember who.
    I figured, but wasn't sure. I hope they are getting good use out of it!

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Agrestic
    Posts
    5,303
    I've got a older version of the Mountain 25 (it's a 24) that I'd probable sell depending on the price.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    5,701
    Having been tent bound for 4+ days in a Sierra spring blizzards (above/at timberline and maritime), double walled, bigger than minimal size, able to withstand strong winds, and (possibly) freestanding.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    20sickness
    Posts
    500
    MSR makes a lightish 4 season tent that is designed for under tree line winter camping. Seems interesting and saves a bit of weight over a true mountaineering tent. I have the MH Trango 2, which is absolutely bomber in a breeze and heavy snow. It weighs quite a bit for two people, but you know once you get inside that you will be secure.

    Also second the megamid for longer trips and especially for spring trips under tree line. I took it in fall into the enchantments which worked great, though it's pretty loud in the wind so choose campsites accordingly.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,967
    Quote Originally Posted by brown9 View Post
    MSR makes a lightish 4 season tent that is designed for under tree line winter camping. Seems interesting and saves a bit of weight over a true mountaineering tent. I have the MH Trango 2, which is absolutely bomber in a breeze and heavy snow. It weighs quite a bit for two people, but you know once you get inside that you will be secure.

    Also second the megamid for longer trips and especially for spring trips under tree line. I took it in fall into the enchantments which worked great, though it's pretty loud in the wind so choose campsites accordingly.
    Yeah, location where you pitch definitely matters. If you can shelter in protective trees, avoid snow loading, etc. you can get away with a lighter build tent. It's sure nice to be in a very strong heavy tent when the shit hits the fan though! I have a Vango F10 Xenon UL 2 now, roomy and light but fragile materials so have to handle it with kid gloves a bit and not meant for a heavy snow load or relentless wind. I also had a MSR Hubba NX solo which I regret selling, that was a really cool little tent and so light. They make a more 4 season capable version now, and I think the MSR Access series is probably what you are referring to. Those MSR tents aren't cheap though. For a basecamp type situation I would err on the heavy / bomber side or going with a teepee style setup that has been mentioned to save weight. Or just built snow caves or a quinzee. Now that can be cozy and protective! Depending on how far you have to ski in you could ski in and build a cave/quinzee a week before your longer trip.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    1,042
    those msr access tents suck. bad durability and bad ventilation too.

    in general, double walled tents are much more livable for long term winter camping than single-walled shelters. here are my recommendations (assuming you are camping above treeline - below treeline you can get away with a ton of different tents, like others have said):

    for high winds and moderate snow loading >> tunnel tents (hillebergs - i have a nammatj3)
    for high winds and high snow loading >> mhw trango or similar, 3/4-pole designs (i use a hilleberg jannu for this slot)

    that said, for fast and light missions, a single walled tent works well (just as long as you aren't spending more than 2 or 3 nights in it). my pick is the crux assault, but i have used bd firstlights extensively. they're small as shit but strong and wind resistant and bomber.

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