Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 146

Thread: shroom picking

  1. #101
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,601
    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    This has been our approach. Shrooming isn't a huge hobby of ours but it is a great way of learning more about the natural world as we hike, backpack, etc. The edible species are just a nice bonus.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk
    Yeah, after about the 4th time I said to myself "woah, that's a cool one, I wonder what it is?" I figured I should do something about it.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    12,091
    I'm with you guys. They're just cool and it opened up a new appreciation for being in the woods. Although to be fair you never know when you're gonna find some oysters on the side of the road either.
    They got a name for the winners in the world

    http://procatinator.com/?cat=80

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    796
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mushcut.jpg 
Views:	47 
Size:	1.10 MB 
ID:	387094

    todays work... seperated by region
    buhh these are really hard to find atm

    but i have got my stash : D that should be enough for the next 12month

    i would call it a HAPPY HAUL
    LIVE IS NOT A CHAIRLIFT

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    511
    Similarly, my interest in mushrooms was piqued when I realized that deer hunting season in Western Washington often corresponds well with chantrelles. I haven't taken it farther than hunting chantrelles and cauliflower mushrooms because it's nearly impossible to screw those ones up.

    I can confirm that the book Mushrooming Without Fear mentioned above is a good low level introduction. I got it at the library, but should probably buy it to have on hand.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6,800
    My interest is generally mild and sporadic based on other obligations and life priorities. I had coworkers that were really into it, including one who now is a mycologists researcher. There’s a pretty strong/active community in my area who have an annual foray and a FB group that is very active. There’s a good ID/keying book for NorCal that we use at home. Many SME’s and the authors of that book participate regularly in the local FB group.

    Last winter, I found a mushroom on my property where one of the guidebook authors point out to the others trying to figure out what I found that it was a known spp, but poorly documented and not included in the book.

    My daughter and I have fun trying to key out samples that we find and checking with the FB group. We often can banter with the experts a bit to learn if we mis-keyed the specimens.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    N side, Terrace, BC
    Posts
    4,131
    This year has been insane for me. I've generally got a few mushrooms in the past. But this year between staying closer to home, retirement, and dog requiring daily 5km+ rides and hikes, I've been fucking slaying it. Also getting some great beta from long time shroomers on proper picking etiquette to ensure I'm harvesting sustainably.

    Part of the haul from 3 days ago (again just taking the dog for a bike ride). One dehydrator already almost full
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	lobster harvest 1.jpg 
Views:	55 
Size:	1.33 MB 
ID:	387404
    2 days ago:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	lobster harvest 2.jpg 
Views:	55 
Size:	1.21 MB 
ID:	387405
    Yesterday (pines and cauliflowers) and today (chantrelles, from my yard):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pine chantrelle.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	1.22 MB 
ID:	387409

    I feel insanely fortunate and blown away. I also don't think I'll have to buy store bought mushrooms all winter.

    edit, sorry about the fucking sideways photos.
    “I tell you, we are here on Earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you different.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country

    www.mymountaincoop.ca

    This is OUR mountain - come join us!

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    6,399
    wow Gary, nice haul
    life ain't guaranteed, love your people while you can

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    N side, Terrace, BC
    Posts
    4,131
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    wow Gary, nice haul
    Thanks buddy! I feel insanely lucky, it has to be luck since I have no real skills in this field haha. Miss ya, looking forward to another visit my friend (hopefully with family in tow).
    “I tell you, we are here on Earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you different.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country

    www.mymountaincoop.ca

    This is OUR mountain - come join us!

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Ellensburg
    Posts
    345
    Can I get some help identifying these? All growing in my lawn in Central WA, under birch, spruce, and hazelnut trees. In peak season, I've filled the wheel barrow to the brim... I guess I'm mainly concerned that some of them might be poisonous and that kids will eat them.

    #1




    #2




    #3



    #4



    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    899
    Nice bike ride here in WA

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9544.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	1.95 MB 
ID:	387842Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9540.jpg 
Views:	61 
Size:	1.25 MB 
ID:	387843

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    8,320
    Quote Originally Posted by sklar View Post
    Nice bike ride here in WA

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9544.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	1.95 MB 
ID:	387842Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9540.jpg 
Views:	61 
Size:	1.25 MB 
ID:	387843

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    6,448
    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    Does anyone know what these are? I've been seeing a ton around and am not a mushroom person.
    Around here we have lions mane that kinda looks like that. Quick google tells me this -

    The easiest way to tell a Lion's Mane from a coral fungi is the direction of the teeth. Lion's Mane mushroom and other hericiums have downward facing teeth while Coral fungi teeth point upwards.

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    The Garden State
    Posts
    3,740
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2673.jpg 
Views:	48 
Size:	1.89 MB 
ID:	387892

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Portland by way of Bozeman
    Posts
    3,785
    I'm not a picker, but I'll share a story from a motorcycle ride this weekend...

    I was out in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, riding some technical singletrack. For those outside the area, this expansive national forest covers a great deal of land between Mt. Adams and Mt. St. Helens in SW Washington. In particular, we were in the southern portion, near Dark Meadow and Dark Mountain when two riders emerge and ask us if we've seen a hiker recently.

    Apparently, they ran into a mushroom hunter in nothing but a hoodie and backpack who had been out in the Gifford (as we call it) for four days and nights. No camp gear, no provisions, and only subsisting on what he could forage and drinking from creeks. This was on Sunday, and it rained much of the week leading up to it. Four fucking nights with no gear with lows likely in the 30s or low 40s, at best. Fucking gnarly. The picker started out in Randle, which is well north of where he was contacted by the riders.

    The other riders were able to get a text out to a USFS Ranger stationed nearby and directed him to the nearest major road in hopes of extraction.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greater Drictor Wydaho
    Posts
    4,869
    Quote Originally Posted by jackstraw View Post
    Around here we have lions mane that kinda looks like that. Quick google tells me this -

    The easiest way to tell a Lion's Mane from a coral fungi is the direction of the teeth. Lion's Mane mushroom and other hericiums have downward facing teeth while Coral fungi teeth point upwards.
    No.

    The easiest way to distinguish between the two is that the hericium only grow on decaying wood and corals grow out of the soil.

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    6,448
    Quote Originally Posted by neckdeep View Post
    No.

    The easiest way to distinguish between the two is that the hericium only grow on decaying wood and corals grow out of the soil.
    NO!

    Whoa dude. Go easy there necky. If you were observant, you would have noticed it was a cut and paste in italics from googles. And we have decaying blowdowns, mostly buried, that have Lions Mane growing from what looks like soil.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greater Drictor Wydaho
    Posts
    4,869
    Quote Originally Posted by waveshello View Post
    Can I get some help identifying these? All growing in my lawn in Central WA, under birch, spruce, and hazelnut trees. In peak season, I've filled the wheel barrow to the brim... I guess I'm mainly concerned that some of them might be poisonous and that kids will eat them.

    #1




    #2




    #3



    #4



    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    The offcolor white with brown gills ones appear to be agaricus, the same genus that contains the common commercial mushroom agaricus bisporus. This is a complex genus to pick as it is large and has a lot of overlapping physical characteristics. It contains a mix of choice edible species, mediocre but edibles, bad tasting ones and some toxics. Agaricus toxins are not fatal, just gastroenteritis. But, the real danger lies in picking the young buttons. If you can't inspect the gills, you can't safely distinguish between the agaricus and amanitas, which can grow intermingled in lawn/meadow habitat. As a result, mistakes with agaricus species can be fatal and its probably the most common fatal mistake made by inexperienced pickers. Example: i cant tell what #3 is but stay away from white body/white gilled field mushrooms.
    Last edited by neckdeep; 10-06-2021 at 01:42 PM.

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    2,390
    Quote Originally Posted by neckdeep View Post
    The offcolor white with brown gills ones appear to be agarics, the same genus that contains the common commercial mushroom agaricus bisporus. This is a complex genus to pick as it is large and has a lot of overlapping physical characteristics. It contains a mix of choice edible species, mediocre but edibles, bad tasting ones and some toxics. Agaricus toxins are not fatal, just gastroenteritis. But, the real danger lies in picking the young buttons. If you can't inspect the gills, you can't safely distinguish between the agaricus and amanitas, which can grow intermingled in lawn/meadow habitat. As a result, mistakes with agaricus species can be fatal and its probably the most common fatal mistake made by inexperienced pickers. Example; i cant tell what #3 is but stay away from white body/white gilled field mushrooms.
    This is the right answer here. Another common mistake is puffballs vs amanitas - be careful when harvesting those. Amanitas has a number of clear distinguishing features when mature, the most notable of which being the cup or vulva that forms at the base of the mushroom.

    With Agaricus, the most common gastrointestinal irritating species (that I know of, anyway) is A. xanthodermus, which has a strong phenolic smell that only concentrates when boiled or cooked. If the mushroom smells sweet/almondy, you likely have A. arvensis or A. campestri, both choice edibles. A. xanthodermus smells disgusting when boiled


    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Ellensburg
    Posts
    345
    Quote Originally Posted by neckdeep View Post
    The offcolor white with brown gills ones appear to be agarics, the same genus that contains the common commercial mushroom agaricus bisporus. This is a complex genus to pick as it is large and has a lot of overlapping physical characteristics. It contains a mix of choice edible species, mediocre but edibles, bad tasting ones and some toxics. Agaricus toxins are not fatal, just gastroenteritis. But, the real danger lies in picking the young buttons. If you can't inspect the gills, you can't safely distinguish between the agaricus and amanitas, which can grow intermingled in lawn/meadow habitat. As a result, mistakes with agaricus species can be fatal and its probably the most common fatal mistake made by inexperienced pickers. Example; i cant tell what #3 is but stay away from white body/white gilled field mushrooms.
    Thank you. I did some of my own research between when I posted this and now, and indeed, 1-3 are very difficult to identify. I'll get some more pictures of #3 if I can--if I get some more coming up and can find a more mature sample.

    I'm thinking #4 maybe a false chanterelle?

    I'm not planning on eating any of these (I would if any were clearly edible), I mostly just wanted to know how careful I need to be about keeping these out of the yard for children's sake.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    2,390
    Also another common way of distinguishing between Amanitas and other choice edibles is that both puffballs and Agaricus will grow in clusters or clumps. Amanitas always grow as single mushrooms, though there could be multiple growing in close proximity.

    With puffballs, slice the mushie in half vertically to check and see if there is a proto-gill structure. If there is throw it out. If it looks uniform inside or with a slightly yellow paste, it's good.

    Not a foolproof method but one that has served me well. Amanitas absolutely exploded this year in Utah, I probably saw 50 Amanitas caps for every Agaricus or puffball.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk

  21. #121
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    5,633
    Anybody ever have a problem with their dog eating bad shrooms? We get some in the yard from time to time and I have no idea if they are safe or not..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  22. #122
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    2,390
    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    Anybody ever have a problem with their dog eating bad shrooms? We get some in the yard from time to time and I have no idea if they are safe or not..
    No but there are tons of species that are poisonous to dogs. The ones I would be worried about (in Utah anyway) are Amanitas and Coprinus/Coprinellus (ink caps). There are a few Facebook groups set up around emergency veterinarian plant/mushroom ID, I would bookmark those just in case.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using Tapatalk

  23. #123
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greater Drictor Wydaho
    Posts
    4,869
    Shroom toxins are scary but, for perspective, there are common wildflowers that are much, much worse. The worst shroom toxins take days to kill. There's a common flower around here thats so neurotoxic you probably wont make it to the hospital.

  24. #124
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Greater Drictor Wydaho
    Posts
    4,869
    Quote Originally Posted by waveshello View Post
    I'm thinking #4 maybe a false chanterelle?
    Looks like something in the paxillus genus. If it is a pax, its potentially toxic but fatal pax poisoning requires eating large amounts
    Last edited by neckdeep; 10-06-2021 at 01:57 PM.

  25. #125
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,601
    Quote Originally Posted by neckdeep View Post
    Shroom toxins are scary but, for perspective, there are common wildflowers that are much, much worse. The worst shroom toxins take days to kill. There's a common flower around here thats so neurotoxic you probably wont make it to the hospital.
    Wuzzat? Foxglove?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •